The work of Erin Shirreff takes time. To some that might seem anathema, immersed as we are in the all-consuming speed of the digital-media age. Yet given time, what the British Columbia–born, Brooklyn-based artist manages to do is vital. In her piece Ansel Adams, RCA Building, circa 1940 (2009), Shirreff re-photographs a reproduction of a black-and-white photo by Adams. The resulting stop-motion animation follows the course of natural daylight streaming through her studio window, at times amplified by alternating shutter speeds and exposure times. In the video, as Adams’s image gradually fades, then resolves, a kind of hypnotic rhythm takes hold. Yet hints of Shirreff’s material and conceptual layering remain in the fleeting impressions of light on an image locked in time. To find out more, check out the Spring 2014 issue of Canadian Art, which includes a feature article on Shirreff's art. Video provided courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

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