1. Analog Days: How Technology Changed Our Culture Alex Alben
    Hazel Miller Conversations in the Humanities
    Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014

    Join presenter and conversation host Alex Alben in exploring the impact of technological change on our culture and our lives. Humanity’s rapid adoption of computers, the Internet, and mobile devices has transformed the way people communicate. This technical revolution has effectively split society into “analog” and “digital” cultures – one rooted in books and built on face-to-face contact, the other riding the wings of a global computer network that provides news and entertainment at the click of a fingertip. Can old analog values survive in the new digital universe? Conversation, led by technology expert Alex Alben, explores how digital inventions are shaping communication, political discourse and today’s media landscape.

    For nearly two decades, Alex Alben has played a leadership role in companies that pioneered the field of digital media, including Starwave and Realnetworks. Alben’s career began as a researcher for Walter Cronkite at CBS Evening News in New York during the 1980 presidential election and later for Mike Wallace at CBS Reports. A graduate of Stanford University and Stanford Law School, his current work centers on applying intellectual property law for traditional media products – i.e., movies, music and books – to new products for digital distribution. He is the author of Our Man in Mongoa, a novel, and Analog Days – How Technology Rewrote Our Future. Alben currently lives in Seattle.

    # vimeo.com/88171073 Uploaded 27 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  2. "Slavery in the Northwest: The Charles Mitchell Story." Eva Abram
    This video is restricted for EdCC students viewing only please email: ksenia.koon@email.edcc.edu for password

    Jan. 14, 2014
    Storyteller Eva Abram will share the history of one of the few documented cases of slavery in our state’s history. Charles Mitchell, who was born a slave, was brought to Washington Territory in 1853. A tempest was building and citizens all over the state had opinions about a possible Civil War, influencing their opinions about Mitchell’s status as a slave. In this climate, Mitchell made a break for freedom – and his actions nearly started a war between the U.S. and Canada. Through this story, we will examine how ideologies move geographically. The migration to Washington attracted Americans with different socioeconomic experiences from both Northern and Southern states. Did moving to Washington affect peoples’ opinions on slavery?

    Eva Abram uses her talents as an actress and storyteller to share American history from an African-American perspective. Over the 12 years, she has been commissioned to write a story about Charles Lindbergh’s historic flight and has written and performed a piece for the Washington State History Museum’s Women’s Suffrage Jubilee. She has also presented workshops on storytelling for the Seattle Storytelling Guild and the Museum of Flight in Seattle, and, as an alumnus of Freehold Acting, has performed in several plays around the region. Abram earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington.

    # vimeo.com/85166477 Uploaded 20 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  3. Slavery in the Northwest: The Charles Mitchell Story
    Eva Abram
    Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, 7 p.m.
    Black Box Theatre
    Free and open to the public.
    425.640.1448
    Produced by
    Humanities Washington; Arts, Culture, and Civic Engagement at Edmonds CC; and Sno-Isle Libraries

    Storyteller Eva Abram will share the history of one of the few documented cases of slavery in our state’s history. Charles Mitchell, who was born a slave, was brought to Washington Territory in 1853. A tempest was building and citizens all over the state had opinions about a possible Civil War, influencing their opinions about Mitchell’s status as a slave. In this climate, Mitchell made a break for freedom – and his actions nearly started a war between the U.S. and Canada. Through this story, we will examine how ideologies move geographically. The migration to Washington attracted Americans with different socioeconomic experiences from both Northern and Southern states. Did moving to Washington affect peoples’ opinions on slavery?

    # vimeo.com/82562673 Uploaded 7 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  4. May 21, 2013
    Jennifer Stuller, "Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology"
    From Wonder Woman to Buffy Summers, Emma Peel to Sydney Bristow, Charlie’s Angels to the Powerpuff Girls, superwomen are more than just love interests or sidekicks who stand by their men. In this lively multimedia presentation, pop-culture historian Jennifer K. Stuller will help us explore how the female hero in modern mythology has broken through the boys’ club barrier of tradition. Using comics, television and film, we will discuss female action and super heroines from the 1930s to the present day. do social and political forces affect pop culture – and vice versa? This conversation will examine women’s representations in media and women’s roles as media makers, inspiring us to think deeper about popular culture, media, gender images and storytelling.

    # vimeo.com/67653363 Uploaded 22 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  5. Conversations in the Humanities: pop culture historian Jennifer K. Stuller
    Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 7 – 8 p.m.
    Black Box Theatre
    Free and open to the public.
    425.640.1448

    Humanities Washington; Arts, Culture, and Civic Engagement at Edmonds CC; and Sno-Isle Libraries
    Hazel Miller Conversations in the Humanities with pop culture historian Jennifer K. Stuller

    Jennifer Stuller, Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology
    From Wonder Woman to Buffy Summers, Emma Peel to Sydney Bristow, Charlie’s Angels to the
    Powerpuff Girls, superwomen are more than just love interests or sidekicks who stand by their men. In
    this lively multimedia presentation, pop-culture historian Jennifer K. Stuller will help us explore how the
    female hero in modern mythology has broken through the boys’ club barrier of tradition. Using comics,
    television and film, we will discuss female action and super heroines from the 1930s to the present
    day. do social and political forces affect pop culture – and vice versa? This conversation will examine
    women’s representations in media and women’s roles as media makers, inspiring us to think deeper
    about popular culture, media, gender images and storytelling.

    # vimeo.com/64152171 Uploaded 31 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

Follow

Conversations in the Humanities

Visual Media Services, EdCC Plus

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels. Channels