1. # vimeo.com/15579271 Uploaded 5 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. Film distributed in the United States by: ITN Distribution (non-exclusive)
    Film distributed internationally by: OTPL
    Film website: agentorangefilmjohntrinh.ash.com
    TRT: 56 min
    Contact: Jtrinh4@roadrunner.com

    This openhearted yet unflinching film collects the unvarnished, unembellished testimonies of Vietnamese who've suffered great physical and psychological pain in the decades since their—or their spouses'—exposure to the herbicide. Avoiding sensationalism and cheap theatrics, the filmmaker asks us to see and accept the realities of chemical warfare.

    In this clip, a former South Vietnamese soldier—a U.S. ally—describes the maladies that afflicted him in the years after his exposure to the herbicide and expresses his abhorrence for chemical weapons.

    "This guy says that he would rather fight conventionally with guns, with knives," Trinh says. "He felt it was so atrocious to use chemical weapons. He was hurt by his allies, right? 'You fight your enemy, right? So why am I hurt?' It makes no sense to him. 'Now the war is over, I still don't have my life. I'm sick. I'm worried about my kids, and even my grandkids. Are they going to be sick as well?'"

    WARNING: The unauthorized reproduction, distribution, copy, display and any other use of this copyrighted clip(s) is illegal. Criminal copyright infringement without monetary gain is investigated by the FBI and punishable by up to 5 years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000.

    # vimeo.com/15576384 Uploaded 96 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  3. Film distributed in the United States by: ITN Distribution (non-exclusive)
    Film distributed internationally by: OTPL
    Film website: agentorangefilmjohntrinh.ash.com
    TRT: 56 min
    Contact: Jtrinh4@roadrunner.com

    This openhearted yet unflinching film collects the unvarnished, unembellished testimonies of Vietnamese who've suffered great physical and psychological pain in the decades since their—or their spouses'—exposure to the herbicide. Avoiding sensationalism and cheap theatrics, the filmmaker asks us to see and accept the realities of chemical warfare.

    In this clip, a women who endured three abortions, addressing us bravely and candidly, describes how her husband's exposure to Agent Orange made her unable to conceive a child without severe defects.

    Trinh shoots her in close-up, the tight framing intended not to shock or shame us into listening to her testimony but to give the visceral experience that she is addressing us directly.

    "She told me her life story," Trinh recalls, "and I wanted people to see the suffering, the pain, the sorrow that shows through the eyes. She holds back her tears, she doesn't cry. I could tell she was crying inside; I could hear it in her voice. The only thing I could do was pull in on the eyes."

    WARNING: The unauthorized reproduction, distribution, copy, display and any other use of this copyrighted clip(s) is illegal. Criminal copyright infringement without monetary gain is investigated by the FBI and punishable by up to 5 years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000.

    # vimeo.com/15342959 Uploaded 68 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  4. Distributed by: Black Bags Productions
    Film website: throughtheireyesdoc.com
    TRT: 74 min
    Contact: jackeechang@gmail.com

    This inviting travelogue encourages us to see what life is like for Vietnamese families dealing with the ongoing legacy of dioxin poisoning. The filmmaker's cheerful interactions with her subjects—visible in nearly every scene and embodied in the snatches of up-close, black-and-white handheld footage she shot herself, goes a long way toward dispelling the viewer's discomfort at looking at people with deformities and disabilities.

    In this clip, the disabled workers employed in a clothing factory convey a palpable sense of camaraderie, productivity and worth.

    The filmmaker discovered a rejuvenating workplace that's anything but a sweatshop. "In a village, [if you're disabled] you're usually isolated in your situation and your condition," Chang explains. "Here they're part of a community. Especially for a Western audience, [it] would come to mind that younger girls would be exploited. But they won me over; it's not like that at all."

    The all-female team had no problem getting access to the factory. "We had a permit but we didn't get it 'til after we shot everything," Chang recalls. "If we were caught we would have been in trouble. The saving grace in [Vietnam] is they think girls aren't capable of doing very much. In the government's eyes, we weren't capable of causing trouble."

    # vimeo.com/15579569 Uploaded 104 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  5. Film distributed by: Black Bags Productions
    Film website: throughtheireyesdoc.com
    TRT: 74 min
    Contact: jackeechang@gmail.com

    This inviting travelogue encourages us to see what life is like for Vietnamese families dealing with the ongoing legacy of dioxin poisoning. The filmmaker's cheerful interactions with her subjects—visible in nearly every scene and embodied in the snatches of up-close, black-and-white hand held footage she shot herself, goes a long way toward dispelling the viewer's discomfort at looking at people with deformities and disabilities.

    In this clip, a father of three disabled children explains his philosophy of acceptance, and persistence. "Buddha said, 'Exhaust all means, then fate will be revealed.' We must try everything possible, then help will arrive."

    "The last person I met is the last person in the film," Chang notes. "I'd been in Vietnam for three months, and I was exhausted by the time I got to the Mekong Delta. He brought a lot of positive energy, and after I left him I knew he would be the person who would be at the end of the film. It just makes sense that it ends positively. He explains why people accept their fate. It's very Asian, it's very Vietnamese, it's very Buddhist."

    # vimeo.com/15636417 Uploaded 50 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

Make Agent Orange History

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America is at its best when it responds to humanitarian concerns and works to promote hope and dignity among people in need. We all have an opportunity to do this in Vietnam today and close wounds from the past.

Thirty-five years after the end of the


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America is at its best when it responds to humanitarian concerns and works to promote hope and dignity among people in need. We all have an opportunity to do this in Vietnam today and close wounds from the past.

Thirty-five years after the end of the Vietnam War, harmful effects of Agent Orange/dioxin contamination are still being felt by millions in Vietnam. According to the Red Cross, three million Vietnamese have been affected by Agent Orange, including 150,000 of today's children who were born with serious birth defects. Beyond this generational impact, the number of affected people continues to grow due to the persistence of several toxic and hazardous "hot spots" where the herbicides were stored, leaked or spilled during the war.

But there's hope. Groups in the U.S. and Vietnam are working together to break this devastating cycle and bring hope and dignity to families in Vietnam. This website will showcase that work, provide easy ways for others to get involved and create a community of people working side-by-side to make Agent Orange history.

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