1. (Marquette, MI) - EarthKeepers II, an Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula, will create 30 native plant gardens and conduct free energy audits at 40 houses of worship plus give grants make repairs to reduce airborne mercury from entering the Great Lakes and made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    A press conference (1-18-13) announcing the plans in Marquette, MI was hosted by the Northern Michigan University EarthKeepers II Student Team: Katelin Bingner, Tom Merkel and Adam Magnuson.

    The NMU students are planning to write and record public service messages with energy conservation tips, information on protecting the Great Lakes and about the importance of native plants restoration – with assistance from U.P. radio stations, newspapers and television stations.

    The EarthKeepers II Initiative is sponsored by the churches/temples of 10 faith traditions that were involved in the original Earth Keeper Initiative (2004-2009): Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Bahá'í, Unitarian Universalist, Zen Buddhist.

    Speakers were Bishops and other denominational leaders from 10 faith communities plus U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Regional Botanist Jan Schultz, Delta Green Ex. Dir. Doug Russell and Cedar Tree Institute Ex. Dir. Rev. Jon Magnuson.

    The EarthKeepers II projects include energy conservation audits at 40 U.P. churches/temples plus grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for each site to assist in changes/repairs.

    The faith communities are demonstrating the importance of energy conservation to lower utility bills and reduce and prevent toxins/pollution including airborne mercury from entering Lake Superior as part of the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    Congregations will be given info on energy conservation kits and utility company rebates to lower household bills.

    The energy conservation audits include insulation (walls/roof), lighting fixtures, ventilation, and heating systems like boilers/furnaces that may be updated with new controls, repaired or replaced.

    The project : 30 community gardens (2 per county/more possible). These gardens will grow native (indigenous) plants and vegetables for community distribution and food pantries.

    The nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette has been involved in U.P. native plant restoration to fight invasive species that are vital to the health of all wildlife. For example, the U.P. is on a flight path for migrating Monarch butterflies who depend on milkweed for food and reproduction.

    Project participants: Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, EPA, USFS Eastern Region 9 technical assistance, nonprofit Delta Green, U.P. Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) communities and Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI

    Religious community leaders signed the northern Michigan Earth Keeper Covenant in 2004 pledging to actively participate in environment projects, build bridges with other faiths and reach out to Native American communities.

    EarthKeepers II is the next phase of the Earth Keeper Initiative that held three Earth Day Clean Sweeps involving 150 churches/temples plus planted 12,000 trees during a summer with severe U.P. forest fires.

    U.P. Earth Keepers Clean Sweeps (2005-2007) had free Earth Day collection sites across a 400-mile area of northern Michigan.

    Over 15,000 residents turned in 320 tons of e-waste (old computers/cell phones), 45 tons of Household Hazardous Waste including car batteries, oil-based paint, pesticides, liquid mercury, and other common poisons; and over a ton of pharmaceuticals including $500,000 in narcotics.

    The hazardous waste was either recycled or properly disposed.

    EarthKeepers II website
    EarthKeepersUP.org
    Social sites:
    EarthKeepersII.blogspot.com
    facebook.com/EarthKeepersII
    vimeo.com/EarthKeepersII
    twitter.com/EarthKeeperTeam
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/EarthKeepers-II-and-the-EPA-Great-Lakes-Restoratio/

    Rev. Jon Magnuson
    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute
    403 E. Michigan St.
    Marquette, MI

    906-228-5494
    906-360-5072
    magnusonx2@charter.net

    CedarTreeInstitute.org
    wingsandseeds.org

    Kyra Fillmore Ziomkowski
    Project Coordinator
    906-250-7643
    kyra.fillmore@gmail.com

    Greg Peterson
    Volunteer media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
    greatlakesrestoration.us
    epa.gov

    Jan Schultz,
    USFS Eastern Region Botanist
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    fs.fed.us/wildflowers
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ethnobotany

    Doug Russell
    Delta Green Ex. Dir.
    drussell@deltagreenusa.org

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
    kbic-nsn.gov/content/natural-resources
    ojibwacampground.com

    Charlotte Loonsfoot
    KBIC Natural Resources Committee chair

    Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRC
    eravindran@kbic-nsn.gov
    906-524-5757

    # vimeo.com/59372146 Uploaded 20 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. (Marquette, MI) - EarthKeepers II, an Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula, will create 30 native plant gardens and conduct free energy audits at 40 houses of worship plus give grants make repairs to reduce airborne mercury from entering the Great Lakes and made possible by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    A press conference (1-18-13) announcing the plans in Marquette, MI was hosted by the Northern Michigan University EarthKeepers II Student Team: Katelin Bingner, Tom Merkel and Adam Magnuson.

    The NMU students are planning to write and record public service messages with energy conservation tips, information on protecting the Great Lakes and about the importance of native plants restoration – with assistance from U.P. radio stations, newspapers and television stations.

    The EarthKeepers II Initiative is sponsored by the churches/temples of 10 faith traditions that were involved in the original Earth Keeper Initiative (2004-2009): Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Presbyterian, United Methodist, Bahá'í, Unitarian Universalist, Zen Buddhist.

    Speakers were Bishops and other denominational leaders from 10 faith communities plus U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Regional Botanist Jan Schultz, Delta Green Ex. Dir. Doug Russell and Cedar Tree Institute Ex. Dir. Rev. Jon Magnuson.

    The EarthKeepers II projects include energy conservation audits at 40 U.P. churches/temples plus grants ranging from $500 to $1,000 for each site to assist in changes/repairs.

    The faith communities are demonstrating the importance of energy conservation to lower utility bills and reduce and prevent toxins/pollution including airborne mercury from entering Lake Superior as part of the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    Congregations will be given info on energy conservation kits and utility company rebates to lower household bills.

    The energy conservation audits include insulation (walls/roof), lighting fixtures, ventilation, and heating systems like boilers/furnaces that may be updated with new controls, repaired or replaced.

    The project : 30 community gardens (2 per county/more possible). These gardens will grow native (indigenous) plants and vegetables for community distribution and food pantries.

    The nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette has been involved in U.P. native plant restoration to fight invasive species that are vital to the health of all wildlife. For example, the U.P. is on a flight path for migrating Monarch butterflies who depend on milkweed for food and reproduction.

    Project participants: Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, EPA, USFS Eastern Region 9 technical assistance, nonprofit Delta Green, U.P. Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) communities and Borealis Seed Company in Big Bay, MI

    Religious community leaders signed the northern Michigan Earth Keeper Covenant in 2004 pledging to actively participate in environment projects, build bridges with other faiths and reach out to Native American communities.

    EarthKeepers II is the next phase of the Earth Keeper Initiative that held three Earth Day Clean Sweeps involving 150 churches/temples plus planted 12,000 trees during a summer with severe U.P. forest fires.

    U.P. Earth Keepers Clean Sweeps (2005-2007) had free Earth Day collection sites across a 400-mile area of northern Michigan.

    Over 15,000 residents turned in 320 tons of e-waste (old computers/cell phones), 45 tons of Household Hazardous Waste including car batteries, oil-based paint, pesticides, liquid mercury, and other common poisons; and over a ton of pharmaceuticals including $500,000 in narcotics.

    The hazardous waste was either recycled or properly disposed.

    EarthKeepers II website
    EarthKeepersUP.org
    Social sites:
    EarthKeepersII.blogspot.com
    facebook.com/EarthKeepersII
    vimeo.com/EarthKeepersII
    twitter.com/EarthKeeperTeam
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/
    pinterest.com/EarthKeepersII/EarthKeepers-II-and-the-EPA-Great-Lakes-Restoratio/

    Rev. Jon Magnuson
    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute
    403 E. Michigan St.
    Marquette, MI

    906-228-5494
    906-360-5072
    magnusonx2@charter.net

    CedarTreeInstitute.org
    wingsandseeds.org

    Kyra Fillmore Ziomkowski
    Project Coordinator
    906-250-7643
    kyra.fillmore@gmail.com

    Greg Peterson
    Volunteer media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
    greatlakesrestoration.us
    epa.gov

    Jan Schultz,
    USFS Eastern Region Botanist
    414-297-1189
    jschultz@fs.fed.us

    fs.fed.us/wildflowers
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/invasives
    fs.fed.us/wildflowers/ethnobotany

    Doug Russell
    Delta Green Ex. Dir.
    drussell@deltagreenusa.org

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
    kbic-nsn.gov/content/natural-resources
    ojibwacampground.com

    Charlotte Loonsfoot
    KBIC Natural Resources Committee chair

    Evelyn Ravindran, KBIC NRC
    eravindran@kbic-nsn.gov
    906-524-5757

    # vimeo.com/59372940 Uploaded 25 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
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  4. Northern Michigan University students crossed campus in wind-driven heavy snow showers on Feb. 27, 2013 to sign the petition to save Michigan gray wolves from being hunted.

    Event sponsors:
    NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team
    Native American Students Association (NASA)

    Keep Michigan Wolves Protected have until March 27 to get 161,305 signatures to allow voters to decide the fate wolves.

    An all-day petition drive with numerous NMU student organizations is planned for March 20, 2013.
    Organizers hope to have Michigan Secretary of State representatives on hand to register people to vote.

    Only registered Michigan voters can sign the petitions provided by Keep Michigan Wolves Protected that seek a Nov. 2014 referendum.

    "This is (about) hatred" of wolves, said Adam Robarge, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected Upper Peninsula coord.

    "I see zero reasons" for a wolf hunt, Robarge said. Wolves and deer have evolved "with each other for thousands of years."

    Wolves "just got off the endangered species list so to hunt them seems premature," said NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team member Adam Magnuson, 21, of Marquette. "It is interesting that people want to hunt an animal that they rarely see."

    Many "people seem to think that the wolf is some big bad animal but there has never been a recorded attack on a human in Michigan history," said Magnuson, an NMU environmental studies and sustainability major. Research shows "wolves aren't so scary."

    "We need to be careful to consider the ecological and biological" impacts of a wolf hunt, said NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team member Katelin Bingner, 20.

    U.P. wolves are "just getting re-established firmly now," said Bingner, NMU sophomore biology major from Spring Arbor, MI. The public should "vote on such an important issue."

    "There is still a lot broken in the world in our understanding on how things connect" but "people's eyes are opening to the reality of the connectedness of humans to the wider world," Bingner said.

    The interfaith NMU EarthKeepers II "need to defend what Native Americans believe," Magnuson said.

    Catholic "St. Francis of Assisi befriended a wolf and is often depicted in images with a wolf," said Tom Merkel, NMU Catholic Campus Ministry peer minister at St. Michael Parish.

    Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI is "the green pope" and "is very pro-environment saying the church has to ... protect God's Creation," Merkel said. "He has made the Vatican very green which is pretty cool."

    "The wolf is one of their (Anishinaabe) religious symbols and we have to protect that," Merkel said.

    Hannah Vallier and Amanda Weinert are NASA co-presidents and citizens of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians.

    "I am wolf clan (ma'iingan-doodem) -- we believe that we're related (to wolves)," Vallier said. Killing a wolf is "almost like me killing my own brother."

    Wolves "are important to tribal people" and Anishinaabe heritage/culture, said Weinert, 21.

    Weinert explained a traditional story from elders that "the first Anishinaabe man was lonely and asked for a companion."

    "Gitchi Manitou (the Great Spirit) gave him a wolf or ma'iingan," Weinert said. "They went on a journey to name all the plants and animals."

    After the journey "they were told they could no longer be companions" but will stay connected and live parallel lives, said Weinert of Garden, MI.

    Weinert said today Native Americans and wolves continue to "live parallel lives."

    "The connections between native people and wolves" include "we've both been relocated" slaughtered and misunderstood, said Weinert, an NMU senior.

    Weinert said the thought of a Mich. wolf hunt makes her "sad and is very distressing."

    Republican Governor Rick Snyder signed a law making the wolf a game animal.

    A Feb. 2013 lawsuit was filed against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Kenneth Salazar by the Humane Society of the United States, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of Animals and Their Environment, Help Our Wolves Live, and Born Free USA.

    Before delisting, MN had about 3,000 wolves, while MI and WI had 687 and 782, respectively.

    EarthKeepers II
    EarthKeepersUP.org

    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute
    Marquette, MI
    CedarTreeInstitute.org

    NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team:

    Adam Magnuson
    admagnus@nmu.edu

    Katelin Bingner
    kbingner@gmail.com

    Tom Merkel
    tmerkel@nmu.edu

    NMU Native American Students Association (NASA)
    nmu.edu/nativeamericanstudies/node/106
    nasa@nmu.edu

    NASA Co-Presidents
    Amanda Weinert
    aweinert@nmu.edu

    Hannah Vallier
    hvallier@nmu.edu

    NASA Supervisors:

    Tina Moses
    cmoses@nmu.edu

    Grace Chaillier
    grachail@nmu.edu
    ---
    Adam Robarge, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected U.P. Coord.
    atrobarge@gmail.com
    info@keepwolvesprotected.com
    keepwolvesprotected.com
    ---
    Greg Peterson
    EarthKeepers II
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/61120391 Uploaded 304 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  5. NMU Native American Students Association, NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team Work to Protect Wolves

    (Marquette, Michigan) - Leading 2013 campus petition signing events to save Michigan gray wolves from being hunted is the Northern Michigan University Native American Students Association.

    Event sponsors:
    NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team
    Native American Students Association (NASA)

    Keep Michigan Wolves Protected must get 161,305 signatures from registered voters by March 27 for a Nov. 2014 referendum.

    An all-day petition drive with numerous NMU student organizations is planned for March 20, 2013.
    Organizers hope to have Michigan Secretary of State reps on hand to register people to vote.

    "This is (about) hatred" of wolves, said Adam Robarge, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected Upper Peninsula coord.

    "I see zero reasons" for a wolf hunt, Robarge said. Wolves and deer have evolved "with each other for thousands of years."

    Wolves "just got off the endangered species list so to hunt them seems premature," said NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team member Adam Magnuson, 21, of Marquette. "It is interesting that people want to hunt an animal that they rarely see."

    The interfaith NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team is "standing by the Native American tribes because it is so important to them,” said Magnuson. "We need to defend what they (Native Americans) believe in.”

    Catholic St. Francis of Assisi "befriended a wolf" and is "often depicted in images with a wolf,” said Tom Merkel, NMU Catholic Campus Ministry peer minister at St. Michael Parish.

    NMU EarthKeepers II team is "standing with the native tribes up here," Merkel said. "The wolf is one of their religious symbols and we have to protect that.”

    Bingner said the wolf “isn't our enemy" and is "closer to being something like our brother."

    Hannah Vallier and Amanda Weinert are NASA co-presidents and citizens of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians.

    "I am ma'iingan-doodem so I am wolf clan – and we believe that we are related to wolves and we are kin,” said Vallier. "If I killed a wolf it would be almost like me killing my own brother."

    Wolves and humans have similarities including "we are both family-orientated," Vallier said. “Our mothers as humans are just as protective of our children as the wolves are to their pups.”

    Wolves "are important to tribal people" and are significant in Anishinaabe heritage and culture, said Amanda Weinert, 21.

    Weinert explained a traditional story from elders that "the first Anishinaabe man was lonely and asked for a companion."

    "Gitchi Manitou, the Great Spirit, gave him a wolf or ma'iingan," Weinert said. "They went on a journey to name all the plants and animals."

    After the journey, "they were told they could no longer be companions" but would stay connected and live parallel lives, said Weinert, a Garden, Michigan native.

    Weinert said today Native Americans and wolves continue to "live parallel lives."

    "The connections between native people and wolves" includes both were relocated, slaughtered and misunderstood, said Weinert, an NMU senior with a major in metalsmithing/jewelry with minors in science and Native American studies.

    Weinert said the thought of a wolf hunt in Michigan makes her "sad and is very distressing" as she feels if the hunt starts people will "go overboard and shoot them whenever."

    “Wolves deserve to be saved for their own existence,” Robarge said.

    NMU senior Max Wojciechowski said wolves must be a "protected species because traditionally it's a very sacred animal and its not supposed to be hunted."

    “It coincides with my traditional values to try and protect the wolves,” said Wojciechowski, a NASA member and a native of McHenry, Ill. in the Chicago suburbs.

    Republican Governor Rick Snyder signed a law making the wolf a game animal.

    A Feb. 2013 lawsuit was filed against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Kenneth Salazar by the Humane Society of the United States, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of Animals and Their Environment, Help Our Wolves Live, and Born Free USA.

    Michigan has 687 wolves.

    EarthKeepers II
    EarthKeepersUP.org

    Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute
    Marquette, MI
    CedarTreeInstitute.org

    NMU EarthKeepers II Student Team:

    Adam Magnuson
    admagnus@nmu.edu

    Katelin Bingner
    kbingner@gmail.com

    Tom Merkel
    tmerkel@nmu.edu

    NMU Native American Students Association (NASA)
    nmu.edu/nativeamericanstudies/node/106
    nasa@nmu.edu

    NASA Co-Presidents
    Amanda Weinert
    aweinert@nmu.edu

    Hannah Vallier
    hvallier@nmu.edu

    NASA Supervisors:

    Tina Moses
    cmoses@nmu.edu

    Grace Chaillier
    grachail@nmu.edu
    ---
    Adam Robarge, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected U.P. Coord.
    atrobarge@gmail.com
    info@keepwolvesprotected.com
    keepwolvesprotected.com
    ---
    Greg Peterson
    EarthKeepers II/Cedar Tree Institute media advisor
    906-401-0109
    EarthKeepersII@gmail.com

    # vimeo.com/61237525 Uploaded 169 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

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