1. The human brain is a remarkably efficient engine of visual processing. Even short 1-second shots can reveal an incredible amount of information, and recall one of the most extraordinary voyages of exploration in human history. Presented here is the first manned mission to the Moon, July 1969, in 100 one-second increments. Take a minute and a half and enjoy the voyage once again. From spacecraftfilms.com, the definitive collections of US space history on DVD.

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  3. This clip is raw from Camera E-8 on the launch umbilical tower/mobile launch program of Apollo 11, July 16, 1969. If you like out videos, an amount in the tip jar helps us make more.

    This is an HD transfer from the 16mm original. Even more excellent footage is available on our DVDs at our website at spacecraftfilms.com

    The camera is running at 500 fps, making the total clip of over 8 minutes represent just 30 seconds of actual time. Narration is provided by Mark Gray (me), Executive Producer for Spacecraft Films.

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  4. MIT Laboratory for Automation, Robotics, and Society
    Directed by David Mindell

    Visualization Design: Yanni Loukissas
    Research Assistant: Francisco Alonso

    The Apollo 11 visualization draws together social and technical data from the 1969 moon landing in a dynamic 2D graphic. The horizontal axis is an interactive timeline. The vertical axis is divided into several sections, each corresponding to a data source. At the top, commentators are present in narratives from Digital Apollo and NASA technical debriefings. Just below are the members of ground control. The middle section is a log-scale graph stretching from Earth (~10E9 ft. away) to the Moon. Utterances from the landing CAPCOM, Duke, the command module pilot, Collins, the mission commander, Armstrong, and the lunar module pilot, Aldrin, are plotted on this graph. The graph is partially overlaid on a composite image of the lunar surface. Data from the Apollo computer systems, the DSKY (display/keyboard interface to the Apollo computer) and the AGC (Abort Guidance Computer) occupies the bottom of the visualization. Each circle on the graph represents an utterance by one member of the team or ground control, with the size of the circle proportional to the length of the utterance. Lines connecting subsequent utterances represent inquiries and responses between team members. Specific events are labeled, such as computer program changes and program alarms. During a real-time playback, the white line moves across the horizontal axis as audio plays, and the crew’s specific utterances are spelled out to the right. In sync with the human dialog, the AGC and DSKY display values and modes. In these dynamics, one can trace the trading of workload and authority during the critical final phases of landing, and how that workload was offloaded from the lunar module to Houston in response to the program alarms.

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  5. From the free documentary "Moonscape", which covers the Apollo 11 Moon landing with restored and resynced original footage, audio and photographs. The full documentary can be viewed in English and Italian at moonscape.info, where you can also make a donation or provide technical help to support this ongoing project.

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