1. In late 2012 I joined forces with Cantina Creative to help deliver over 100 shots for IRON MAN 3.

    Marvel tasked us with designing all the elaborate 3D head-up displays (HUDs) – a virtual graphical interface that Iron Man sees from within the helmet environment of his armored suits that communicate essential data and statistics ranging from his physical condition to weapon and navigational diagnostics – While putting strong emphasis on the new ultra-high-tech Mark 42 suit, we also delivered upgraded HUDs to match the new suits seen in the film. It was great fun.

    All of the 3D elements, including a miniature version of the suit and the holographic helmet, were generated and rendered from CINEMA 4D. These graphics had true 3D depth, which heightened the stereo viewing experience as well as the interactive light qualities that are both photo-real and immersive.

    This is a process montage that was created to give some insight into the development and design thinking stages of the work I was specifically involved with on the film.

    Credits:
    Cantina Creative
    VFX Supervisor: Venti Hristova
    VFX Producer: Sean Cushing
    Digital Producer: Lily Shapiro
    VFX Artists: Aaron Eaton, Matt Eaton, Jonathan Ficcadenti, Jayse Hansen, Stephen Lawes, John Likens, Leon Nowlin Jr., Alan Torres, Lukas Weyandt

    For more extensive breakdowns see these articles:
    fxguide.com/featured/iron-man-3-more-suits-to-play-with/
    maxon.net/en/news/singleview-default/article/cantina-creative-gives-iron-man-3-a-heads-up-with-maxon-cinema-4d.html
    johnlikens.com/ironman3.html

    © 2013 Marvel Studios, Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, Paramount Pictures.

    Music by Gesaffelstein.

    # vimeo.com/66944464 Uploaded 207K Plays / / 60 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. I found out about Ankles' (ohankles.com) work through the editor of Collect Magazine (collectmag.com.au), Josh Fanning. Collect has championed the resurgence of independent businesses selling goods handcrafted by artisans. What has always struck me about the people they profile is that they're not just adding 'handcrafted' to their mass-produced wares to give them a PR edge. Nor are they weekend hobbyists who sell arts and crafts every other weekend at the corner market. They are serious businesses that have found an emotional attachment to the artisan pursuit, and they love the products that result. Most importantly, the pursuit of handcrafted is not necessarily spearheaded by the pursuit of archaic technologies; those in the field that I most admire use modern technology to augment these traditional approaches. It's where you'll see the iMac next to the manual printing press.

    It's hard in film to approach things in a similar fashion, especially as a commercial filmmaker. We possess no interest in shooting on 16mm and Nagras. Nor do we want to throw Instagram filters onto everything we shoot. But the arrival of 35mm DSLR cameras shooting moving pictures, that can also fit in your backpack, have allowed us as a company to resurrect some of the visual tone and imagery of more traditional cinema, especially European cinema of the 1960s. Modern movements like Dogme 95 were a stop-gap solution to handle the arrival of digital; now we can finally combine modern technology with traditional looks in any way we see fit. We shoot digital, but we can now also feast on the visual library that the great masters provided us.

    What I'm saying, I guess, is that we feel like we're somehow allowed to cast ourselves (if only just) as members of this handcrafted revolution. Which is what we wanted reflected in our logo.

    We'd been planning a new, simpler look for a while, and Ankles agreed to come on board. The term 'Urtext' itself comes from classical music, referring to a score that has endeavoured to return to the original intent of the composer, free of editorial intervention. It's a concept we hold dear, and wanted reflected in our logo. Ankles, a typography obsessive, looked at traditional music scores and their intricate style for inspiration. We wanted a logo that would work across many spaces. It had to work coming up from black in a dark cinema. It also had to work as a facebook profile picture.

    The logo Ankles arrived at is actually quite simple. Graphic design, like many art forms in the 'commercial services', strives to attain simplicity, often through complicated paths. And that's what we think makes it so effective. And looking at it, there's something in it that displays the artisan process. Not just because it refers to a more classical style, but because somewhere in there is the hand of the artist.

    I've been working in the advertising game for a few years now, fearing what, and who, I'd find as I turn each corner. What I've found again and again are artists who strive to not be noticed, like the signwriters of the old world. I'm hoping this short film will be the first of many to peer into the process of such artists. To reveal the hands behind such simple things. Since working with Ankles I've found that I see the art behind typography wherever I look. Slowly I feel I'm becoming as obsessed as him.

    I think that's a good thing.

    Matthew Salleh
    Director @ Urtext Films

    # vimeo.com/51114027 Uploaded 102K Plays / / 19 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  3. About Blair Enns

    Blair Enns is the founder of the Win Without Pitching movement and a business development adviser to marketing communication agencies. Through his global consulting practice Enns works with principals and personnel of independently-owned design firms, ad agencies and public relations practices.

    Enns lectures widely, addressing advertising, design and public relations audiences throughout the English-speaking world. He operates from a remote mountain location near the tiny Victorian village of Kaslo, British Columbia, Canada.

    You can read more about his company and its ideology here: winwithoutpitching.com/founder

    Video Production & Editing: Dave Priban (shakypencil.com)
    Motion Design: Ivan Cruz (ivancruz.mx)
    Equipment provided by: Giant Ant Media (giantantmedia.com)

    # vimeo.com/9408659 Uploaded 1,610 Plays / / 1 Comment Watch in Couch Mode
  4. Our speaker at the March 2011 San Francisco, CreativeMornings (creativemornings.com) was Mike Monteiro, Design Director, and co-founder of Mule Design Studio (muledesign.com). This event took place on March 25, 2011 and was sponsored by Happy Cog and Typekit (who also hosted the event at their office in the Mission).

    Mike's book "Design is a Job" is available from A Book Apart (abookapart.com/products/design-is-a-job)

    A big giant thank you to Chris Whitmore (whitmoreprod.com) for offering to shoot and edit the video. Photos were graciously provided by Rawle Anders (twitter.com/rawle42).

    The San Francisco chapter of Creative Mornings is run by Greg Storey (twitter.com/brilliantcrank).

    Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/SanFrancisco_CM

    # vimeo.com/22053820 Uploaded 726K Plays / / 113 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  5. # vimeo.com/66304111 Uploaded 1,670 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

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