1. Video about exhibiton Future Generation Art Prize at palazzo Contarini Polignac, Venice.

    # vimeo.com/70346809 Uploaded 254 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. Jenny Holzer is considered as one of the most popular contemporary artists. Holzer is known for her use of words and ideas in public space. In 1982 she publicised her statements and aphorisms (“truisms”) on one of Times Square’s gigantic LED billboards, in 2008 she created a site-specific light projection for the newly renovated facade of the Solomon R. Guggenheim museum in New York.

    Slovak national gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia, is now presenting Jenny Holzer’s first large sale exhibition in a Slovak museum. On display are Jenny Holzer’s famous LED installations, combining poetic, socio-critical, and political texts and visual effects, as welll as paintings and sculptures.

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  3. Why would an artist change his signature style after proven success? Walking the graffiti-filled streets of his Greenpoint neighborhood and working in his nearby Williamsburg studio, Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez discusses the motivation to shift his paintings from Pop-like figurations to pared down abstractions. An active graffiti artist in his teens and twenties, Martinez describes both the allure and difficulty of graffiti’s inherent riskiness, and reveals how his work now is an equally risky endeavor, artistically and professionally. A montage of Martinez’s previous paintings —brightly colored and unabashedly representational paintings of flowerpots and cartoonish characters—exemplifies the prodigious output that brought him commercial attention and success, but now represents a style he “feels wholly committed to abandoning.” Despite the expectations of his gallery and collectors, Martinez says, “It’s just impossible for me to keep making the same image I made six years ago.” He describes how he’s both excited and frightened to forge a fully abstract style, to paint without easy reliance on old imagery. Months afterwards the results of Martinez’s stylistic shift—near mural-sized canvases of primary colored forms set against open white backgrounds—are shown on exhibition at The Journal Gallery in Brooklyn. For Martinez, the change was a necessary leap of faith, one he hopes his followers will continue to support.

    Eddie Martinez (b. 1977, Groton, Connecticut) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Learn more about the artist at:
    art21.org/newyorkcloseup/artists/eddie-martinez/

    CREDITS | New York Close Up Created & Produced by: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Editor: Mary Ann Toman. Cinematography: John Marton, Nick Ravich, & Rafael Moreno Salazar. Sound: Nick Ravich. Associate Producer: Ian Forster. Design & Graphics: Stephanie Andreou, Crux Studio & Open. Artwork: Eddie Martinez. Thanks: Franny, Sara Hantman, Emilia Olsen, The Journal Gallery. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved.

    New York Close Up is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; Toby Devan Lewis; Lambent Foundation; the Dedalus Foundation, Inc.; and the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc. Additional support provided by The 1896 Studios & Stages, and by individual contributors.

    # vimeo.com/67905209 Uploaded 6,026 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  4. What happens to an artist’s work after it leaves a museum? Artist Marela Zacarías moves a suite of sculptures titled "Supple Beat" from the Brooklyn Museum to different spaces in the borough. At Zacarías’s Gowanus, Brooklyn studio it’s evident that the space she has to create and store her large-scale works in is extremely limited—a stark contrast to the museum’s wide-open Grand Lobby where "Supple Beat" is being exhibited (as part of the museum’s on-going "Raw/Cooked" series.) Zacarías and a crew of art handlers led by Collections Manager Walter Andersons deinstall four of the sculptures. Constructed in carefully conceived parts, their painted geometric patterns cover window screen and joint compound understructures. Zacarías shares her inspiration: the Willamsburg Murals that were created in the late 1930s for a Brooklyn public housing complex and painted directly on walls in common areas. Overtime, they were neglected and covered up, but eventually restored and moved to the museum where they are on long-term loan. Zacarías describes how this poignant story reflects her feelings about her own work—formally and emotionally resistant to their surroundings, literally “running out from confinement.” After the deinstallation, Zacarías and a group of friends deliver the sculptures to new but temporary homes. Three of them are stored in a do-it-yourself-style storage space in Gowanus, and the fourth, "163–213 Manhattan" (2013), is taken to a friend’s loft in Williamsburg. As Zacarías and her crew install the work in this compact space (yet another contrast to the museum) she reflects on this fitting end: "163–213 Manhattan" now has a home in Williamsburg like the murals that inspired it. And like those murals, the Williamsburg location is probably only a temporary resting place for Zacarías’s sculpture. Also featuring the works "122-192 Bushwick" (2013), "202-254 Graham" (2013), and "215-274 Humboldt" (2013).

    Marela Zacarías (b. 1978, Mexico City, Mexico) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Learn more about the artist at:
    art21.org/newyorkcloseup/artists/marela-zacarias/

    CREDITS | "New York Close Up" Created & Produced by: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Producer & Editor: Rafael Salazar & Ava Wiland. Cinematography: Rafael Salazar, Ava Wiland & Nick Ravich. Sound: Nick Ravich & Ava Wiland. Associate Producer: Ian Forster. Design & Graphics: Crux Studio & Open. Artwork: Marela Zacarías. Music: Los Músicos de Jose. Thanks: Michael Aitken, Walter Andersons, Brooklyn Museum, Angela Jann, LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, Steven McClure, New York City Housing Authority, Alex Nuñez (A.K.A. DJ Miami Heat), Isaac Parker, Weston Pew, Ben Pomeroy, Michael Roopenian, Eugenie Tsai, Sally Williams, Jeffrey Wisotsky. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved.

    "New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; Lambent Foundation; Toby Devan Lewis; the Dedalus Foundation, Inc. Additional support provided by The 1896 Studios & Stages, and by individual contributors.

    MARELA ZACARÍAS, "SUPPLE BEAT"
    brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/raw_cooked_zacarias/

    THE WILLIAMSBURG MURALS
    brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/williamsburg_murals/

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  5. How do you create an epic tale from modest materials? At her temporary studio and home in Campbell Hall, located in upstate New York, artist Laleh Khorramian surveys the last ten years of her animated videos. In her studio she is surrounded by piles of found scrap paper and graphics as well as her own drawings, paintings, and monotypes—all source material for her animations. Khorramian has found the monotype process, in which unique prints are created by pressing paper over painted surfaces, particularly generative. In films like "Sophie & Goya" (2004) and "Chopperlady" (2005), her monotypes become vast subterranean landscapes through which animated figures travel and explore. Scale in these films is uncanny; the figures appear both larger than life and barely visible. Alongside family photos from her many childhood trips to Disney World, Khorramian, who grew up in Orlando, Florida, describes her teenage disillusionment with the Magic Kingdom, the realization that Disney’s all-encompassing world of mass entertainment was a huge facade—in her words a “prop”—and more insidiously a form of social control. In "Water Panics in the Sea" (2011) the influence of this epiphany plays out: a giant ship, animated from collaged drawings and paintings, is unapologetically two-dimensional as it crosses an equally flat but menacing sea. The overall effect is disturbing, dystopian, and tragic. The boat, seemingly half human and half machine, is trapped on the water, engaged in some epic yet completely obscure journey. Also featuring the animations "I Without End" (2008) and "Liuto Golis" (2010).

    Laleh Khorramian (b. 1974, Tehran, Iran) lives and works in New York. Learn more about the artist at:
    art21.org/newyorkcloseup/artists/laleh-khorramian/

    CREDITS | "New York Close Up" Created & Produced by: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Editor: Morgan Riles & Mary Ann Toman. Cinematography: John Marton, Wesley Miller, & Nick Ravich. Sound: Nick Ravich. Associate Producer: Ian Forster. Design & Graphics: Crux Studio & Open. Artwork: Laleh Khorramian. Music: Shahzad Ismaily. Thanks: Saira Ansari, Dylan, Heartland, Dina Ibrahim, Jamie Manza, Paul Manza, Adeeb Mohiuddin, The Third Line. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved.

    "New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; Lambent Foundation; Toby Devan Lewis; the Dedalus Foundation, Inc. Additional support provided by The 1896 Studios & Stages, and by individual contributors.

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    VIDEOS

    "Sophie & Goya" (2004)
    vimeo.com/66710881

    "Chopperlady" (2005)
    vimeo.com/67049675

    "Water Panics in the Sea" (2011)
    vimeo.com/66715070

    "I Without End" (2008)
    vimeo.com/66562328

    "Liuto Golis" (2010)
    vimeo.com/67114939

    # vimeo.com/68859685 Uploaded 3,049 Plays / / 1 Comment Watch in Couch Mode

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