1. Aubie Asks @ the Libraries!

    If it hasn’t happened yet, it most likely will. Your professor assigns a paper but says “Don’t use Google for your sources, use a library database.” What’s the difference? No matter if you use Google, or Yahoo, or Bing, you’re going to find some good things on the web. Examples include news, blogs, opinion and the ever popular Wikipedia.

    You must be careful though when you gather your sources from a search engine such as Google for your paper. This is because the web has no review process. So this means you’ll need to check to see if the sources are credible and reliable, check the authority, such as who wrote the article or information. You’re also going to find tons of stuff to go through and you may be asked to pay.

    Using a library database is different. Most of the information has gone through some type of review process. Also, the information is free to you as an Auburn student. And finally, one of the biggest advantages of using library database is that the information is much more specific- so you don’t have to sift through millions of pages. This means you can narrow your searches much more efficiently. If you are interested in a particular topic, there’s probably a database that covers that in depth.

    So if you need sources for your paper, try a library database and if you need more help, ask a librarian. Remember our email address askalibrarian@auburn.edu.

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  2. You may find citations and lists called references, works cited, or bibliographies. They can also be in many formats such as MLA and APA, or even Chicago-style. Yes, Chicago-style. Regardless of the style you use, most citations contain the same types of information. We are going to look at three of the most common types of citations: books, articles & essays in books, and journal & magazine articles.

    Let’s begin by looking at books. In a citation for a book, you will see an author’s name, a date of publication, the title of the book (oftentimes in italics), the city of publication, and the publishing company. Essays and articles in books are a little different. Here, you will have the authors of the essay or article listed, the date of publication of the book, the title of the essay or article (the word “in” is a good indicator that it is an essay or article in a book), the editors of the book, the title of the book (oftentimes in italics), sometimes the edition of the book and the pages of the article or essay, the city of publication, and the publishing company. Now let’s look at journal and magazine articles. Here we have the authors of the article, the date of publication, the title of the article, the title of the magazine or journal (often in italics), a volume number and sometimes issue number, and page numbers of the article. If you ever have trouble reading a citation, ask a librarian or your professor. Remember our e-mail address: askalibrarian@auburn.edu.

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  3. Aubie Asks @ the Libraries!

    If you’ve ever had trouble looking up library items, this video will give you tips on how to search the library’s catalog. Accessed from the library’s home page, the catalog consists of a search box and a drop down menu of fields that you can search. Some of the items you can search for include books, journals, magazines and newspapers, music scores, maps, visual materials and items in special collections.

    Let’s search for a book titled 'The Language of the Heart: the Body’s Response to Human Dialogue.’ First, we’ll type the title in the search box. We do not need to use articles such as ‘a,’ ‘an,’ and ‘the’ at the beginning of the search. We’ll then choose from the drop down menu ‘title’ as in a book title. The results show that we do have this book. It’s actually available at this call number on the 4th floor and it is available rather than checked out.

    Now I would like to find this article. Rather than searching for the article title however, I search for the journal in which it’s published. So, I type in the journal title which is ‘Pediatric Neurology’ and instead of ‘title,’ I will select ‘journal title’ from the drop down. I have two options. Most people go for the electronic option first, so let’s check that out. You’ll see that we have it electronically from 1995 to present. But we need 1992! So, now I’ll try the other option. Again, I see the electronic but now I see that we have it print from 1989 to 1993 - just what I need, and the call number- on the 4th floor.

    You may choose to search the classic catalog or to conduct a keyword search. In the keyword search, you would enter your keywords such as ‘pediatric neurology’ and you could also add other terms to search along with this. You can limit by year, collection, place of publication and other fields.

    If you ever have trouble finding books or other items in the library’s catalog, ask a librarian. Remember our email address - askalibrarian@auburn.edu

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  4. From the university website, simply click on “Libraries.” This will take you to the libraries’ website. Notice the tabs at the top for “find” to find materials, “services” where you can see the services that we offer, “about the libraries” (here you can contact us), the library hours for all of our libraries, and “ask a librarian”. Under “ask a librarian”, you can e-mail us and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can, call us, or you can chat with us live.

    To search the libraries’ catalog for books, journals, movies, or music, simply type in your terms and select your field to search. Or, you may choose to do a keyword search. To find articles, click on “articles and databases”. You have several options. Databases by subject will provide you with a long list of subjects. When you select one, such as Foreign Languages and Literatures, you will be provided with databases pertaining to that particular subject. Under “subject guides,” notice the link to subject specialist librarians. Also, subject list--this will again provide you with a long list of subjects. When you click on one, such as nursing, you will be taken to a guide that will help you do research in that particular field. And don’t forget the quick links to “renew books,” “reserves,” “textbooks reserves,” and “Interlibrary Loan.” Take advantage of the libraries’ website: lib.auburn.edu. Remember our e-mail address: askalibrarian@auburn.edu.

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  5. Aubie Asks @ the Libraries!

    Have you ever been searching a library database and found the perfect article and you just can’t get to it? This video will show you how to locate the full text of articles.

    First, you may do a search and find the link to a PDF or HTML file. This takes you straight to the full text. Or you may do a search and not find the link to a PDF or HTML file. In this case, click on Article Linker. You will then be taken to a page where you’ll find information about the article. Here you will find a link to the full text.

    In Scenario #3, you’ll again need to click on Article Linker. You’ll see that there is an electronic copy of the article available. You’ll just need to click on a link to get to it. You’ll then be taken to the journal website where you may choose the volume and issue that you need.

    In the next scenario, you’ll again click on Article Linker. There is no electronic copy but there may be a print copy available. There is a print copy! But in order to find it, you will need to know the floor and the call number.

    In the last scenario, you again must click on Article Linker. There is no electronic version but there may be a print version. Well, there’s not. You do have one more option though and that’s to place a Interlibrary Loan request for the article.

    So don’t get discouraged when looking for the full text. Try Article Linker or AskaLibrarian. Remember our email address, askalibrarian@auburn.edu.

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