Documentary Film

  1. Produced 2012 by Uncage the Soul Productions
    Ben Canales, John Waller, Steve Engman, Blake Johnson
    uncagethesoul.com

    To plan your adventure to Portland, visit Travel Portland at
    travelportland.com

    Finding Portland was produced, shot, and edited in 51 days during March and April at the invitation of TEDx Portland, where the video was unveiled to a sell out crowd of 650 and met with a standing ovation. Filmed in Portland and the Columbia Gorge, this time-lapse piece offers a new perspective to the City of Roses. From a Portland Timbers season opening soccer game, to the top of the Fremont Bridge, to an aerial shot of Oneonta Gorge, Finding Portland tells the story of a city and its many faces.

    Comprised of 308, 829 photographs taken from over 50 unique locations, it took an average of 3.8 hours to make each second of this film. The intent of the project was to place our cameras in unique locations across the city, achieve significant ranges of dynamic camera motion, and pursue cutting edge time-lapse techniques.

    Behind the scenes video and photos are posted at
    uncagethesoul.com/news/finding-portland-timelapse

    The entire TEDx Portland presentation of Finding Portland by John Waller and Ben Canales will be online in May at tedxportland.com

    Many thanks to those who supported us in this project including...

    Original Music Composition by Peter Bosack
    peterbosackmusic.com

    Pro Photo Supply...still and video camera and audio equipment support
    prophotosupply.com

    Dynamic Perception...motion time-lapse systems
    dynamicperception.com

    Aerial Technology International...remote aerial video and photography
    nw-aero-pix.com
    aerialtechnology.com

    Cam Block Modular Motion Control
    camblock.com

    Reposted Here:

    Discovery
    dsc.discovery.com/adventure/portland-as-youve-never-seen-it-before-300000-photo-time-lapse-video.html

    Huffington Post
    huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/25/new-time-lapse-video-shows-best-of-portland_n_1452680.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009

    Social Soundtrack
    socialsoundtrack.com/finding-portland/

    # vimeo.com/41011190 Uploaded 1M Plays / / 285 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  2. Un film de Didier Buffet - Fabrication de l'Huile de Noix dans la commune d'Anglefort (Ain)

    This movie is in French. Sorry for those who don't understand. This is the meeting with two men. One is a retired farmer and the other one a retired entrepreneur. They decided to make walnut oil for their neighbors around. People bring the walnuts kernels and the Oil millers transform it into oil through a very old and traditional process. Kernels of walnuts are mashed and roasted like coffee beans. The Roasting gives the oil its fine taste. Without roasting the oil would be flavorless. After that walnuts are pressed to obtain the precious oil. The do the same operation several times until the walnuts are completely dry. People don't pay the oil, they pay for a certain weight of walnuts kernels. These two guys are the last ones to work following a long tradition and dozens of generations. Please encourage them in your message even if they don't speak english, they will understand...;-) Thank you...

    Here is on Google map where they are :
    maps.google.fr/maps?client=safari&q=anglefort&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&hl=fr

    # vimeo.com/37988673 Uploaded 9,474 Plays / / 1 Comment Watch in Couch Mode
  3. Guitar Crafting in Burgundy - France

    # vimeo.com/39660001 Uploaded 9,895 Plays / / 5 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  4. What makes a great story? For legendary filmmaker Ken Burns, the answer is both complicated and personal. In this short documentary about the craft of storytelling, he explains his lifelong mission to wake the dead. Recently featured on The Atlantic. (theatlantic.com/video/archive/2012/05/ken-burns-on-story/257165/)

    Directed by Tom Mason and Sarah Klein
    Music by Ryan Sayward Whittier
    Animation by Elliot Cowan

    Transcript for Closed Captioning
    Ken Burns On Story Transcription

    You know the common story is one plus one equals two, we get it. But all stories are really, the real genuine stories, are about one and one equaling three. That’s what I’m interested in.

    We live in a rational world where absolutely we’re certain that one and one equals two, and it does. But the things that matter most to us, some people call it love, some people call it God, some people call it reason, is that other thing where the whole is greater than the some of its parts, and that’s the three.
    Oh great story, they are everywhere. There are millions of them! Abraham Lincoln wins the Civil War and then he decides he’s got enough time to go to the theater. That’s a good story. When Thomas Jefferson said we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, he owned a hundred human beings and never saw the hypocrisy, never saw the contradiction, and more important, never saw fit in his lifetime to free any one of them. That’s a good story. You know the stories that I like to tell are always interesting because the good guys have really serious flaws and the villains are very compelling. My interest is always in complicating things.

    Jean Luc Goddard said cinema is truth 24 times a second. Maybe. It’s lying 24 times a second too, all the time, all story is manipulation. Is there acceptable manipulation? You bet. People say oh boy, I was so moved to tears in your film. That’s a good thing? That was, I manipulated that. That’s part of storytelling. I didn’t do it dis-genuinely, I did it sincerely, I am moved by that too, that’s manipulation. Truth is we hope a byproduct of the best of our stories and yet there are many, many different kinds of truths and an emotional truth is something that you have to build.

    I made a film on baseball once and it seemed to me that there was a dilemma for the racist of what to do about Jackie Robinson. If you were a Brooklyn Dodger fan and you were a racist, what do you do when he arrives? You can quit baseball all together, you can change teams, or you can change. And I think that the kind of narrative that I subscribe trusts in the possibility that people could change. I hope it’s a positive version of manipulation, but I do think that we do coalesce around stories that seem transcendent.

    I don’t know why I tell stories about history I mean there’s kind of classic dime-store Ken Burns wolf-at-the door things, my mother had cancer all of my life, she died when I was 11, there wasn’t a moment from when I was aware, two-and-a-half, three, that there was something dreadfully wrong in my life. It might be that what I’m engaged in, in a historical pursuit is a thin layer perhaps thickly disguised waking of the dead, that I try to make Abraham Lincoln and Jackie Robinson and Louis Armstrong come alive and it maybe very obvious and very close to home who I’m actually trying to wake up. We have to keep the wolf from the door, you know, we tell stories to continue ourselves. We all think an exception is going to be made in our case and we’re going to live forever, and being a human is actually arriving at the understanding that that’s not going to be, story is there to just remind us that it’s just okay.

    # vimeo.com/40972394 Uploaded 146K Plays / / 81 Comments Watch in Couch Mode
  5. For many, a bowl of rice is a simple trip to the supermarket. Rarely do we think about the production of our food. The documentary shows a typical day in the life of a rice farmer and the laborious process of rice farming. You can see how well-connected the whole system is and the number of parties involved in farming rice. The way in which the farmer gently treats his animals illustrates the importance of every single life and how it is part of a greater system.
From cultivation to sale the visuals give you a sense of the strenuous, manual and monotonous work in the rice paddies. Every action has an intention – the self-grown rice is used to feed the fishes, which will be caught and cooked for dinner. Every step and actor in the process is part of an efficient, self-sustaining system.
    The simplicity of the video appeals to your senses and gives the viewer a real understanding of these conditions. You are transported into another world by listening to the original sounds. Commentary or music are not necessary to complete the documentary. This is not only a video, it‘s an experience!

    camera: alexander baumgartner
    sound: isabelle baumgartner
    film editing: alexander baumgartner
    sound design: ferdinand feifel

    special thanks to:

    the family barque
    don bosco foundation for sustainable development
    gaspard weisheimer
    isabelle baumgartner
    haiggi baumgartner
    eckard grundmann

    # vimeo.com/41020039 Uploaded 30.3K Plays / / 32 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

Documentary Film

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