Earth and Environmental Sciences

Remote Triggering of Slow Slip Earthquakes
Zhigang Peng, Georgia Institute of Technology

One of the most exciting findings in earthquake sciences in the past decade is the discovery of slow-slip earthquakes. These events generally occur at the deeper portions of active faults, and slip at much slower rates than regular shadow earthquakes. In most cases they are accompanied by weak continuous seismic events that are now termed ‘deep tectonic tremor’. Tremor has been observed at major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. It is highly stress sensitive and can be triggered by subtle stress perturbations from large distant earthquakes and solid earth tides. Here I conduct a global search of deep tremor triggered during large-amplitude surface waves of large distant earthquakes. In many cases, triggered tremor is found at relatively young subduction zones such as southwest Japan or Cascadia, and mature strike-slip faults with compressional components like the San Andreas Fault. In comparison, shallow small earthquakes are mostly triggered in volcanic or extensional environments. I also find that deep tremor is more easily triggered than shallow microearthquakes, likely due to very high fluid pressure at depth. Finally I discuss how remote triggering of regular and slow earthquakes could help to better understand possible interactions of large distant earthquakes.

Background Review Article:
Vidale, John E., and Heidi Houston. "Slow slip: A new kind of earthquake." Physics Today 65.1 (2012): 38-43.

# vimeo.com/114264045 Uploaded 1 Play / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Kavli Frontiers of Science PRO

This channel contains session presentations that cover earth science and environmental science topics from the Kavli Frontiers of Science symposium series of the National Academy of Sciences.

For additional symposium information, please visit our web


+ More

This channel contains session presentations that cover earth science and environmental science topics from the Kavli Frontiers of Science symposium series of the National Academy of Sciences.

For additional symposium information, please visit our web site (nasonline.org/kfos).

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels. Channels