The Human Projector

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  3. Exercise for Experimental Animation at Swarthmore College, Fall 2012. Looped 3-second short using human pixilation, inspired by Gary Beydler's "Pasadena Freeway Stills" (1974). Made using Dragonframe.

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  4. Shot on a Canon EOS Rebel T3i and assembled in Dragonframe.

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The Human Projector

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"I wanted to be a human projector." – Gary Beydler, artist & filmmaker

“Possibly the most lucid, vivid and awesome demonstration of the building up of still images to create moving ones, Pasadena Freeway Stills simply, gracefully and powerfully shows


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"I wanted to be a human projector." – Gary Beydler, artist & filmmaker

“Possibly the most lucid, vivid and awesome demonstration of the building up of still images to create moving ones, Pasadena Freeway Stills simply, gracefully and powerfully shows us the process by which we are fooled by the movies.” -Mark Toscano, Academy Film Archive

The first project completed in FMST13: Experimental Animation course taught by Erica Cho. Swarthmore College Fall 2012.

Objective: Make a minimum 3-second animated video using flipbook, stop-motion, and pixillation processes after Pasadena Freeway Stills (16mm, color, silent, 6 min., 1974), a film made by the California Conceptual artist Gary Beydler (1942-2010).

Timeframe = 2 weeks
Due = Thursday, 9/20/12

"I had one of my graduate students drive the car, and I filmed 16mm black and white negative driving through these four consecutive tunnels on the Pasadena freeway. I wound up doing about 1400 paper prints from the individual frames in the negative. I mounted a piece of glass in my garage, with a square of tape marked out on it. I sat down behind the glass with a white T-shirt on and started shooting the stills. My wife Sarah shot the first part, and as the shots got shorter and shorter, I shot it myself using a bulb hooked up to the camera that I operated with my foot. I originally meant to shut it off and fade it out to end it, but while I was shooting, I decided instead to reverse the procedure, slowing the shots back down. I called Sarah back to shoot the last part. I always had the idea of sound, but I could never figure out what the heck kind of sound to have in this film.” (Gary Beydler, 2008) 


"Constructed as a thrilling arc of realization and, in a quite moving way, disappointment, the film is a beautiful articulation of our emotional entanglement with moving images, while simultaneously creating a form in which the illusion of cinema is brought into incredible relief as the film we're watching gradually catches up to the film Gary is holding up to the camera with his hands, one frame at a time." (Mark Toscano, Academy Film Archive)

Sources:

Lord, Benjamin. “Gary Bedler.” XTRA. Spring 2011, Volume 13, Number 3
x-traonline.org/current_articles.php?articleID=416

Handheld Day (dir. Gary Beydler / 1975)
youtube.com/watch?v=KpkYp56Yf1I

canyoncinema.com/catalog/film/?i=4325&phpMyAdmin=Yjvji%2CgVQkRzA68eQi03vIFlut0

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