Xen

  1. This demo was shown as part of the following Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit talk. The slides for the talk can be seen at slideshare.net/xen_com_mgr/xen-automotive-rc2

    The presentation will cover Xen vs Xen Automotive gaps and analysis. We will elaborate technical solutions for the identified gaps:
    * ARM architecture - support HW virtualization extensions for embedded systems
    * Stability requirements
    * RT Scheduler
    * Rich virtualized peripheral support (WiFi, Gfx, MM, USB, etc.)
    * Performance benchmarking
    * Security

    The audience is anyone interesting in building OSS based IVI systems. Attendees can expect the OSS stack detailed architecture, current status of the project, the challenges seen, road map and much more.

    # vimeo.com/90534015 Uploaded 32 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  2. Shared under CC BY : Credit to FSODEM 2014 and its sponsors for recording the videos and making them available.

    Embedded systems are becoming powerful enough that virtualization is now both possible and interesting. Xen, as a very tiny microkernel based hypervisor looks like a very good fit for the embedded environment, not to mention that it has been ported to ARM with the number of supported boards in constant increase.

    This talk will outline the major strengths of the Xen architecture, when it comes to use Xen on embedded systems. It will also identify and discuss the areas where there is still room for improvement. It will go through preliminary experimental results on assessing some of the typical real-time requirements (such as responsiveness and predictability), for the benefit of everyone out there that would like to build its embedded product on top of Xen.

    On the concrete side, we will show how to setup an 'Andorid on Xen' environment, which results from a fruitful collaboration between the Xen community and other interested parties from the Android community. We think this could be very useful as an example for anyone interested in working with us, with the aim of being successful in the embedded virtualization product space.

    Full description: The goal of this talk is twofold: - provide a general enough view of the Xen architecture, focusing on

    why it could be particularly well suited for the embedded virtualization usecases show how the Xen community is tackling this new challenge, trying to involve all the (potentially) interesting parties and reaching the highest possible levels of cross-project collaboration

    # vimeo.com/90248265 Uploaded 44 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  3. Shared under CC BY : Credit to FSODEM 2014 and its sponsors for recording the videos and making them available.

    Public compute clouds provide a flexible platform to host applications as a set of appliances, e.g., web servers or databases. Each appliance usually contains an OS kernel and userspace processes, within which applications access resources via APIs such as POSIX. The flexible architecture of the cloud comes at a cost: the addition of another layer in the already complex software stack. This reduces performance and increases the size of the trusted computing base.

    Our Mirage operating system proposes a radically different way of building these appliances. Mirage supports the progressive specialisation of functional language (OCaml) application source code, and gradually replaces traditional OS components with type-safe libraries. This ultimately results in "unikernels": sealed, fixed-purpose images that run directly on a hypervisor without an intervening guest OS such as Linux.

    Developers can write their code using their usual tools, only making the final push to the cloud once they are satisfied their code works. As they explicitly link in components that would normally be provided by the host OS, the resulting unikernels are also highly compact: facilities that are not used are simply not included in the resulting unikernel. For example, the self-hosting Mirage web server image is less than a megabyte in size!

    We will describe the architecture of Mirage in the talk, show some code examples, and interesting benchmark results that compare the performance of our unikernels to traditional applications such as Apache, BIND and OpenSSH.

    # vimeo.com/90245802 Uploaded 9 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  4. Shared under CC BY : Credit to FSODEM 2014 and its sponsors for recording the videos and making them available

    Xen has recently gained a new guest type called PVH and it can run as both DomU and Dom0. This talk will focus on the architecture of PVH and the interface exposed to guest OSes in order to run under this mode.

    Also, examples will be provided about how we ported FreeBSD to run under this new virtualization mode.

    The goal of this talk is to provide information about the PVH architecture, and to encourage other OS hackers to port their OSes to PVH.

    Description of the PVH architecture:

    Why was PVH introduced?
    * Differences between PV, PVHVM and PVH.
    * Description of the current PVH interface.
    * Practical example: changes in FreeBSD in order to run as PVH:

    How does FreeBSD make use of the PVH interfaces.
    * The road so far: from HVM to PVH, a progressive implementation.
    * General tips about best ways to add PVH support to an existing OS..

    # vimeo.com/90245800 Uploaded 8 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

  5. Shared under CC BY : Credit to FSODEM 2014 and its sponsors for recording the videos and making them available.

    Middleboxes are both crucial to today's networks and ubiquitous, but embed knowledge of today's protocols and applications to the detriment of those of tomorrow, making the network harder to evolve. While virtualization technologies like Xen have been around for a long time, it is only in recent years that they have started to be targeted as viable systems for implementing middlebox processing (e.g., firewalls, NATs).

    Can they provide this functionality while yielding the high performance expected from hardware-based middlebox offerings? In this talk Joao Martins will introduce ClickOS, a tiny, MiniOS-based virtual machine tailored for network processing. In addition to the vm itself, this talk will hopefully help to clarify where some of the bottlenecks in Xen's network I/O pipe are, and describe performance improvements done to the entire system. Finally, Joao Martins will discuss an evaluation showing that ClickOS can be instantiated in 30 msecs, can process traffic at 10Gb/s for almost all packet sizes, introduces delay of only 40 microseconds and can run middleboxes at rates of 5 Mp/s. The audience is anyone interested in improving the network performance of Xen, including improvements to the MiniOS and Linux netfront drivers. In addition, the talk should interest people working towards running large numbers of small virtual machines for network processing, as well as those involved with the recent network function virtualization trend.

    The outline of this talk and goals for this session:

    showing a new use-case for virtualization, targeting virtual machines as replacement for hardware middleboxes
    * requirements and our solution to this problem
    * what is Click and how we program middleboxes in Click
    * what is ClickOS and our contributions
    * network processing under XEN, and bottlenecks in the I/O pipe
    * how packet processing performance was improved
    * initialization, memory usage and synchronization between backend/frontend
    * delay and throughput evaluation using high numbers of VMs
    * performance of some middleboxes (load balancers, firewalls, intrusion detection systems, etc)
    * conclusions and remarks

    # vimeo.com/90245797 Uploaded 10 Plays / / 0 Comments Watch in Couch Mode

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Xen

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Xen is an open-source type-1 or baremetal hypervisor, which makes it possible to run many instances of an operating system or indeed different operating systems in parallel on a single machine (or host). Xen is the only type-1 hypervisor that is available as open source. Xen is used as the basis for a number of different commercial and open source applications, such as: server virtualization, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS),


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Xen is an open-source type-1 or baremetal hypervisor, which makes it possible to run many instances of an operating system or indeed different operating systems in parallel on a single machine (or host). Xen is the only type-1 hypervisor that is available as open source. Xen is used as the basis for a number of different commercial and open source applications, such as: server virtualization, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), desktop virtualization, security applications, embedded and hardware appliances. Xen is powering the largest clouds in production today.

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