Native Art and Craft

In Fryslân there is a cultural-historical competition to find the first lapwing egg of the year. This visual poem captures the spirit of a tradition, which is bound for extinction.

I made this film in admiration of my father. When I was a little boy he took me into the meadows to find eggs. I still remember the beauty of the landscape, the sound of the birds and the excitement when we found eggs. Sadly we never found the first egg. I also remember the cold of the wind and tired feelings in my small legs. Often asking my father to carry me on his back.

Official selection ZEBRA Poetry Film Festival in Berlin 2014 literaturwerkstatt.org/en/zebra-poetry-film-festival/programm-2014-neu/prisma/kopfzerbrechen
Official participation International Film Poetry Festival 2013 in Athens Greece voidnetwork.blogspot.nl/2013/12/international-film-poetry-festival-2.html
Official selection Northern Film Festival 2013 'Nieuwe Noordelijke Oogst' noordelijkfilmfestival.nl
Official selection Ó Bhéal IndieCork International Poetry-Film Competition 2013, Ireland obheal.ie indiecork.com
Screened on the North Light Arts Film Poem Festival 2013 festival, Dunbar Scotland northlightarts.org.uk/2013/08/filmpoem-festival
Featured on friesfilmarchief.nl/producties/gedichtenclips/jeugd
Featured on movingpoems.com/filmmaker/richard-van-der-laan
Featured on forum.magazinevideo.com/topic/26807-un-frisson-cinematographique

DISCLAIMER: No real eggs were harmed during the making of this film. We only used empty egg shells. My father stopped collecting eggs years ago.

Gathering lapwing eggs is prohibited by the European Union, but Fryslân (a northern province of the Netherlands) was granted an exception for cultural-historical reasons. The Frisian exception was removed in 2005 by a court, which determined that the Frisian executive councillors had not properly followed procedure. As of 2006 it is again allowed to look for lapwing eggs between 1 March and 9 April, though harvesting those eggs is now forbidden.

Lapwings belong in meadows. The name lapwing describes the sound its broad wings make when in flight. Lapwings are also known as peewits, thanks to their shrill call. They are very vocal during mating season and have glorious courting rituals in the air. In the spring, the male makes several simple hollows in the ground and the female chooses one to make brood her eggs in. Both males and females brood the eggs and care for the chicks. Should their nest with chicks be threatened, they will defend their young with all their might. Sometimes, you see them flying after a harrier, constantly attacking the raptor. If it really gets serious, they will pretend to have a broken wing, luring the predator away from the nest.

The Frisian languages are a closely related group of Germanic languages, spoken by about 500,000 members of Frisian ethnic groups, who live on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany. The Frisian languages are the second closest living languages to English, after Scots.
Filmed at Vegelinsoord (West Frisian: Vegelinsoard) a small village in Skarsterlân in the province Fryslân of the Netherlands.

Camera / Production : Richard van der Laan
Egg collector : Hans van der Laan
Poem writer / reading : Siem de Vlas
Sound recording : Richard van der Laan
Sound design : Maarten Boogerman

Camera : Panasonic GH2 AVC-Intra Driftwood VY Canis Majoris Day
Lens : Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f2.8 G ED
Gear : Sachtler FSB-4 75 CF, Gini Follow Focus Rig, Lilliput monitor
Audio : Roland R-26, Rode NTG-2

j vimeo.com/62768855

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