BOOOOOOOM

“I like the term “You are here” on maps in public spaces, for example train stations.
The reading of these words causes a distance: I‘m located in real space, standing in front of a map while looking at the assertion You are here. This gap between me and the word you (actually: me) interests me.

Cartographers in Jorges Luis Borges‘ story On Exactitude in Science want to avoid the gap between territory and map that originates from transmissing spatial information into graphical signs and codes. The cartographers aim is to create a map which is as precise as the territory. The necessary consequence: the map has to have the same size as the territory. Every part of the territory is covered by the map. The map becomes the territory itself.
A map has to be flexible: in order to stay up to date it has to change it‘s shapes and contents as often as possible.

While walking through the city, I often imagine myself watching the scene from the bird‘s-eye view. I see myself as a red dot in the streets. I‘m in situ and at the same time observing my own actions from another perspective. In my head I constantly shift between three-dimensional space and two-dimensional visualization – virtual and real space overlap.

During my four-week stay in Berlin, I‘d like to work on a growing papercut installation that combines different visualizations of my surrounding area. I‘m planning to work with several kinds of maps: self drawn maps of the area, pictures that I take in my neighbourhood, maps I find on the Internet.
My main material will be paper and a scalpel. Every day I‘ll chart, draw, photograph and google my sourrounding. I‘m going to cut one piece of the installation per day and put it into the working space. The more papercuts, the less orientation.”

Sandra Kühne, Berlin
munkenworks.com/

j vimeo.com/72480448

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