1. Munich Leadership Conference Trailer

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    from Hollywedd / Added

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    Trailer of the Munich Leadership Conference 2015 and the Vision Y Project. This project was processed by the Munich Leadership Institut and the Center of Digital Technology and Management (CDTM). The Vision Y Project was supported by multiple thought leaders (i.e. Muhammad Yunus, Dr. Klaus Töpfer, Juliana Rotich, Frank Schätzing and Bill McDermott). To find out more about the Vision Y Project and the Munich Leadership Conference visit the website: www.leadership-conference.de

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    • Inside Kenya's iHub

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      from Design Indaba / Added

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      View more inspiring videos like this one at http://www.designindaba.com/video If you want to know what’s happening in the digital and tech space in Kenya, pay a visit to the iHub in Nairobi. Established in 2010, it has become “ground zero” for digital innovation in East Africa, an open space for technologists, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and business people to network, collaborate and work on new ideas. The iHub was established by Erik Hersman and Juliana Rotich of Ushahidi, the global non-profit technology company and platform for crowd-sourced data mapping. “This is where the investors are, this is where the start-ups come, this is where the media come to find their stories about who’s building what, and it’s really this melting pot of all the right people and the right things around technology in the country,” says Hersman. Through its own groundbreaking digital platform, the team at Ushahidi soon realised that using technology to facilitate development is a great way to galvanise communities into action. There’s always something going on inside the light and airy centre on the fourth story of a building that houses numerous other tech headquarters. Each level of the building fills a unique niche in the local creative economy: the third floor features m:Lab East Africa, a modern facility aimed at providing a more extensive working environment for mobile developers; the iHub Research department is located on the second floor; while Ushahidi and its hardware spin-off BRCK occupy offices on the first. Hersman says: “Our job, we found out later after we built [the iHub], is really just to engineer the serendipity to make sure that people come together and good things happen.” Designindaba.com hosts hundreds of videos of speaker presentations and interviews and world design news. Updated daily, its content features the most cutting-edge design thinking and the work and ideas of the world's industry leaders in all the creative fields. Design Indaba is a multi-tiered platform committed to a better world through creativity. Established in 1995 with its flagship conference, it has evolved into a multidisciplinary experience that now consists of the globally acclaimed annual Design Indaba Conference, Simulcast, Expo and FilmFest, as well as a host of parties, performances, training workshops, design projects, community initiatives and publications. http://www.designindaba.com/video

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      • Juliana Rotich on a new tech ecosystem for Africa (trailer)

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        from Design Indaba / Added

        100 Plays / / 0 Comments

        “Africa’s next vanguard is dependent on advancement on many fronts,” says Juliana Rotich on the stage at Design Indaba Conference 2014. But the co-founder and executive director of Ushahidi, anot-for-profit technology firm, is most interested in the frontlines of technology and digital connectivity in Africa. Ushahidi – the Swahili word for “witness” or “testimony” – began as a piece of free and open-source software that allows people to report and share information about what is going on where they are. Using any mobile device, they can contribute information from their area, which is then stored on a central ‘cloud’ and mapped using geo-location. The software was created in response to the dearth of information after post-election fighting forced media houses to shut down in early 2008. The crowd-sourcing tool is now available in more than 30 languages, in more than 159 countries such as Haiti, Japan, Pakistan and Libya. Sharing the tool was key to its growth. We made the code open-source, available on ushahidi.com, which allows citizens to participate, to be part of the process, to say ‘I am here and this is what is going on’, she says. The collective voices of citizens revolutionise the world, Rotich believes. “It is really important to look local, to ask what is going on,” she notes. Rotich advises designers to use function to drive the technology. “It can help us to push the boundary of what is possible with technology,” she says. Given the challenges to connectivity on the African continent, says Rotich, we need to “do what [we] can, with what [we] have, where [we] are”, she quotes Theodore Roosevelt. In this setting, even the hardware we use in Africa needs to be revised. After moving back to Kenya towards end of 2011 to focus on Ushahidi, she grappled with the electricity black-outs that still bedevil the country, making connecting to the Internet unreliable. On top of this is the high cost of making phone calls. So it’s a challenge connecting to other African countries. The Ushahidi team began to ask itself if it couldn’t overcome this problem and reduce the cost of connection. Could we leverage cloud-based technology to reduce the friction of going from one African country to another? she asks. The answer lay in redesigning the modem. “Modems are designed for societies with ubiquitous electricity and decades of existing infrastructure. Why aren’t we using technology that responds to our local context and our local problems?” Ushahidi’s solution – called BRCK – is a rugged way to stay connected but it is also in essence a back-up generator for the Internet. When the electricity goes out, it can leverage 3G networks and it has 8-12 hours of battery life. One of the things the Ushahidi team has learned is that out of adversity can come new ideas and ways of doing things. Underlying their work is the question, “What if solutions to the world’s problems came from Africa?” There is huge potential for connectivity in Africa, where Internet penetration stands at 15.6 percent versus 42.9 percent in South America and 27.5 percent in Asia. And the link between increased connectivity and GDP has been established: a 10 percent increase in broadband corresponds to a 1.163 percent rise in GDP. “Investment in technology, people and creative networks can help us to make sure that Africa’s next vanguard is something that we are part of,” says Rotich. “We are fostering and creating a new ecosystem, a new way of connecting African countries one to each other and a new way of being.”

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        • What connectivity can do for Africa

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          from Design Indaba / Added

          293 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Juliana Rotich is the co-founded Ushahidi, which is the Swahili word for "testimony" a non-profit software company that develops free and open-source software for information collection, visualisation, and interactive mapping. Ushahidi created a website in the aftermath of Kenya's disputed 2007 presidential election that collected eyewitness reports of violence reported by email and text message and placed them on a Google Maps map, create a visual representation in real-time of the crisis. "Ushahidi, the software, allows citizens to share their story, to participate and to report what is going on in their area using the device they have in their pockets," she explains. But Ushahidi also identified the need for steady connectivity, even when infrastructure is spotty due to wireless connections, intermittent power, or devices that can’t share connections. So they set out to redesign connectivity for Africa in the form of the BRCK modem. Greater connectivity also means that more Kenyans are telling their story of how they start they organisations. She shares the example of M-Farm, a mobile application that was developed out of the iHub in Nairobi, who are sharing their story of helping farmers in rural areas through innovative technology. "I think the entrepreneurial drive has always been there, what we needed was connection to allow us to tell out story as well as also more investment. While we have foreign direct investment, we still need to do more to encourage local investment in the tech industry,” she says. She goes on to explain the link between greater connectivity and economic growth and huge potential that can still be realised in Africa: “There is a link between increasing connectivity and GDP. If you increase broadband by 10% it corresponds to 1,163% increase in GDP. Investment in connectivity is worthwhile. We've only got 15.6% penetration of the internet in Africa – there is so much more to do.” Beyond just investing in connectivity, she also believes that one should invest in people and creative networks to ensure “a new ecosystem; a new way of connecting African countries to each other and a new way of being in Africa."

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          • Beth Coleman and Juliana Rotich

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            from The Politics of Digital Culture / Added

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            Designing Agency

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            • OPEN - Juliana Rotich

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              from videosfing / Added

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              • Juliana Rotich about Ushahidi's Crisis Mapping

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                from 99FACES / Added

                329 Plays / / 0 Comments

                More info see: http://99faces.tv/julianarotich/ Japan's earthquake and the revolutions in Libya, Egypt and elsewhere make the Open Source Mapping Platform more useful than ever. 99Faces.tv met Juliana at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos in January 2011 not knowing how soon Ushahidis software will help millions of people again. Juliana is TED Senior Fellow and Executive Director at Ushahidi, a platform for crowdsourcing crisis information. The non-profit tech company specializes in developing free & open source software for information collection, visualization & interactive mapping to democratizing information, increasing transparency & lowering the barriers for individuals to share their stories (Crowdmap, SwiftRiver). For more information see post / hyperlinks on http://99faces.tv 99FACES is a website and video-platform introducing movers, thinkers, innovators, visionaries and changemakers in both elevator pitch format and short interviews.

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                • Short intro to Crisis Mapping

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                  from 99FACES / Added

                  142 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  More info see: http://99faces.tv/julianarotich/ and http://vimeo.com/21405757 Japan's earthquake and the revolutions in Libya, Egypt and elsewhere make the Open Source Mapping Platform more useful than ever. 99Faces.tv met Juliana at the World Economic Forum WEF) in Davos in January 2011 not knowing how soon Ushahidis software will help millions of people in Asia and Afrika. Juliana Rotich is TED Senior Fellow and Executive Director at Ushahidi, a platform for crowdsourcing crisis information. The non-profit tech company specializes in developing free & open source software for information collection, visualization & interactive mapping to democratizing information, increasing transparency & lowering the barriers for individuals to share their stories (Crowdmap, SwiftRiver). For more information see post / hyperlinks on http://99faces.tv 99FACES is a website and video-platform introducing movers, thinkers, innovators, visionaries and changemakers in both elevator pitch format and short interviews.

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                  • Wired for Change: Technology for Social Good

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                    from Ford Foundation / Added

                    287 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                    • Keynote Juliana Rotich | State of Social Media Summit

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                      from Kennisland / Added

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                      Juliana Rotich is originally from Kenya where she spent her early life and schooling. She later moved to the US where she majored in IT and has worked in the industry for over ten years. She collaborated with the online community and co-founded Ushahidi which is the Swahili word for testimony. Ushahidi is a web based reporting system that utilizes crowdsourced data to formulate visual map information of a crisis on a real-time basis. As a Program Director for Ushahidi she manages projects and aids in the development and testing of the Ushahidi platform.

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