1. Deer at LBNL

    00:48

    from Julius Seizure / Added

    21 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Deer outside my office at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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    • Hiking on the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab trail

      01:20

      from Julius Seizure / Added

      16 Plays / / 0 Comments

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      • LBNL CAG Meeting March 17, 2011 - Part 2 of 2

        28:01

        from MIG, Inc. / Added

        3 Plays / / 0 Comments

        MIG Facilitated Meeting - Part 2 of 2

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        • LBNL CAG Meeting March 17, 2011 - Part 1 Repeat

          01:00:36

          from MIG, Inc. / Added

          1 Play / / 0 Comments

          MIG Facilitated Meeting - Part 1 of 2 (according to KB this is a repeat of Part 1)

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          • Vote Solar Webinar: Tracking the Sun

            55:55

            from Vote Solar / Added

            91 Plays / / 0 Comments

            An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the US from 1998 to 2010 with Galen Barbose of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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            • DSSS: Is Brevity the Soul of Soil Models?

              01:08:17

              from LBNL Earth Sciences Division / Added

              34 Plays / / 0 Comments

              ESD welcomes Eric A. Davidson, Ph.D. (Woods Hole Research Center, MA). Soils carbon stocks are 2-4 times greater than atmospheric CO2-C and 3-6 times larger than aboveground plant biomass-C. Potential exists for C sequestration in soils, but there is also a large potential positive feedback to climate change as permafrost thaws and enzymatic decomposition of soil organic matter increases with warming. Enzymatic reaction rates are temperature sensitive when substrate is not limiting. However, substrate supply often, perhaps usually, limits enzymatic reaction rates in soils. Soil microbial community composition varies temporally and spatially, and the reactive properties of extracellular enzymes also can probably be changed by microorganisms in response to environmental cues. The C, N, and P assimilation enabled by extracellular enzyme activity affects the growth of microbial populations, their metabolism, and their enzyme synthesis. Do models need to represent all of these processes in 3-D space and in time? Ideally, the answer would be “yes,” but only if there is a viable approach to testing and validating model structures and parameterizations representing each process. When that is not possible, some aggregation is needed. A modular design enables progress on model components without losing sight of the way that components fit together. Admittedly, the Dual Arrhenius and Michaelis–Menten (DAMM) model does not yet attain all of these lofty goals, but it offers promise to build upon an integrated, modular approach to represent as parsimoniously as possible numerous key interacting processes in a heterogeneous matrix, and to keep making improvements until we get the DAMM thing right.

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              • DSSS Enick video

                01:23:45

                from LBNL Earth Sciences Division / Added

                14 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Bob Enick, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh). Microorganisms have existed on this planet for more than 3.6 billion years and represent the major drivers for the global biogeochemical cycles. There are about 1030 bacteria in the world, but just 1021 stars in the universe. It is clear that the microbial diversity of the world is a scientific frontier that is not only unexplored, but also of far greater than astronomical dimensions. The microbial ecology of The Arctic is intrinsically fascinating: the low temperatures, extreme seasonality are striking and yet this is a biologically active environment in which nutrients are turned over and pollutants are degraded. The study of the Arctic has gained new urgency as the most rapidly warming region on the planet. The microbial world will mediate much of the anticipated change. There is a ticking “bomb” buried in the Arctic tundra. Enormous quantities of naturally occurring greenhouse gasses are trapped in ice-like structures (clathrates) in the tundra and at the bottom of the seas. The microbial community is central to one of the most disturbing aspects of this warming: the fate of the 400 gigatons of methane locked in the frozen arctic tundra. The microbial community constitutes a lock, currently in a closed position, on these reserves of carbon and the fate of this reservoir. It is correspondingly desirable to understand the nature of this lock, which in turn implies a predictive understanding of the microbial ecology of Arctic soils in our present environment and in a putative and uncertain warmer future.

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                • The vanishing North. How will climate change influence on the microbial genetic resources in Arctic?

                  58:02

                  from LBNL Earth Sciences Division / Added

                  55 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Microorganisms have existed on this planet for more than 3.6 billion years and represent the major drivers for the global biogeochemical cycles. There are about 1030 bacteria in the world, but just 1021 stars in the universe. It is clear that the microbial diversity of the world is a scientific frontier that is not only unexplored, but also of far greater than astronomical dimensions. The microbial ecology of The Arctic is intrinsically fascinating: the low temperatures, extreme seasonality are striking and yet this is a biologically active environment in which nutrients are turned over and pollutants are degraded. The study of the Arctic has gained new urgency as the most rapidly warming region on the planet. The microbial world will mediate much of the anticipated change. There is a ticking “bomb” buried in the Arctic tundra. Enormous quantities of naturally occurring greenhouse gasses are trapped in ice-like structures (clathrates) in the tundra and at the bottom of the seas. The microbial community is central to one of the most disturbing aspects of this warming: the fate of the 400 gigatons of methane locked in the frozen arctic tundra. The microbial community constitutes a lock, currently in a closed position, on these reserves of carbon and the fate of this reservoir. It is correspondingly desirable to understand the nature of this lock, which in turn implies a predictive understanding of the microbial ecology of Arctic soils in our present environment and in a putative and uncertain warmer future.

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                  • Mary Maxon, Synthetic Biology Efforts at U.S. National Labs

                    07:08

                    from ACS Science & the Congress / Added

                    55 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    November 5, 2013: Mary Maxon of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) speaks to federal efforts to build the "bioeconomy", harnessing innovation for economic growth and job creation. She also overviews synthetic biology research efforts at LBNL including software for bioinformatics and engineering plants for biofuel production. Part of "Tooling the U.S. Bioeconomy: Synthetic Biology" briefing held by ACS Science & the Congress Project on Capitol Hill. #acsscicon

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                    • Panel Discussion at Watershed Film Screening

                      53:33

                      from LBNL Earth Sciences Division / Added

                      54 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Panel discussion of at the film screen of Robert Redford's documentary "Watershed: Exploring a New Water Ethic for the New West."

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