1. Ajahn Brahm: Jhana Meditation in Theravada Episode 2 VOD

    01:31:56

    from E-Vam Institute / Added

    The Gopakamoggallana Sutra states that the only type of meditation that the Buddha recommended was the Four Jhanas. In the Theravada Dhammapada, the Buddha also taught that “There is no Jhana without wisdom, there is no wisdom without Jhana; but for one who has both Jhana and wisdom, they are in the presence of Awakening (Nirvana)”. This course will explain, in simple to understand terms, what these meditative states of Jhana are, how they are developed, and why they are indispensible to Awakening. Ajahn Brahm was born in London in 1951. He was educated at Cambridge University reading theoretical physics, and was ordained as a monk in Thailand in 1974. For 9 years, he studied under the renowned meditation master, Ajahn Chah, before coming to Perth in 1983. For the past 20 years, he has been abbot of Bodhinyana Monastery in WA, which currently has 24 monks. He teaches Buddhism and meditation at the monastery and to international audiences of many thousands on TV, radio and YouTube. He is also the Spiritual Advisor of the Buddhist Society of Victoria, located in East Malvern, Victoria.

    + More details
    • Ajahn Brahm: Jhana Meditation in Theravada Episode 1 VOD

      01:27:17

      from E-Vam Institute / Added

      The Gopakamoggallana Sutra states that the only type of meditation that the Buddha recommended was the Four Jhanas. In the Theravada Dhammapada, the Buddha also taught that “There is no Jhana without wisdom, there is no wisdom without Jhana; but for one who has both Jhana and wisdom, they are in the presence of Awakening (Nirvana)”. This course will explain, in simple to understand terms, what these meditative states of Jhana are, how they are developed, and why they are indispensible to Awakening. Ajahn Brahm was born in London in 1951. He was educated at Cambridge University reading theoretical physics, and was ordained as a monk in Thailand in 1974. For 9 years, he studied under the renowned meditation master, Ajahn Chah, before coming to Perth in 1983. For the past 20 years, he has been abbot of Bodhinyana Monastery in WA, which currently has 24 monks. He teaches Buddhism and meditation at the monastery and to international audiences of many thousands on TV, radio and YouTube. He is also the Spiritual Advisor of the Buddhist Society of Victoria, located in East Malvern, Victoria.

      + More details
      • Theravada Buddhism

        13:55

        from Aidan O'Neill / Added

        9 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Cathedral APHUG Religion Project Aidan O'Neill Mr. Thomas

        + More details
        • Theravada Buddhism

          13:55

          from Aidan O'Neill / Added

          8 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Cathedral APHUG Religion Project Aidan O'Neill Mr. Thomas

          + More details
          • Palestra Ajahn Sucitto

            01:29:33

            from upaya / Added

            134 Plays / / 0 Comments

            This video is about Palestra Ajahn Sucitto

            + More details
            • Way of the Clouds

              00:42

              from Nyanasara Thero / Added

              9 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Think of a cloud. The cloud comes into existence when conditions are right for it. On one side, water vapor is rising from the land or sea because of heating from the sun. As it rises, it cools, condensing into tiny droplets of cloud. On the other side, the wind streams away parts of the cloud into drier air, causing them to sublimate back into invisible vapor. A cloud is not a solid thing, but a process of simultaneous creation and destruction. We are also like that. When conditions are right, a human being comes into existence. When those conditions change, we evaporate like the cloud. So we and everything else are coming into being and going out of being, coming into existence and going out of existence simultaneously at all times. There is nothing static, nothing solid; everything is dynamic, ever-changing, impermanent.

              + More details
              • Kathina Celebration at Isipathana Forest Monastery Sri Lanka

                09:31

                from Nyanasara Thero / Added

                120 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Kathinā Report When Buddhism was first established in ancient India, there were few monks and nuns. The monks did not stay in temples but moved from one place to another. It was their mission to spread the teaching of the Buddha for the happiness and welfare of all living beings. In those days there were no paved roads, so the Buddha allowed his disciples to stop wandering and take up temporary abodes during the rainy season. This season is called Vassā in Pali, meaning "Rains Retreat". It begins in early July and continues through late October. This is a time of deep meditation and austerity, ending in a celebration where the congregation gifts new robes to the monks. Nowadays, lay followers prepare robes for the monks, who benefit them by accepting offerings of robes and other necessities. The Kathina ceremony takes place during the month immediately following the full moon day of October. Today a number of customs and practices of a collective life, including the recitation of rules and the distribution of robes, became incorporated into the annual cycle of monastic life. This historic ceremony, continuing through the ages, has evolved from culture to culture. Today in Sri Lanka, the Kathina ceremony provides one of the most popular occasions for merit-making. Buddhist people celebrate the robe-offering ceremony with profound respect and devotion to the monks, who have just spent three months in the monastery observing the Vassā. In rural Sri Lanka, everybody in a village participates in the Kathina ceremony at nearby temples as a community activity lasting from one to three days. Among the Buddhist of Southeast Asia, there is a very grand festival at the end of the observance of the Rains Retreat. People offer food to the monks in monasteries and prepare the special robes that are offered to the Sangha. This special offering is called the Kathina Offering Ceremony. It is done only during the period of time starting from the end of Rains Retreat to the first day of the waning moon of the 12th Lunar Month. Yesterday we celebrated Kathinā at our forest monastery in Sri Lanka. It was very beautiful, and a profound experience for me personally. Most importantly, I finally got to meet some of my superiors in the Order, and found the senior monks to be truly venerable and admirable beings. I have been deeply involved in religious and spiritual organizations since childhood. I was raised in a Christian household, but left that because of its hypocrisy. That started a search for truth that has taken me all over the world, researching the roots of all the major faiths in their countries of origin. Sadly, spiritual life and community are in sorry shape on our planet at this time. Error, deviation and corruption are much easier to find than authentic versions of any tradition. For many years I followed the Vedic spiritual path, and while my personal spiritual master was an admirable personality, his organization was rife with phony renunciants into power politics and the worst kinds of hypocrisy. I could never feel at home in that organization; and even when I left and started my own, it never felt right. I first encountered supposedly Buddhist teachings in America in the late 1960s. As a young man in search of truth, I naturally visited important places like Esalen, Tassajara Zen center and others. But something about the American ‘Buddhist’ teachings put me off. I wound up becoming a yogi, studying the Vedas in India and eventually becoming a guru myself. That feeling has only increased with time. Now that I actually know something about the Buddha’s teaching, whenever I hear what is being taught as ‘Buddhism’ in the West, I have to cringe. It is unrecognizable as Buddha’s teaching, mixed up with all kinds of mundane knowledge, or so twisted in its social manifestation that it resembles a business or a fundamentalist church more than the Sangha as the Buddha conceived it. One of my most severe doubts about accepting ordination as a Buddhist monk was that I would find the same nonsense here as well. I was fully prepared to spend the rest of my life as a recluse, rather than join another organization where the so-called ‘leaders’ are really wicked men posing as monks. My first experience of Buddhist society was in Thailand, where I went to study meditation. However, I found the best teacher in the books of Buddhadasa Bhikkhu, who unfortunately departed this world some time ago. The same corruption I experienced in India was quite prevalent in Thailand—jet-set monks showing up at the temple in chauffeured Mercedes, wearing Rolex watches and surrounded by pretty young boys. I’m sure there are some monasteries like that in Sri Lanka, but fortunately they are in the minority. The Buddha predicted that the Dhamma would be preserved in Sri Lanka better than anywhere else. My experience confirms the truth of this.

                + More details
                • Anne C. Klein - Mindful Embodiment and the Senses: Touch, Vision, and Song (ASI 2013)

                  33:03

                  from McGill Transcultural Psychiatry / Added

                  106 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Mindful Embodiment and the Senses: Touch, Vision, and Song Anne Carolyn Klein, Rice University Scholastic and psychotherapeutic communities have to date mainly focused on very particular versions of Theravada and early Mahayana Buddhist mindfulness practice. Much good has come from this. Yet, looking at this work through the lens of Buddhist culture and the wider set of practices, intentions, and body-knowledge in which they are embedded, we are challenged to see if we can take this cross-cultural conversation a step further. To that end, I will propose a template for including in our inquiry such elements of spiritual practice as the integration of mindful attention with sound, imaging and, especially, the traditional theories of embodiment which give them meaning. I want to explore whether emic categories that do not, at first glance, map easily onto Western ones—prāna and the elements of the body, for example—can be meaningfully aligned with, and possibly refresh, our understanding of self, being, and embodiment, and the therapeutic avenues available to us.

                  + More details
                  • Philippe Cornu - Le bricolage spirituel, soyez zen ou le bouddhisme instrumentalisé

                    01:11:53

                    from Pierre Vangilbergen / Added

                    1,956 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Le bouddhisme est très souvent perçu comme une thérapie spirituelle ou un prêt-à-vivre pour un monde « zen ». C’est la plus visible de toute une série de simplifications ou de méprises dont il est victime. Ainsi, le bouddhisme ne serait pas une religion mais une philosophie, la méditation se réduirait à la pleine conscience, la compassion ne serait qu'une velléité du cœur... L'enjeu réel est le suivant: en réduisant le bouddhisme à un outil de développement personnel, le risque est grand d'en perdre le sens profond. Sait-on encore en Occident ce qu’implique l’engagement dans une vraie quête spirituelle ? Bref, comment transmettre au monde contemporain la sagesse libératrice du Bouddha sans la diluer, la déformer ou la figer ? Conférence organisée par Deltae, à Bruxelles, le 18 septembre 2013

                    + More details
                    • About Mark W. Gura - What Is It All For?

                      01:43

                      from Mark W. Gura / Added

                      About Mark W. Gura, author and host of the Blind Faith Virus Vaccine TV Show For more info go to: http://www.WhatIsItAllFor.com © Copyright Mark W. Gura All Rights Reserved. NASA images RT.com images Special thanks to: InnerAction Press, LLC Abrupt Media, LLC Makeup artist Paula Molinari

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."