1. Uncle Herb's Friends

    13:13

    from St. Paul Peterson / Added

    10 Plays / / 0 Comments

    This was the video they showed at Uncel Herb Loken's funeral in February, 2014

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    • Uncle Herb talks about tWW II

      11:13

      from St. Paul Peterson / Added

      13 Plays / / 0 Comments

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      • Bob Daley: In My Own Words

        01:07:29

        from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

        Bob Daley was sixteen years old when he learned that his brother had been taken prisoner by the Japanese on the Bataan Peninsula. Too young to enlist, Bob falsified his birth certificate and joined the Marines. At seventeen, he landed with the 4th Marine Division on Saipan. Carrying a BAR, he stumbled across a T-97 Medium Japanese Tank and took its inhabitants prisoner, which was forbidden by his sergeant because of the danger; out of 25,000 Japanese on Saipan, fewer than 1,000 surrendered. Nevertheless, the Japanese tank commander Bob took as POW spoke perfect English, and many years later Bob would run into him again. Bob was eventually ordered home from Saipan after another brother was killed in action in Europe. This interview is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the nonprofit Veterans Breakfast Club. It was recorded April 11, 2013 as part of the Winchester-Thurston School Veterans Oral History Project, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. http://VeteranVoicesofPittsburgh http://VeteransBreakfastClub

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        • Joe Zablotny: In My Own Words

          27:16

          from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

          During WW II, Joe Zablotny sailed on the destroyer, USS Newcomb (DD-586)–said to be the most attacked ship in the Pacific. Once they were hit by seven Kamikaze planes–four striking the 376 foot destroyer at the same time. ”We took one hell of a beating,” Joe says of the Japanese attack on the Newcomb. They were out to get the Newcomb–payback for sinking an Imperial battleship. During the air attack, Joe’s torpedo training was useless against the Japanese. But he used his damage control training to keep the stern alfoat–a critical response that helped save the ship. Today at age 90, Joe is one of four surviving members of the Newcomb. This interview is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the nonprofit Veterans Breakfast Club. It was recorded June 3, 2013 at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. http://VeteranVoicesofPittsburgh http://VeteransBreakfastClub

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          • Felix Cistolo: In My Own Words

            57:17

            from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

            Felix Cistolo was drafted in 1942 and assigned to the 80th Infantry Division. He arrived in France on Aug. 4, 1944, and was sent immediately into combat at Falaise Gap, where the Allies killed 10,000 German troops and trapped another 50,000, although some 20,000 Germans troops managed to escape to fight another day. He was wounded by artillery shrapnel at St. Genevieve on Sept. 13, 1944, nearly losing his right leg, and spent almost three months in the hospital in England. He was released in time to rejoin his outfit for the Battle of the Bulge, where he suffered frozen feet and what he calls a “slight wound that didn’t amount to anything.” After two more months in the hospital, he returned to his unit for the end of the war. This interview is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the nonprofit Veterans Breakfast Club. It was recorded at the Heinz History Center, Pittsburgh, PA, November 23, 2012, as part of StoryCorps' National Day of Listening. http://VeteranVoicesofPittsburgh http://VeteransBreakfastClub

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            • Joe Goldbach: In My Own Words

              21:43

              from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

              Far out in front of the infantry—sometimes forward of the front line itself—are the forward artillery observation units. During WW II, Joe Goldbach served in such a unit, working his way deep into Japanese territory ahead of the advancing American forces. He carried a machine gun on his back, but his map, compass, and altimeter were his real weapons. His observations were the eyes and ears of the Army’s mighty artillery far to the rear. Relying on his word–and mathematical skill–the big guns would fire over the infantry to soften up Japanese positions. “In our unit we had a lot of Japanese American guys from California,” he says. “Their job was to make contact with the Japanese at the front and to convince them to surrender.” We didn’t try to kill a lot of Japanese soldiers, Joe admits. Not unless we had to. But we’d rather convince them to surrender for some food, water, and clothing. We carried a lot of supplies for those guys if they wanted to give themselves up instead of fighting, he says. It’s wasn’t like the movies. This interview is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the nonprofit Veterans Breakfast Club. It was recorded November 22, 2013 by the 354th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, US Army Reserves (Coraopolis, PA) at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. http://VeteranVoicesofPittsburgh http://VeteransBreakfastClub

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              • John Kuzio: In My Own Words

                11:59

                from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

                After his first month in the Army, John Kuzio shipped out to the South Pacific islands for the next three years. That’s a long time overseas. “You gotta be kidding me,” said the Army discharge clerk looking over his service record. What can I say, he thought, I just went where they wanted me to go. But in the end, John got his due. He was immediate sent home when the military instituted the points system near the end of the war. “They wanted to promote me to Warrant Officer,” he says, “but I just wanted to get back to West Virginia. He had enough of loading bombs onto aircraft and digging foxholes to protect himself from Japanese bombs. In the life of an ordinance man, everywhere you go there are bombs. This interview is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the nonprofit Veterans Breakfast Club. It was recorded November 22, 2013 by the 354th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, US Army Reserves (Coraopolis, PA) at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. http://VeteranVoicesofPittsburgh http://VeteransBreakfastClub

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                • engine

                  00:02

                  from Alex Cassels / Added

                  201 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  3 second test based on a WW II bomber I have been modelling

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                  • Wendell Freeland: In My Own Words

                    01:51:49

                    from Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh / Added

                    Wendell Freeland was a member of the famed group of African American WWII flyers we now call the Tuskegee Airmen. He joined the Army Air Corps in 1943 as a student at Howard University. A bright and ambitious student who grew up in a poor, segregated neighborhood in Baltimore, Wendell entered military service not so much to fight for his country but to advance himself and stop the fascist takeover of Europe. Contemplative and intellectual, Wendell didn’t take to Army life, especially the racism that pervaded it. Wendell was a lieutenant, a bombardier on a B-25 with the 477th Bomb Group. But, despite his rank, he remained a second-class citizen in Army. “I never spoke with a white officer. They never spoke to us, unless to bark an order.” He was arrested twice for defying the Army’s strict segregation policies. The second arrest occurred at Freeman Field, Indiana, when Wendell and other black officers entered the all-white officers’ club and waited to be served. When Wendell refused to sign, read, or even acknowledge the regulation strictly separating white and black officers, he was charged with mutiny, a crime punishable by execution. Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall eventually ordered the charges to be dropped for most of the men, including Wendell. The Freeman Field Mutiny was an early blow against official segregation in the armed forces, an important step in the Civil Rights Movement. This interview was recorded March 5, 2012 at the Wendell Freeland law office, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is a production of the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh Oral History Initiative, in partnership with the Veterans Breakfast Club. http://veteranvoicesofpittsburgh.com http://veteransbreakfastclub.com/

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                    • Radio Control P51 Mustang Review

                      03:06

                      from Fredy Perojo / Added

                      39 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Model Airplane News editor Gerry Yarrish test flies the new P-51 Mustang rc plane.

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