1. Ambiguous Mirrors

    15:07

    from Rachael Guy / Added

    89 Plays / / 0 Comments

    An unusual body. The silences in a family. Ducks gliding past rubbish. Inheritance. Questions packed into a suitcase. A poet and a puppet in search of a father.... Ambiguous Mirrors (first developed 2009) is a fusion of puppetry, poetry and music. The work reflects on the death of the poet's father and explores questions of loss, and a family's culture of silence. In its brief duration, it speaks eloquently of the desire for intimacy with a parent who can never be known. The work is a collaboration between Melbourne Poet Andy Jackson and performer/theatre maker Rachael Wenona Guy. Filmed on location at Clifden Festival, Galway, Ireland 2013 by Bernhard Sanders. Music from the album Systems/Layers by Rachel's. To read Andy's poem follow this link: https://amongtheregulars.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/ambiguous-mirrors-poem.pdf

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    • scarborough south bay: day to night time-lapse

      00:15

      from Andy Jackson / Added

      People say the holy grail of time-lapse photography is the day-to-night sequence. I’ve been working hard to master this technique lately. Scarborough’s South Bay, a short walk from my home, is a beautiful place to hone my skills. This sequence was filmed on Sunday 3rd November, between 3:30pm and 5:30pm. It captures the tail end of half term’s bustle; the final rush of tourists for 2014. I’ve learned that the real essentials of time-lapse photography are: thermal underwear, a warm coat, hat and gloves, a camping chair, a flask of tea, a head lamp, leave the dog at home, and be willing to answer questions from passersby. I hope you enjoy watching from a warm and cosy spot.

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      • the last seahorse in studland?

        01:49

        from Andy Jackson / Added

        We went to Dorset to film seahorses in August. We were planning to tell their life cycle story: seahorse breeding time, courtship displays, and how male seahorses are the ones to give birth. Unfortunately, after many hours of searching, with the help of local experts, we found just one lonely seahorse: the only seahorse sighted in Studland this year. You may have seen this in the news a few weeks ago. We also found unrestricted anchoring and destructive mooring systems that tear up the eelgrass beds in the bay. So we made this film instead, because we believe there is a way to save the seahorses while still having fun on boats. It will take a bit of will - and a bit of money. Please share our film and help to give Studland's seahorses a voice and a chance. Sign up to support Studland being designated a Marine Conservation Zone here: http://bit.ly/1ol58ZC ______________________ Images by Andy, words by Jackie

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        • loch carron - flame shell reef

          04:17

          from Andy Jackson / Added

          1st Draft of 5 min short

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          • loch fyne - flame shell reef

            02:00

            from Andy Jackson / Added

            Sand and gravel seabed is a difficult place to live, with no shelter, and nowhere to hide. Just a few specialists have adapted to life in this desert. But one shellfish hasn’t just adapted to life in this barren place, it has decided to build a nest big enough for him and ALL his neighbours. Meet the Flame Shell, a 30mm bivalve with big ideas. It spins sticky fibres together, bonds small stones and shells, and makes a labyrinth of chambers with walls and a roof. A diver swimming past could easily assume this was a common rocky reef, with all the life you would normally expect to find. But these are castles built on sand. They are fragile, and have been put under pressure by scallop dredgers, bottom trawlers, fish farms, and pollution. They’re mostly found in Scottish Lochs, in fast-flowing channels where trawling doesn’t take place. In 2012, a team from Heriot Watt University discovered a flame shell reef in Loch Alsh with an estimated 100 million flame shells, where a reef has been built across 75 hectares of seabed. That’s kind of like shellfish building their own underwater Dubai. So these are no ordinary shellfish. And nor do they look ordinary - imagine a small scallop with a See-You-Jimmy hat on. Bright orange fringes lick from their shells like flames, the shade varying across the population. They jet along in flamboyant bursts, opening and closing their shells. It’s easy to imagine them singing a song from the Muppet show, or calling instructions to their co-workers as they build the next part of their impossible palace in the marine desert. Flame-shells are our new favourite shellfish. And no, we don’t eat them.

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            • Come play harmonica with us

              04:22

              from antonhecht / Added

              21 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Local people in Gateshead were invited to learn to play a harmonica in order to help make a film short. It has been created as a metaphor for health, happiness and wellbeing in Gateshead town centre as part of the Happy Healthy Gateshead Project. The project aimed to promote the NHS’s 5 Steps to Wellbeing and encourage people in and around the town centre to practice new ways to support their health and happiness as research suggests that building 5 ways to wellness into your daily life can add 7½ years to your life! Gateshead Council’s Arts Development Team worked with award winning local film maker Anton Hecht to create the innovative film. Members of the public were asked to play a few notes each, they were then filmed sequentially and edited to produce a version of Rossini’s well known tune – The William Tell Overture. Local sports groups were choreographed running or undertaking some form of activity whilst playing their harmonica and everyone kept their harmonica as a gift. Breathing is integral to life and is vital for both many artists (breath control is intrinsic to dance, music, actors use vocal projection etc.) and athletes in order to achieve their ultimate performance. Harmonicas depend on the control of breath and are easy to play so people can be taught relatively quickly. The arts development approach is a subtle and elegant way of drawing people from diverse backgrounds, ages and experience into the engagement of a process which in turn can relay an important and lasting message. This developmental approach depends on building levels of trust with participants, enabling those involved to try new things and achieve more than they imagined possible at the outset, whilst leaving a positive and memorable imprint on the consciousness of the individual; ergo, they are more likely to continue or expand their experience and to advocate it to others. The project will also signpost people to the local community website www.ourgateshead.org, which re-launched this May with a new online directory of health and wellbeing services in Gateshead. Film participants included students from Gateshead Academy of Sport, Gateshead Indoor Bowls Team, Anytime Fitness Gym staff and members, Gateshead Academy of Music and Gateshead College Music students, Gateshead Angels Netball Team and Gateshead Stadium staff, Low Fell Running Club, Caedmon Primary School and members of the public in the town centre. Everyone involved had never played a harmonica before. Concept / Direction Anton Hecht, musical arrangement and direction Andy Jackson, camerawork Meerkat Films with Jason Berg and sound by Rob Meek. The musicians are Tim Dalling and Nigel Kirkpatrick. Take the 5 Steps to Wellbeing and Happiness: Connect. Connect with the people around you: your family, friends, colleagues and neighbours. Be active. Take a walk, go cycling or dance. Find the activity that you enjoy, and make it a part of your life. Keep learning. Learning new skills can give you a sense of achievement and a new confidence. Start learning to play a musical instrument or figure out how to fix your bike? Give to others. Even the smallest act can count, whether it's a smile, a thank you or a kind word. Take notice. Be mindful of your feelings and thoughts, your body and the people and wider world around you.

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              • loch sween - life on a maerl bed

                01:56

                from Andy Jackson / Added

                Diving into Loch Sween, the writhing arms of brittlestars welcome you with a bluish haze of movement. Occasional slender peacock worms pop closed when they sense you pass. Moon jellyfish feed and pulsate, their pink edges gleaming in the sunlight. A circus of life on the seabed bustles together: crabs, gobies, sea cucumbers, spiny starfish, flat worms, so much tiny, fascinating life. This incredible colony exists because of Maerl. Maerl is a collective term for several species of very slow-growing red seaweed that form hard, chalky skeletons. It is coral-like and grows into large reefs. Maerl thrives in clean, fast-flowing water, sheltered from pounding seas, and is found in estuaries and Scottish Lochs. Hedgehog maerl dominates the dive site at Caol Scotnish, Loch Sween. It forms loose fist-shaped balls on the seabed with protruding branches, at times thickly covering the seabed. Further down the Loch, at Taynish Narrows, another species that resembles Twiglets dominates the seabed. This looks similar to the hedgehog maerl but without the fist-shaped base. Both of these species have formed thick, loose beds with dead maerl beneath, turned white after it dies. Maerl beds are fragile and are easily damaged and have declined in most areas. Pressures on Maerl include scallop dredging, bottom trawling, fish farming, and pollution. Maerl used to be dredged off Falmouth and used for fertilizer but this was stopped in 2005. It is now recognized that Maerl forms an important ecosystem that was previously overlooked. The nooks and cranies in these beds make them an ideal nursery. The vibrancy of life they support make them a magical dive. _______________________ Images by Andy, words by Jackie

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                • Andy Jackson: Premium jelly shot

                  00:09

                  from María Soledad Hidalgo Vergara / Added

                  Breve animación que muestra el sabor celestial de las jelly shot de Andy Jackson. Técnica: Rotoscopía. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Short animation that shows the heavenly taste of Andy Jackson's jelly shots. Technique: Rotoscoping. 2013.

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                  • bwpa - wildlife in hd video entry 2014

                    01:30

                    from Andy Jackson / Added

                    arctic charr: relics of the ice age - 90 sec version

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                    • life on a flame shell reef

                      06:15

                      from Andy Jackson / Added

                      Without flame shells this seabed would be flat, coarse sand. Flame shells build fibrous mounds and live in chambers within them. Groups of flame shell mounds cluster into reefs around 10 centimetres high and spread over large areas. The reef provides a home for lots of other marine life: brittle stars, dead men's fingers, hermit crabs, queen scallops, a sea mouse, sunstar, whelks, and a catshark, among other smaller creatures, are shown in this clip. This reef in Loch Fyne was recorded as 70% dense, that is the percentage of nests to open seabed. It's a fragile habitat; one beam trawler fishing for scallops would destroy it.

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