1. Societies of American Poetry: Dissenting Practices | 2003 Lannan Symposium | Field Work

    01:27:35

    from Lannan Center / Added

    6 Plays / / 0 Comments

    February 21, 2003 | Field Work Symposium I (311 New North) Peter Gizzi, Mark Wallace, Cole Swenson, Mark Nowak, Lisa Jarnot, Tom Orange. Introduced by Lannan Center Director Mark McMorris. Field Work The archive: written, read, preserved, circulated, lost, retrieved, suppressed. Field work initiates a dialogue between practice and its contexts. How might one understand editorial, publishing, archival, or documentary work in relation to "art's social presence?" (Adrienne Rich) What does this sort of work imagine for contemporary or future writing?

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    • Dissent! Akram Zaatari

      01:06:13

      from Courtisane Festival / Added

      63 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Wiels, Brussels, 16 FEB 2014 http://www.courtisane.be/nl/event/akram-zaatari

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      • Reassessing the Right to Laughter: Humour, Dissent and the Liberal Imagination

        01:05:13

        from Society for Philosophy & Culture / Added

        105 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Society for Philosophy and Culture seminar, held at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, in August 2010, as part of our series "Human Beings & Freedom: An Interdisciplinary Perspective". Nicholas Holm speaks on "Reassessing the Right to Laughter: Humour, Dissent and the Liberal Imagination" with responses by Dolores Janiewski and Mike Lloyd. Historically, humour has been conceived of as a site of liberation and freedom – a free play of affect wherein the self can critically appraise the political conditions of its existence. Moreover, contemporary laudatory accounts of humour – specifically those associated with the incongruity tradition – have sought to tie humour to a liberatory political project that challenges authoritarian or oppressive governmental technologies in its very nature: in Revel with a Cause, Steven Kircher even goes so far as to argue that humour served as an essential form of dissent in postwar America. In this talk, Holm maps the ways in which humour has been tied to the expectations of liberal democratic society, from Jon Stewart to the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy, as a gauge of social tolerance and self-critique and how the reasonable subject of liberal society has thus become configured as a humourous subject. Holm argues that the centrality of humour to the dominant liberal capitalist political configuration suggests that humour has come to play an increasingly central role in the political, as well as aesthetic, terrain of the current moment, but that the liberal understanding of humour fundamentally misconstrues the way in which it functions as a political force, underestimating its aggressive and even repressive force. Contrary to this dominant understanding, Holm suggests that humour acts to discipline as well as liberate, and any rigorous examination of the political role of humour must take this into account. Given the importance of humour to the constitution of the ‘reasonable’ and sophisticated subject of the contemporary Western metropolis, Holm then suggests that a better understanding of the cultural mechanics of humour is a vital part of any rigorous critical theory of the political potential of contemporary culture. www.philosophyandculture.org Twitter: SocietyTwit Facebook Group: Society for Philosophy & Culture

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        • The Untamed Language of Dissent: Political Activism and the Dialogue between States

          58:44

          from IPCS / Added

          66 Plays / / 0 Comments

          This is a public lecture delivered by Ashis Nandy on 10th September 2010 for the Institute of Postcolonial Studies. Ashis Nandy is Distinguished Fellow of the Institute.

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          • ActUp NI - Videoconference with Kumi Naidoo

            55:16

            from NICVA / Added

            37 Plays / / 0 Comments

            24 April 2012 - NICVA launch of ActUpNI, an initiative to allow the people of Northern Ireland to lobby the politicians in their constituency about current, non-political campaigns which they feel strongly about. www.actupni.org Kumi Naidoo - Executive Director of Greenpeace International Hosted by Paul Clark (The quality of this recording is reflected by the fact that this was a live videoconference between NICVA and GreenPeace International, Amsterdam)

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            • Dissent - June 23, 1989 - The Old Avalon Theater, Minneapolis, MN

              54:27

              from Rapid City Punk Rock Archive / Added

              75 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Taken From BasementShows.com

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              • It Is No Dream

                52:59

                from Benny Brunner / Added

                1,995 Plays / / 2 Comments

                "If you will it, it is no dream," wrote the founder of political Zionism Theodor Herzl in 1902, prophesizing the creation of a utopian Jewish state. One hundred years later, some of the harshest critics of Israel's occupation policies are Israelis themselves – a small minority of intellectuals, political activists and artists whose voices are rarely heard outside Israel. Shortly after the outbreak of the second Intifada in 2001, filmmakers Benny Brunner and Joseph Rochlitz travelled through the country and spoke to a number of them: Meir Shalev – one of Israel's best-known writers. Gideon Levy – columnist for Haaretz newspaper. Jessica Montell – Director of B'Tselem (Israeli Human Rights Center). Yehudit Katzir – writer. Yizhar Be'er – Director of the Israeli Center for the Protection of Democracy. Adi Ophir – Professor of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University. Noa Levy – leader of the High School students "refusal-to-serve" movement." Yitzhak La'or – writer and poet. The filmmakers also attended a major peace rally in Tel Aviv, and recorded the fiery words of Yishai Rosen-Tzvi, one of the first to sign the Letter of Refusal to serve in the Occupied Territories: "Fighting against terrorism? What a joke! Government and army policies create a hothouse for terrorism (...) It is forbidden to treat men, women and children like dirt. The more people understand it, the sooner there will be an end to this cursed occupation." The film is enhanced by the powerful work of artist David Reeb, who frequently uses images of the occupation in his drawings and paintings. Documentary - 53 minutes Produced & Directed by Benny Brunner and Joseph Rochlitz Original languages: English & Hebrew with English subtitles © 2002 B.Brunner & J. Rochlitz All Rights Reserved TV Broadcasts Netherlands 1 – March 2002 (shortened version, entitled “Don’t Say You Didn’t Know”) YLE Finland – May 2002 SVT Sweden – May 2002 TVC Spain – June 2002 SBS Australia –October 2002 The Arabic Hour, Rhode Island Cable – May 2003 (“Don’t Say You Didn’t Know”) OneWorldTV – excerpts featured online (tv.oneworld.net) – 2003/4 Public screenings First Conference of European Jews for Peace (Amsterdam) - September 2002 Israel Cinemathèques (Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Haifa) – October 2002 San Francisco Jewish Film Festival – July 2003 American University of Rome International Relations Seminar – November 2003 Toronto Jewish Film Festival – May 2004 Vienna Jewish Film Week – November 2004 jfw.at My filmography: http://nl.linkedin.com/in/bennybrunner

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                • It Is No Dream (2002 - 53min.)

                  52:59

                  from Joseph Rochlitz / Added

                  2,815 Plays / / 7 Comments

                  It Is No Dream "If you will it, it is no dream," wrote the founder of political Zionism Theodor Herzl in 1902, prophesizing the creation of a utopian Jewish state. One hundred years later, some of the harshest critics of Israel's occupation policies are Israelis themselves – a small minority of intellectuals, political activists and artists whose voices are rarely heard outside Israel. Shortly after the outbreak of the second Intifada in 2001, filmmakers Benny Brunner and Joseph Rochlitz travelled through the country and spoke to a number of them: Meir Shalev – one of Israel's best-known writers Gideon Levy – columnist for Haaretz newspaper Jessica Montell – Director of B'Tselem (Israeli Human Rights Center) Yehudit Katzir – writer Yizhar Be'er – Director of the Israeli Center for the Protection of Democracy Adi Ophir – Professor of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University Noa Levy – leader of the High School students "refusal-to-serve" movement Yitzhak La'or – writer and poet The filmmakers also attended a major peace rally in Tel Aviv, and recorded the fiery words of Yishai Rosen-Tzvi, one of the first to sign the Letter of Refusal to serve in the Occupied Territories: "Fighting against terrorism? What a joke! Government and army policies create a hothouse for terrorism (...) It is forbidden to treat men, women and children like dirt. The more people understand it, the sooner there will be an end to this cursed occupation." The film is enhanced by the powerful work of artist David Reeb, who frequently uses images of the occupation in his drawings and paintings. Documentary - 53 minutes Produced & Directed by Benny Brunner and Joseph Rochlitz Original languages: English & Hebrew with English subtitles © 2002 B.Brunner & J. Rochlitz All Rights Reserved TV Broadcasts Netherlands 1 – March 2002 (shortened version, entitled “Don’t Say You Didn’t Know”) YLE Finland – May 2002 SVT Sweden – May 2002 TVC Spain – June 2002 SBS Australia –October 2002 The Arabic Hour, Rhode Island Cable – May 2003 (“Don’t Say You Didn’t Know”) OneWorldTV – excerpts featured online (http://tv.oneworld.net) – 2003/4 Public screenings First Conference of European Jews for Peace (Amsterdam) - September 2002 Israel Cinemathèques (Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Haifa) – October 2002 San Francisco Jewish Film Festival – July 2003 American University of Rome International Relations Seminar – November 2003 Toronto Jewish Film Festival – May 2004 Vienna Jewish Film Week – November 2004 www.jfw.at

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                  • Dissent - 5/13/87 - D.J.'s, Colorado Springs, CO

                    47:26

                    from Rapid City Punk Rock Archive / Added

                    70 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                    • On the Dark Side in Al Doura - A Soldier in the Shadows

                      47:18

                      from Justice Action Media (JAM) / Added

                      226K Plays / / 11 Comments

                      WARNING: Graphic and disturbing photos between 38:40 and 40:45. U.S. Army Ranger John Needham, who was awarded two purple hearts and three medals for heroism, wrote to military authorities in 2007 reporting war crimes that he witnessed being committed by his own command and fellow soldiers in Al Doura, Iraq. His charges were supported by atrocity photos which, in the public interest, are now released in this video. John paid a terrible price for his opposition to these acts. His story is tragic. CBS reported obtaining an Army document from the Criminal Investigation Command suggestive of an investigation into these war crimes allegations. The Army's conclusion was that the "offense of War Crimes did not occur." However, CBS also stated that the report was “redacted and incomplete; 111 pages were withheld.” This video is placed within the context of Vice President, Dick Cheney, insistence that this nation's efforts "must go to the dark side;" which included ignoring the Geneva Conventions. John's story is told, here, by his father, Michael Needham. It is produced in the spirit of serving the public interest and towards promoting justice and the rule of law. Written and directed by Cindy Piester, filmed, edited, and voice over by crew. work4peacenow@gmail.com

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