1. About Half of Fatal Heart Attacks Strike Outside Hospital

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    from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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    Too many people are only a heartbeat away from a major health crisis. Each year, more than 700,000 Americans will suffer a heart attack. “Half of them happen very suddenly. And in those folks, they may not have had previous experiences,” says Lee Memorial Health System cardiologist Dr. Murali Muppala. A report from the CDC found that 47% of people suffer a fatal heart attack outside of the hospital. “Half of them die before they reach the hospital and majority of them are related to “widow-maker” heart attacks,” says Dr. Muppala. The widow-maker is a massive heart attack. It happens when the left anterior descending artery is blocked. A clot there causes the heart to stop beating normally and patients go into cardiac arrest. “When it is completely shut off there is no oxygen going to the heart muscle people can have life threatening rhythm problems during that time,” says Dr. Muppala. The widow-maker may seem to strike without warning; too sudden for people to make it to a hospital. But experts say they shouldn’t be completely unexpected, considering the number of Americans who are overweight or obese face and face a high risk of heart disease. “You need to be a little bit more aware of that and also you need to make sure you don't have other associated risk factors that include hypertension, high cholesterol levels or diabetes.” Knowing where you stand can keep you in better standing when it comes to matters of the heart. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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    • Dissecting a STEMI

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      from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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      It is one of the deadliest forms of heart attack- what health professionals call a STEMI. It stands for an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. “Every heart attack is not ST elevation myocardial. STEMI implies a full thickness heart attack. And most of the time a major blood vessel is closed,” explains Dr. Subhash Kshetrapal, a cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. This type of heart attack requires immediate emergency surgery to restore blood flow. In Lee County, EMS workers are equipped to transmit an EKG reading en route to the ER, so doctors can be ready and waiting. “Once they are in the hospital and we have monitored their heart rhythm we are immediately able to treat them,” Dr. Kshetrapal says. To re-open the clogged artery, surgeons perform an angioplasty- inserting a catheter into the artery then deploying a balloon to push open the blockage. Many times a stent is put into to keep it open. Nationwide the standard is to get a STEMI patient from door to balloon within 90 minutes. “The shorter the time, the better off you are because time is muscle. Every minute counts. A minute delay means more myocardium at risk, the more heart muscle your losing because you’re not re-establishing blood flow to that area. “ A STEMI heart attack carries little warning. Symptoms may include chest pains, shortness of breath, nausea, sweating or palpitations. “A heart attack is not a common event, but as we get older it gets more common and people who have more risk factors are more prone to have myocardial infarction heart attacks,” Dr. Kshetrapal says. The bottom line is to read the warning signs and always take them seriously by calling 911 if you suspect a heart attack. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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      • Repairing hearts - now and in the near future

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        from Understanding Animal Research / Added

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        Professor Michael Schneider of Imperial College tells Alan Keys about how stem cell research is leading to treatments for heart disease. Michael describes how the availability of stem cells allows his team to determine the molecules involved in heart cell death and also how to protect those cells from death during a heart attack. Michael foresees a near future where stem cells are combined with other therapies to both repair hearts and enable hearts to self-repair. Alan Keys had his own heart repaired during an operation some years ago and currently chairs a British Heart Foundation patients committee. The British Heart Foundation part-fund the work of Michael's team at Imperial College. This interview was edited down from the original 35 minutes conversation. Read the transcript here: http://bit.ly/x7mzVC Read more about Michael here: http://bit.ly/wmGpoi and here: http://bit.ly/zrhW5v More on the science behind heart treatments: http://www.animalresearch.info/en/lis... and http://www.animalresearch.info/en/lis...

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        • Heart Attack- Time is Muscle

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          from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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          When it comes to extreme medical emergencies, time is of the essence. Think the ‘golden hour’ in getting a patient to a trauma center. The phrase ‘time is brain’ refers to stroke. In the most common form of heart attack- time is muscle. “The outcome of having a heart attack if undiagnosed or untreated is that certain parts of the heart muscle die. Now if a large part of the heart muscle dies the patient dies,” says Dr. Larry Hobbs, emergency physician with Lee Memorial Health System. The most dangerous type of heart attack involves a sudden blockage of a coronary artery. The sooner it’s identified, the faster doctors can act. “So the aim of the health care system in the whole country is in the shortest possible time to stop the heart attack by opening the artery,” says Dr. Subhash Kshetrapal, cardiologist. National guidelines call for a 90-minute door-to-balloon. From the time a patient hits the ER until an angioplasty, or balloon, is inserted to open the blockage. “After the ballooning more blood is flowing and the patient, most of the time, is feeling a whole lot better by now. As the artery opens the chest pain disappears,” says Dr. Kshetrapal. In Lee County, they are taking steps to shrink that window by working with first responders. Calling 911 instead of driving to the hospital shaves about 10 minutes. Before the patient even gets to the ER, EMS is getting a read on them, transmitting an EKG to the hospital - where doctors are waiting. “If we can save that muscle from dying we do a lot to help that patient lead a normal life,” says Dr. Hobbs. Preparing for heart attacks and treating them systematically is saving time, lives and heart muscle. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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          • Shaving Heart Attack Response Times

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            from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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            It is something that happens in real life every day, in this case it’s a training drill; one that highlights a very real health crisis is a heart attack. Too many times people don’t recognize what’s happening. “They’re going to know they’re having chest pain, they’re having shortness of breath for no reason; they can’t stop sweating for absolutely no reason. They’re nauseous, their left arm hurts, their neck or jaw hurts. They’re having any kind of these symptoms or any one of these symptoms and it just doesn’t feel right,” says Deputy Chief Warren Panem, with Lee County Fire EMS. But first responders are ready for them. And so is Gulf Coast Medical Center. Together they’re using advanced equipment to speed treatment. “Part of our new technology is to take a patient who is having chest pain and we’re going to do EKG’s on them and then we can transmit the EKG straight to the hospital,” says Panem. These situations call for a very orchestrated series of events. The American Heart Association calls it ‘90 minutes from door to balloon time’. “EMS can transfer the EKG to the emergency room prior to the patient getting here so we can get the cath lab manned and ready to go and have the cardiologist standing by. That should knock off another 8 to 9 minutes so we’re looking to get this below 60 minutes,” says Dr. Larry Hobbs, ER physician with Lee Memorial Health System. After leaving the ER, patients are prepped for treatment. Most of the time a major blood vessel is closed. “When the artery is down and the patient is hurting a lot, even more important then his pain is the on-going damage to the heart muscle, because the artery is closed. And that is why time is very important, and we call it ‘Time is Muscle’,” says Dr. Subhash Kshetrapal, cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System’s medical staff. Enter the balloon, or angioplasty. It’s threaded via catheter to open the clogged artery. The combo of technology and teamwork is shrinking time and lowering the risk of death and damage. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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            • Rewiring the Heart

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              from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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              Fine-tuning or rewiring the heart’s electrical system is improving cardiac function for millions of Americans, thanks to tiny devices planted under the skin in the upper chest. “Generally ICT implantation is utilized in people who’s heart muscle function is very poor and statistically are at a high risk for a cardiac arrest, or in people who have already exhibited an episode where their heart stopped,” says Dr. Richard Chazal, cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. The granddaddy of implantable devices is the pacemaker, which controls abnormal rhythms. “A typical pacemaker simply can keep the heart from going too slowly, but if a person had their heart stop, the pacemaker usually won’t work. A defibrillator will provide that pacing function,” says Dr. Chazal. Nowadays, medications are frequently used to act as a pacemaker and correct cardiac arrhythmias. But there is still need for implantable devices. Slightly larger than a pocket watch, is a defibrillator, which can fill two roles in one. “A defibrillator will provide that pacing function, but also in someone with a really bad heart where the heart might actually stop, that defibrillator can sense that event and immediately shock the heart internally and return normal function,” says Dr. Chazal. Re-synching the heart may be the proper tune-up for thousands of heart patients. The more complex pacemaker-defibrillator has been shown to prolong life in heart failure patients with mild symptoms. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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              • Working the Heart Muscle

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                from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

                40 Plays / / 0 Comments

                You could say 80-year-old Walter Wieland is both a survivor… “I’ve had a few hearts attacks,” says Walter Wieland, heart patient. And a graduate. He graduated from cardiac rehab, taking what he learned to heart. “I have to exercise if I want to stay alive,” says Wieland. Cardiac rehab is often the next step after a major heart event. Bridging the gap between recovery and the next phase of life. “We see people up to from two weeks to up to almost a year after their event. So it depends on how big of an event they had and how quickly their doctor refers them,” says Alexis Collins, registered nurse with Lee Memorial Health System. Collins works with heart patients, guiding them on a course to good health. “What we do here is lifestyle modification and monitor the patient while they exercise,” says Collins. “They come in for up to 35 sessions. We do cardiovascular exercise with them. And at the same time we provide education on those risk factors so cardiovascular disease isn’t a problem for them in the future,” says Collins. Statistically speaking, cardiac rehab is life changing and life saving. Ninety-five percent of people who undergo rehab have a three-year survival rate compared to a 65% rate for those who didn’t. “When you are with us for up to 12 weeks we’re reinforcing that you are becoming accountable for yourself and the idea is that you continue,” says Collins. Which brings us back to Wieland. “On Tuesdays and Thursday I swim. Monday, Wednesday and Friday I come here,” says Wieland. He is taking advantage of his new lease on life. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                • American Health Journal - Congestive Heart Failure Diagnosis and Treatment

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                  from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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                  Dr Ilic speaks about Congestive Heart Failure - it's diagnosis and treatment.

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