1. FUTURE-TABOO [ final ]

    03:08

    from Charlie Riley / Added

    6 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Taboo The term taboo comes from the Tongan word tapu or Fijian tabu, meaning prohibited, disallowed, forbidden. Its English use dates to 1777 when the British explorer James Cook visited Tonga. ‘A taboo is a vehement prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behaviour is either too sacred or too accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake, under threat of supernatural punishment. Taboos are present in virtually all societies. The meaning of the word has been somewhat expanded in the social sciences to strong prohibitions relating to any area of human activity or custom that is sacred or forbidden based on moral judgment and religious beliefs.’ —Wikipedia Breaking a taboo is usually considered objectionable by society in general. In some instances however such an act may be understood to positively alter societal conventions. We might, for example, say that the peaceful civil disobedience of the American civil rights movement of the 1960s broke some long established taboos. Consider codes of practice, ethics or honour – this could range from chivalry, to the oaths of secret societies e.g. ‘omerta’ the mafia code of silence – to break the silence was taboo. In ancient Rome Julius Caesar broke a taboo when he ‘crossed the Rubicon’. In literature the Ancient Mariner did so when he killed the albatross – Hamlet and Oedipus did likewise when they committed ‘parricide’. Brief You are asked to design a typographic work that explores the subject of ‘Taboos’. We expect you to investigate the widest interpretation of the word from historical, cultural and international perspectives. We envisage lots of opportunities to draw upon e.g. comparisons through different eras, societies, social groups, generations etc. Think of protocols – everything from primitive tribal, through medieval ‘courtly love’ & chivalry, Victorian manners/etiquette, to social networking ‘trolls’ etc. Be selective and discerning in your interpretation, for example, whilst walking under a ladder is inadvisable, and is understood to bring bad luck, it would not be considered taboo. Your research will undoubtedly uncover lots of information – everything from the profound to the ridiculous. It’s your job to consider the tenor of the communication. Is it a serious study of the theme? Does it have a very specific/singular narrative drive? Or is it eclectic, fun and informative?

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    • FUTURE TABOO finalvid

      03:08

      from Charlie Riley / Added

      6 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Taboo The term taboo comes from the Tongan word tapu or Fijian tabu, meaning prohibited, disallowed, forbidden. Its English use dates to 1777 when the British explorer James Cook visited Tonga. ‘A taboo is a vehement prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behaviour is either too sacred or too accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake, under threat of supernatural punishment. Taboos are present in virtually all societies. The meaning of the word has been somewhat expanded in the social sciences to strong prohibitions relating to any area of human activity or custom that is sacred or forbidden based on moral judgment and religious beliefs.’ —Wikipedia Breaking a taboo is usually considered objectionable by society in general. In some instances however such an act may be understood to positively alter societal conventions. We might, for example, say that the peaceful civil disobedience of the American civil rights movement of the 1960s broke some long established taboos. Consider codes of practice, ethics or honour – this could range from chivalry, to the oaths of secret societies e.g. ‘omerta’ the mafia code of silence – to break the silence was taboo. In ancient Rome Julius Caesar broke a taboo when he ‘crossed the Rubicon’. In literature the Ancient Mariner did so when he killed the albatross – Hamlet and Oedipus did likewise when they committed ‘parricide’. Brief You are asked to design a typographic work that explores the subject of ‘Taboos’. We expect you to investigate the widest interpretation of the word from historical, cultural and international perspectives. We envisage lots of opportunities to draw upon e.g. comparisons through different eras, societies, social groups, generations etc. Think of protocols – everything from primitive tribal, through medieval ‘courtly love’ & chivalry, Victorian manners/etiquette, to social networking ‘trolls’ etc. Be selective and discerning in your interpretation, for example, whilst walking under a ladder is inadvisable, and is understood to bring bad luck, it would not be considered taboo. Your research will undoubtedly uncover lots of information – everything from the profound to the ridiculous. It’s your job to consider the tenor of the communication. Is it a serious study of the theme? Does it have a very specific/singular narrative drive? Or is it eclectic, fun and informative?

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      • Design Museum Rebrand Outdoor Signage

        00:10

        from Jonny Aldrich / Added

        44 Plays / / 0 Comments

        ISTD competition brief to rebrand the Design Museum. The Design Museum is full of the work from the world’s best designers. Design can only progress if designers take risks and push design forward into unknown territories. My rebrand is a step forward for the museum with the use of a forward slash and directional lines. The use of animation and light also helps to bring the museum into the 21st century, the digital age. This is an example of how the brand has been applied to outdoor signage, hence the mockup on a window.

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        • Design Museum Rebrand Website Animation

          00:06

          from Jonny Aldrich / Added

          30 Plays / / 0 Comments

          ISTD competition brief to rebrand the Design Museum. The Design Museum is full of the work from the world's best designers. Design can only progress if designers take risks and push design forward into unknown territories. My rebrand is a step forward for the museum with the use of a forward slash and directional lines. The use of animation and light also helps to bring the museum into the 21st century, the digital age. This is an example of how the brand has been applied to screen hence a website animation.

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          • Tara Campaign

            00:31

            from celine salameh / Added

            21 Plays / / 0 Comments

            My ISTD submission for the brief "Paper Messengers". A small, minimal animation was made in order to reflect the mood and the sufferance these women are facing and a call to action. This piece aims at expressing this through using sound, visuals(using the stamps) and typography to encourage the viewer to watch, listen and read the screen in order to understand the idea behind these stamps. A Special thanks to: Jacqueline Kiwan Soghman John Kortbawi FISTD

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            • Apollo 11

              01:21

              from Jamie Powell / Added

              8 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Roots / ISTD Brief UWE Graphic Design Level 3

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              • Eric Downer

                02:22

                from Estelle Taylor / Added

                253 Plays / / 0 Comments

                University of Portsmouth Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries School of Art and Design BA(Hons) Graphic Design Eric Downer is at the New Designers Exhibition, BDC, London until Sat 5th July 5:30pm Graduate's websites - houghtos.myweb.port.ac.uk/show2014/ Course Blog - www.portsmouthgraphicdesign.co.uk Directed and filmed by Lou Appleby // CCI Television Manager // University of Portsmouth

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                • Words in the streets

                  09:01

                  from Azok / Added

                  446 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  3rd place in ISTD student competition 2014. This is a film created for an international competition along with a series of other submissions. It is an action in the streets of Thessaloniki, Greece, using two typefaces: Egyptian Slate Pro and ITC Bodoni Pro. The first one was used in posters, stickers, stencil and graffitis and the second one was used for urban projections on walls, buildings and other public surfaces. The whole idea is that the power of words, combined with the nature of the public space can convey strong messages to people, in times that Greece, as well as the whole world, is suffering. The action was filmed and photographed, and then was placed in the first pages of a Type Specimen, which presents the fonts that were mentioned earlier. You can find photos of the whole project here: http://www.aas.gr/el/ta-nea-mas/anakoinoseis/3o-vraveio-typografias-sta-istd-awards-2014-1633 and here: http://blog.aas.gr/3%CE%BF-%CE%B2%CF%81%CE%B1%CE%B2%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%BF-%CF%84%CF%85%CF%80%CE%BF%CE%B3%CF%81%CE%B1%CF%86%CE%AF%CE%B1%CF%82-%CF%83%CF%84%CE%B1-istd-awards-2014/ Filmed with Canon EOS 5D Mark III & Nikon D3200 Filmed by Mo until 6.24 min Filmed by Azok from 6.25 to 9.01 min Edited by Nick Tao Songs used: Keny Arkana - La Rage (instrumental) Soulkast - We Live Hip Hop (instrumental) Filmed during the cold nights of January 2014.

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                  • UNITY

                    00:47

                    from Sam McCreedy / Added

                    6 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Speech about the unity between the Protestant and Catholic religion within Northern Ireland. Designed for ISTD

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                    • The Creativist — How Creative Are You?

                      00:13

                      from Hanah Vickers / Added

                      80 Plays / / 0 Comments

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