1. IMPASSE

    15:48

    from Beaubois, McClure and Stein / Added

    409 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Impasse by Denis Beaubois, William McClure and Jeff Stein Denis, William and Jeff were core members of Sydney’s Gravity Feed Ensemble. Over 12 yrs Gravity Feed evolved into a unique architectural performance-theatre, employing large sets to create potent, subversive and densely atmospheric events. The work involved movement, objects, sound, light, video and audience as equal partners; it traversed visual arts, architecture and theatre. The tension and synergies between the disciplines fuelled the collaborative process that created each work. The works were undertaken as large-scale site and set-based projects, which investigated new approaches to audience presence and mobility. Impasse pushes the work undertaken in Gravity Feed’s Monstrous Body project [2004] to an experiential extreme. In Monstrous Body one of the major themes was the “impossible space”, a space that limits not only the field of vision, but also the performer’s and audience’s capacity to move. In the creative development phase of Impasse a small prototype was built from 8 large foam cubes to explore a more impossible space devoid of performers and in which an audience must physically struggle to carve out an opening for their body. Brief description of Impasse In its creative development phase Impasse was built from 8 large foam blocks; the ultimate goal is to fill a space with the foam and for visitors to the space to carve out a passage, by physically forcing their way between the cracks of the blocks of foam. If an opening is constructed, then is also filled with light or sound. Part of the idea of the work is to intensify the experience of space upon leaving the installation. The video component involves close up images, shot at 1000 frames per second, of individuals reacting to an explosion, and another of a telephone book that is detonated. Within the context of the installation the video image has a spectral quality and at times sound is used to physically distort the image. The foam blocks are also a source of light and sound – as much as possible the aim of the installation is blur the sense in which sound and light are at a distance – all elements all literally pressing against the body. The ultimate vision for Impasse is of a large installation comprised of up to 50 foam cubes through which a number of bodies can carve out their own passage, stumbling across spaces filled with light and sound and different configurations of densely packed environments. Impasse creative team by Denis Beaubois, William McClure and Jeff Stein Sound Design Nick Wishart Lighting Design Sydney Bouhaniche Production Hedge Video Denis Beaubois

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    • Impasse_short

      06:11

      from Beaubois, McClure and Stein / Added

      210 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Impasse by Denis Beaubois, William McClure and Jeff Stein Denis, William and Jeff were core members of Sydney’s Gravity Feed Ensemble. Over 12 yrs Gravity Feed evolved into a unique architectural performance-theatre, employing large sets to create potent, subversive and densely atmospheric events. The work involved movement, objects, sound, light, video and audience as equal partners; it traversed visual arts, architecture and theatre. The tension and synergies between the disciplines fuelled the collaborative process that created each work. The works were undertaken as large-scale site and set-based projects, which investigated new approaches to audience presence and mobility. Impasse pushes the work undertaken in Gravity Feed’s Monstrous Body project [2004] to an experiential extreme. In Monstrous Body one of the major themes was the “impossible space”, a space that limits not only the field of vision, but also the performer’s and audience’s capacity to move. In the creative development phase of Impasse a small prototype was built from 8 large foam cubes to explore a more impossible space devoid of performers and in which an audience must physically struggle to carve out an opening for their body. Brief description of Impasse In its creative development phase Impasse was built from 8 large foam blocks; the ultimate goal is to fill a space with the foam and for visitors to the space to carve out a passage, by physically forcing their way between the cracks of the blocks of foam. If an opening is constructed, then is also filled with light or sound. Part of the idea of the work is to intensify the experience of space upon leaving the installation. The video component involves close up images, shot at 1000 frames per second, of individuals reacting to an explosion, and another of a telephone book that is detonated. Within the context of the installation the video image has a spectral quality and at times sound is used to physically distort the image. The foam blocks are also a source of light and sound – as much as possible the aim of the installation is blur the sense in which sound and light are at a distance – all elements all literally pressing against the body. The ultimate vision for Impasse is of a large installation comprised of up to 50 foam cubes through which a number of bodies can carve out their own passage, stumbling across spaces filled with light and sound and different configurations of densely packed environments. Impasse creative team by Denis Beaubois, William McClure and Jeff Stein Sound Design Nick Wishart Lighting Design Sydney Bouhaniche Production Hedge Video Denis Beaubois

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      • Jeff Stein On The Cigarette That Saved Heuer

        05:13

        from HODINKEE / Added

        2,547 Plays / / 0 Comments

        In 1971, Heuer sold just 500 chronographs in the United States. Hard to believe, considering two years earlier, they had launched the very first self-winding chronograph movement with the Caliber 11 - found inside the Monaco, Autavia and Carrera. Despite these commercial products, Heuer was still predominantly known as an industrial supply company, providing scientific products to researchers and sportsman. The chronograph's slow sales put Heuer's entire future in jeopardy. Then came a partnership with the number three cigarette company in America. Read on to hear how Heuer's promotion with Viceroy Cigarettes effectively built the Heuer (now TAG Heuer) that we know today, in this detailed feature story by noted Heuer expert Jeff Stein.​ Full story here: http://www.hodinkee.com/ode-to-smoke

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        • The River Eats - Justin Shoulder

          02:25

          from Man of the Tree / Added

          Articulating our fears about contemporary living, Justin Shoulder welcomes us to the Land of One Thousand Distractions. Here all the comforts of the modern world materialise in 3D as you click NEXT. Navigating this terrain is the creature 'Pinky': an over caffeinated, hyperactive, attention-deficient demon. In this fable exploring distraction in the digital age and our changing relationship to the natural environment, the theatre becomes Pinky's landscape as we uncover instinct and primal impulse in Pinky's search for meaning. Devisor/Performer/Costumes: Justin Shoulder Vision Designer: Toby K Original Music: Nick Wales Creative Producer and outside eye: Jeff Stein

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          • The River Eats 10min Excerpt / Justin Shoulder & Collaborators

            10:01

            from Justin Shoulder / Added

            993 Plays / / 4 Comments

            “A beautiful exploration of the estrangements of desire. Truly astonishing.” Theatre Notes Urban mythmakers Justin Shoulder and collaborators create a unique fusion of hand-made craft with live performance, in a spectacular theatrical ceremony. The River Eats charts the journey of Pinky – an over-caffeinated, attention-deficient demon whose identity is undergoing a fantastic metamorphosis. As Pinky’s haunted psyche unravels, we are dragged into a turbulent techno world of mirrors and estrangement. Based on the Taoist notion that every independent entity possesses an inherent opposite, this is an evolutionary tale of instinct navigating a world of material distraction. A standout of Melbourne’s 2012 Next Wave Festival and a sellout at Performance Space Sydney 2013, The River Eats is a visually stunning fable of transformation and desire. Devised, Performed, Costume & Set Design: Justin Shoulder Video and 
Lighting Design: Toby Knyvett Video and SFX: Rebecca Stegh Composer and Sound Design: Nick Wales Creative Producer and Dramaturg: Jeff Stein Stage Manager: Clytie Smith Costume Design Collaborator & Poster Illustration: Matthew Stegh Set Construction: Dillon MacEwan Postcard Design: Joel De Sa Mythic Glamour Mask Collaborator: Nikki Majajas Costume Construction Assistance: Marty Jay, Ami Shoulder, Anthony Aitch, Alistair Watts, Vincent Valentine, Phoebe Hyles, Yasmina Black, Nina Buchanon, Dan Bell, Jackson Stacy, Samara Shehata Video Hypnosis Credits: Editing, VFX and Co-Director: Rebecca Stegh Co-director: Amy Gebhardt Cinematography: Bonnie Elliot The River Eats has been supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body, the City of Melbourne through Arts House, Next Wave Festival, and Performance Space. www.justinshoulder.com

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            • The River Eats Trailer

              01:12

              from Justin Shoulder / Added

              1,579 Plays / / 2 Comments

              “A beautiful exploration of the estrangements of desire. Truly astonishing.” Theatre Notes Urban mythmakers Justin Shoulder and collaborators create a unique fusion of hand-made craft with live performance, in a spectacular theatrical ceremony. The River Eats charts the journey of Pinky – an over-caffeinated, attention-deficient demon whose identity is undergoing a fantastic metamorphosis. As Pinky’s haunted psyche unravels, we are dragged into a turbulent techno world of mirrors and estrangement. Based on the Taoist notion that every independent entity possesses an inherent opposite, this is an evolutionary tale of instinct navigating a world of material distraction. A standout of Melbourne’s 2012 Next Wave Festival, The River Eats is a visually stunning fable of transformation and desire. Devised, Performed, Costume & Set Design: Justin Shoulder Video and 
Lighting Design: Toby Knyvett Video and VFX: Rebecca Stegh Composer and Sound Design: Nick Wales Creative Producer and Dramaturg: Jeff Stein Trailer Credits: Concept and Design: Justin Shoulder Co Director: Amy Gebhardt Cinematography: Bonnie Elliot Editor and VFX: Rebecca Stegh Music: Nick Wales Makeup: Justin Shoulder & Mat Hornby Special Thanks: Matthew Stegh, Violeta Shoulder, Ami Shoulder, Ian Shoulder, Phoebe Woww, Anthony Aitch, Matt Format, Samara Shehata The River Eats has been supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body, the City of Melbourne through Arts House, Next Wave Festival, and Performance Space.

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              • V - Justin Shoulder

                01:45

                from Man of the Tree / Added

                Urban mythmaker Justin Shoulder creates a unique fusion of live performance and theatrical ceremony. Faith speaks of a God that created the angels pure and good, but subjected them to a test. Some passed triumphantly, while others rebelled and were eternally tortured in Hell. These are the devils and demons; implanting passion and obsession, they can utterly derange human faculties. Calling to life a demon for today, the creature ‘V’ is manifest. In a ceremony of the senses the theatre becomes an altar for V to revel in the beauty and horror of contemporary idolatry and its fifteen minutes of fame. Devisor/Performer/Costumes: Justin Shoulder Vision Designer: Toby K Original Music: Nick Wales Creative Producer and outside eye: Jeff Stein

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