1. Patton: What case does Patton make?

    02:56

    from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

    93 Plays / / 0 Comments

    According to Charles M. Province, founder of The George S. Patton Jr. Historical Society and author of several books about General Patton under whom he served with great pride, George Smith Patton, Jr. (1885-1945) was a man of many—even self-contradictory—ways: “He was a noted horseman and polo player, a well-known champion swordsman, and a competent sailor and sportsman . . . an amateur poet . . . a rough and tough soldier, . . . a thoughtful and sentimental man. Unpredictable in his actions, [yet] always dependable . . . outgoing, yet introverted.” Hailing from a military family that traced its lineage back well beyond the American Revolution, Patton was determined already during childhood to become a hero. After graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1909, he received a commission in the United States Army and never left it. He began as a cavalryman and swordsman, but soon became aide to General John J. Pershing, first in Mexico and then in World War I in Europe. There he became an early expert in a new form of battle machine—the tank—which he later used to full effectiveness as commander of the Third Army during World War II. Though they often referred to him as “Old blood and guts” (a description he disliked), most of the men who served with Patton regarded him as a charismatic leader and, despite—or, according to some, because of—his copious use of profanity, an inspirational speaker. He commanded respect not only for his technical expertise, but also for his keen understanding of the human psyche (especially in wartime) and his prodigious knowledge of history and warfare. The much-celebrated movie Patton (made in 1970) makes evident his complex character, his competence, and his view of history as coherent and contiguous. It begins with the famous speech to the troops—in a much cleaned-up version. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host Eliot A. Cohen (Johns Hopkins SAIS) about the story. For a discussion guide and more, visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/courage-and-self-sacrifice-part-2

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    • Shaara: What motivates people to fight in service to their nation? What motivates Chamberlain?

      03:02

      from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

      63 Plays / / 0 Comments

      “Chamberlain” is a chapter from The Killer Angels, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novel about the Battle of Gettysburg, by Michael Shaara (1928-1988). Previously a prolific writer of science fiction and sports stories, Shaara was inspired to write the novel after discovering letters written by his great-grandfather, who had been injured at Gettysburg as a member of the Fourth Georgia Infantry, and after personally visiting the battlefield. Shaara’s narrative is organized into four days—June 30, 1863, the day on which Union and Confederate armies move into Gettysburg; and July 1, 2, and 3, the days of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War—and each day’s events are told from the perspective of one of the commanders of the competing armies. Shaara’s chapter “Chamberlain” focuses on Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1828-1914), commanding officer of the Twentieth Maine, and his efforts (on June 30) to encourage mutineers to re-join the battle. As Shaara will recount in a later chapter, Chamberlain, his regiment out of ammunition, would lead a bayonet charge against the enemy, enabling the Union army to hold Little Round Top and ultimately to win the battle. Not reported by Shaara are the various honors Chamberlain received: for his leadership at Gettysburg and elsewhere, he was, during the war itself, sequentially promoted, eventually achieving the rank of brigadier general. For his heroism at Little Round Top, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. And, at the very end of the war, he was given the honor of receiving, at Appomattox, the surrender of the Confederate infantry. After the Civil War, Chamberlain was elected to four terms as governor of Maine, following which he returned to his alma mater, Bowdoin College, as its president. He died of the unhealed wounds he incurred during his war years. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host Eliot A. Cohen (Johns Hopkins SAIS) about the story. For a discussion guide and more, visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/courage-and-self-sacrifice

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      • Shaara: What case does Chamberlain make to the mutineers?

        02:24

        from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

        42 Plays / / 0 Comments

        “Chamberlain” is a chapter from The Killer Angels, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novel about the Battle of Gettysburg, by Michael Shaara (1928-1988). Previously a prolific writer of science fiction and sports stories, Shaara was inspired to write the novel after discovering letters written by his great-grandfather, who had been injured at Gettysburg as a member of the Fourth Georgia Infantry, and after personally visiting the battlefield. Shaara’s narrative is organized into four days—June 30, 1863, the day on which Union and Confederate armies move into Gettysburg; and July 1, 2, and 3, the days of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War—and each day’s events are told from the perspective of one of the commanders of the competing armies. Shaara’s chapter “Chamberlain” focuses on Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1828-1914), commanding officer of the Twentieth Maine, and his efforts (on June 30) to encourage mutineers to re-join the battle. As Shaara will recount in a later chapter, Chamberlain, his regiment out of ammunition, would lead a bayonet charge against the enemy, enabling the Union army to hold Little Round Top and ultimately to win the battle. Not reported by Shaara are the various honors Chamberlain received: for his leadership at Gettysburg and elsewhere, he was, during the war itself, sequentially promoted, eventually achieving the rank of brigadier general. For his heroism at Little Round Top, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. And, at the very end of the war, he was given the honor of receiving, at Appomattox, the surrender of the Confederate infantry. After the Civil War, Chamberlain was elected to four terms as governor of Maine, following which he returned to his alma mater, Bowdoin College, as its president. He died of the unhealed wounds he incurred during his war years. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host Eliot A. Cohen (Johns Hopkins SAIS) about the story. For a discussion guide and more, visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/courage-and-self-sacrifice

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        • Shaara: How does Chamberlain respond to the mutineers?

          03:01

          from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

          110 Plays / / 0 Comments

          “Chamberlain” is a chapter from The Killer Angels, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novel about the Battle of Gettysburg, by Michael Shaara (1928-1988). Previously a prolific writer of science fiction and sports stories, Shaara was inspired to write the novel after discovering letters written by his great-grandfather, who had been injured at Gettysburg as a member of the Fourth Georgia Infantry, and after personally visiting the battlefield. Shaara’s narrative is organized into four days—June 30, 1863, the day on which Union and Confederate armies move into Gettysburg; and July 1, 2, and 3, the days of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War—and each day’s events are told from the perspective of one of the commanders of the competing armies. Shaara’s chapter “Chamberlain” focuses on Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1828-1914), commanding officer of the Twentieth Maine, and his efforts (on June 30) to encourage mutineers to re-join the battle. As Shaara will recount in a later chapter, Chamberlain, his regiment out of ammunition, would lead a bayonet charge against the enemy, enabling the Union army to hold Little Round Top and ultimately to win the battle. Not reported by Shaara are the various honors Chamberlain received: for his leadership at Gettysburg and elsewhere, he was, during the war itself, sequentially promoted, eventually achieving the rank of brigadier general. For his heroism at Little Round Top, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. And, at the very end of the war, he was given the honor of receiving, at Appomattox, the surrender of the Confederate infantry. After the Civil War, Chamberlain was elected to four terms as governor of Maine, following which he returned to his alma mater, Bowdoin College, as its president. He died of the unhealed wounds he incurred during his war years. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host Eliot A. Cohen (Johns Hopkins SAIS) about the story. For a discussion guide and more, visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/courage-and-self-sacrifice

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          • Altered Egos

            04:47

            from Josh Pulman / Added

            25 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Promo for Bernadette Cremins' new show Altered Egos. Six characters perform on stage and are interviewed in the fictional landscapes.First performance will be in Brighton in March 2012.

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            • Prospero's Revenge

              03:45

              from Podcastrevision / Added

              A fun and entertaining way to understand the story of 'The Tempest' by William Shakespeare. Rewritten lyrics to the tune of 'I Predict a Riot' by the Kaiser Chiefs.

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              • Centre for Creative Arts Promo

                09:08

                from Steve Jones / Added

                702 Plays / / 0 Comments

                The Centre for Creative Arts coordinates 4 annual festivals, Time of the Writer, Durban International Film Festival, JOMBA! Contemporary Dance Festival and Poetry Africa. Based at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

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                • Badgerdog Literary Publishing

                  05:03

                  from Cognitive Films / Added

                  213 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  This video was produced for the Reel Change Film Frenzy, a 48 hour filmmaking competition for a cause in Austin, TX. Ten video production teams are paired up with ten local non-profits to produce a completed (under 5 minute) short film, and it must be shot, edited and delivered in 48 hours. We were paired with Badgerdog Literary Publishing, a nonprofit group committed to developing literary communities. The Reel Change Film Frenzy was presented by the "Lights. Camera. Help." nonprofit film festival and Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. Badgerdog Literary Publishing: http://www.Badgerdog.org Video Production: http://www.cognitivefilms.com

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                  • Why There Are Words Literary Reading Series: January 2012, "Other Voices: Come Together"

                    12:15

                    from Nancy Au / Added

                    3 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Why There Are Words celebrates its second year anniversary in style! Authors read other authors' work as seen here in the final Part 4 of 4. Seth Harwood reads Todd Zuniga (part II) Todd Zuniga reads Seth Harwood

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                    • Emilio Salgari, THE PIRATE PENMAN, Il Corsaro della Penna, ing sub

                      56:22

                      from Igor Mendolia / Added

                      825 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      The Pirate Penman a documentary by Igor Mendolia and Davide Valentini directed by Igor Mendolia 56 minutes Turin, April 25, 1911, about a hundred years ago. Among the trees of the hill a woman discovers the lifeless body of Emilio Salgari. Next door, bloodied, the razor that the writer has used to commit suicide. Veronese origin, author of 85 novels and short stories translated into more than 150 worldwide, Salgari is the father of the literature of adventure in Italy, the inexhaustible author of stories and characters that continue to inhabit the collective imagination. The pirate of the pen, produced by RAI Edu SGI, tells the story the "captain" Emilio, always on the border between truth and fiction, between poverty and success, including material difficulties and a fantasy out of control. Il Corsaro della Penna un documentario di Igor Mendolia e Davide Valentini regia Igor Mendolia 56 minuti Torino, 25 aprile 1911, più o meno cento anni fa. Tra gli alberi della collina una donna scopre il corpo senza vita di Emilio Salgari. Lì accanto, insanguinato, il rasoio che lo scrittore ha usato per suicidarsi. Veronese d'origine, autore di 85 romanzi e oltre 150 racconti tradotti in tutto il mondo, Salgari è il padre della letteratura d'avventura in Italia, l'inesauribile artefice di storie e personaggi che continuano ad abitare l'immaginario collettivo. Il corsaro della penna, prodotto da SGI per Rai Edu, racconta la vita del “capitano” Emilio, sempre al confine tra verità e finzione, tra miseria e successo, tra difficoltà materiali e una fantasia fuori controllo.

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