1. Treating Cancer After Affects

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    from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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    Most people don’t expect another round of therapy once they’ve finished cancer treatment, but it may be necessary to deal with one of cancer’s most common after affects: lymphedema. “It’s a swelling that starts and then doesn’t go away again,” says Jackie Speas, who is a physical therapist with Lee Memorial Health System. Caused by lymph node removal, it’s commonly linked to breast cancer surgery, which disrupts the body’s ability to drain lymphatic fluid. So it accumulates, often in the arms, causing swelling and pain. “If they notice they’re having swelling, they need to get it addressed right away because it’s much easier to treat in the earlier stages,” says Speas. A recent group of studies find that patients don’t always recognize the signs of lymphedema and therefor don’t get timely treatment. Although research shows proper therapy and learning take-home techniques can reduce symptoms. “We train people how to control it themselves, so they know how to do all their self-care,” says Speas. Jackie Speas is a lymphedema therapist with Lee Memorial Health System. She teaches massage and wrapping techniques and the use of compression garments. “It actually feels better and before we ever put the bandage on. We do the massage technique the manual lymph drainage because that helps gets the fluid moving out of the extremity,” says Speas. Exercise has also proved to aid recovery. Specialized programs for women recovering from breast cancer provide a post-surgery boost. “There can be a lot of damage because there’s lack of lymph nodes and they can end up with some swelling in the arm. And we do have services for lymphedema rehab,” says Pat Curr, who is a physical therapist with Lee Memorial Health System. Like cancer itself, finding lymphedema early and treating it appropriately makes for the best outcomes. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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    • It’s All Personal in Palliative Care

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      from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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      “I was stage 3,” says Jennifer Santerre. And facing the fight of her life. Jennifer Santerre made it through a grueling trifecta of treatment for breast cancer: surgery, radiation and chemo. She thought the worst was behind her. But she was wrong. “I didn’t realize until later on my diagnosis had done so much bone degeneration and nerve damage. And so I had all this extra pain,” says Santerre. That’s when Jennifer was introduced to palliative care. “Honestly, the first thing I did was go to the dictionary an look it up,” says Santerre. “It’s really about putting the patient in the center,” says Dr. Colleen Tallen, who is a palliative care specialist for Lee Memorial Health System. A rapidly growing arm of medicine, palliative care focuses on the patient instead of their illness. “Looking at their spiritual, their emotional, their financial situation. So our team has experts in all of those areas,” says Dr. Tallen. Many times, seriously ill patients find they’re living in a new reality: one that doesn’t fit as well. Having a personal team connects them to the resources they need to make a smoother transition. “I had five, five caretakers sit down with me and do an intake. A dietitian, a pharmacist, all sitting there listening to my story and going through my personal needs. And that was amazing to me-I said I have a group of people who are here for me,” says Santerre. Jennifer got help with pain management and treatment for lymphedema, a swelling caused by lymph node removal. While specialized health care is successful in healing, it can be uncomfortable. “We’re doing really well in medicine, keeping people alive and thriving. Whether it be things like heart failure or lung disease like COPD. People are surviving after cancer. But then you go home and you realize so many things are different,” says Dr. Tallen. Whether it’s physical, financial or emotional, the palliative care team takes it personally. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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      • Lymphedema

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        from Laura Maier / Added

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        This video is about Lymphedema

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        • Swiss DolorClast® : Lymphedema - (RSWT®) Radial Shock Wave Therapy

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          from EMS Electro Medical Systems SA / Added

          Swiss DolorClast®, Radial Shock Wave Therapy (RSWT®) : Lymphedema Lymphedema may be primary or secondary. Primary lymphedema is a lymphatic malformation developing during the later stage of lymphangiogenesis. In contrast, secondary lymphedema is the result of disruption or obstruction of the lymphatic system. Secondary lymphedema can occur as a consequence of tumors, surgery, infection, inflammation, radiation therapy and trauma. Secondary lymphedema is one of the most significant complications after the surgical treatment of breast cancer, with significant impact on the quality of life. A substantial number of women develop secondary lymphedema after surgical treatment of breast cancer, with reported incidence between 6% and 63% depending on the population studied, the measurement criteria used and the reported length of follow-up. Lymphedema is divided in three stages. Stage IA (latent lymphedema) presents without clinical evidence of edema, but with impaired lymph transport capacity. Stage IB (initial lymphedema) is characterized by edema that totally or partially decreases by rest and draining position. In Stage IIA (increasing lymphedema) vanishing lymph transport capacity is seen and fibroindurative skin changes appear. Stage IIB (column shaped limb fibrolymphedema) presents with lymphostatic skin changes and worsening disability. In Stage IIIA (elephantiasis) scleroindurative pachydermitis and papillomatous lymphostatic verrucosis is observed together with life-threatening disability, and Stage IIIIB is extreme elephantiasis with total disability. Diagnosis of lymphedema is based on the clinical features of the disease (extremity circumference measurement before and after surgery; a difference of more than 2 cm points to the development of lymphedema). Diagnostic imaging (plain radiographs, duplex ultrasonography, radionuclide lymphoscintigraphy and other imaging modalities) should be considered to rule out other causes of increased extremity circumferences, or to establish the diagnosis of lymphedema when in doubt. Treatment should start with manual lymphatic drainage and compression bandage-centered decongestive lymphatic therapy. An alternative is sequential intermittent pneumatic compression using pumping devices. Radial shock wave therapy (RSWT) has been demonstrated being efficient for lymphedema stages IIA and IIB. Surgery should be considered for recalcitrant cases of lymphedema not responding or responding poorly to the aforementioned treatment options. Surgical options include lympho-venous or lympho-venous-lymphatic bypass anastomosis, lympho-lymphatic segmental interposition, free lymph node transplantation, and ablative surgery in case of massive limb changes or fibrotic induration.

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          • Lymphedema Management Products

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            from ton / Added

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            http://www.acols.com Provide trusted products at low prices with great customer service,

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            • Less is More For Lymph Node Removal

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              from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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              It frequently fell into the category of unintended consequences. In an effort to aggressively combat breast cancer, women were losing lymph nodes. That often resulted in a loss of quality of life. Surgeons are now rethinking the practice. “I think we’re getting more and more away from lymph nodes, which really creates a lot of side effects, a lot of complications with lymphedema,” says Dr. Rie Aihara, surgical oncologist on Lee Memorial Health System’s medical staff. It was not uncommon for women to find themselves battling lymphedema, a life-long swelling that occurs when fewer lymph nodes are available to distribute lymphatic fluid. Many also required post-op therapies to alleviate severe pain and reduced range of motion. “There’s a lot of scaring involved and limited range of motion in usually the shoulder and sometimes the neck and thoracic region. A lot of times they cannot reach into cabinets or do their hair. Sometimes they actually need someone to help them with showering,” says Pat Curr, Lee Memorial Health System physical therapist. Comprehensive studies were done to find out if lymph node removal was necessary to treat invasive breast cancer. The conclusion was ‘no’ years ago surgeons removed 20 to 30 lymph nodes from armpit, now it’s believed that less is more. “If there were cancer cells regardless of how big the deposits were, we used to remove all the lymph nodes. But with this new data- a group of women who had these lymph nodes that were positive who went on to axillary node dissection vs. those that didn’t and the conclusion was there really were no difference. It just added risk,” says Dr. Aihara. It’s a conservative approach to breast cancer, that’s leaving women cancer-free and clear of a major complication. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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              • Below Knee Compression Bandage.mp4

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                from Rhian Noble-Jones / Added

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                Educational 8 minute film clip to support community nurses who have done some training on compression bandaging for chronic oedema or lymphoedema

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                • Full Leg Compression Bandage.mp4

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                  from Rhian Noble-Jones / Added

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                  This educational 4 minute clip is aimed at community nurses who have already undertaken some training in compression bandaging.

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                  • Keeping Lymphedema Under Wraps

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                    from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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                    Cancer is a tough diagnosis to treat, and sometimes when it’s over, you’re still not done. During treatment for some cancers, lymph nodes are removed or destroyed. It can cause a condition called lymphedema. “It’s a swelling that does not go away. It’s not like a regular edema that comes and goes; it’s a swelling that starts and then doesn’t go away again,” says Jackie Speas, lymphedema therapist with Lee Memorial Health System. What happens is lymphatic fluid, which includes water and protein molecules, starts to accumulate with fewer lymph nodes to accommodate it. “It takes a number of years for it to progress. If they notice they’re having swelling they need to get it addressed right away because it’s much easier to treat in the earlier stages,” says Speas. Managing lymphedema becomes a control issue. Using a combination of massage techniques and tightly wrapping the affected area, patients are taught how to keep the fluid moving and prevent it from bloating. “We do the massage technique, the manual lymph drainage, because that helps gets the fluid moving out of the extremity. Then we bandage it and then we have them do an exercise program,” says Speas. Lymphedema is frequently linked to breast cancer. “There can be a lot of damage because there’s lack of lymph nodes and they can end up with some swelling in the arm,” says Pat Curr, physical therapist with Lee Memorial Health System. In patients who have progressed to full-blown lymphedema, wrapping and compressing the affected limb restricts the ability to swell. “Some people feel that because they’ve survived the cancer and they had the surgery, that they have to live with these limitations. And they really don’t,” says Curr. Keeping lymphedema under wraps is helping cancer patients move forward in life. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                    • St Luke's Therapy Services of Sevierville (865) 453-9022

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                      from A.B / Added

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                      http://www.stlukestherapysevier.com St Luke's Therapy Services of Sevierville 1014 Middle Creek Road Sevierville TN 37862 (865) 453-9022 With a service oriented staff and state-of-the-art facilities, St. Luke 's Therapy Services of Sevierville provides excellent patient care and comprehensive rehabilitation services to our community.

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