1. Динозавры - Красивая сказка или правдивая быль?

    04:36

    from Mihai Dohot / Added

    9 Plays / / 0 Comments

    153. Военная тайна. (эфир_03.09.2012)

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    • Abigail McEwen: Archiving Modern Latin American Art: Sites, Students and Collaboration in the Greater Washington Area

      01:08:30

      from MITH in MD / Added

      Abigail McEwen, Assistant Professor of Latin American Art Department of Art History and Archeology, University of Maryland Monday, April 1, 2013

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      • Alexis Lothian Digital Dialogue: From Transformative Works to #transformDH: Digital Humanities as (Critical) Fandom

        58:43

        from MITH in MD / Added

        Alexis Lothian, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies University of Maryland College Park MITH Conference Room Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 12:30 pm The identity of the field, network, discourse, or discipline of “Digital Humanities” is a source of endless discussion among its practitioners and critics – from conflicting genealogies of humanities computing and new media studies, to the gendered and raced institutional logics critiqued in the recent Differences issue on “The Dark Side of Digital Humanities.” This talk aims to chart an alternative path through the welter of definitional tangles by reinterpreting the world of digital humanities by taking seriously one of its more informal dimensions: the fervor with which digital humanist nerds and geeks appreciate their objects of study. I argue that digital humanities is a fandom – and that there is much to learn from attending to its processes and practices through the lenses developed both by fan studies scholars and by fans themselves. Participants in creative fan communities have theorized their own knowledge production as in conversation with, yet distinct from both media industrial and academic models; drawing from these approaches enables us to understand “digital humanities” as a phenomenon that need not be contained within the bounds of the academy. Drawing attention to the examples of the fannish nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works and the digital humanities network #transformDH, I will pay special attention to the theory and praxis of critical fandom: the ways in which members of fan communities use diverse creative techniques to challenge and critique the structures and representations around which their communities are organized. Understanding digital humanities as critical fandom makes it possible to focus on the affective dimensions that shape it and the contradictory logics that permeate its relationship to the disciplines and institutions that provide its context. Alexis Lothian is a interdisciplinary scholar of queer and feminist media and cultural studies with a focus on speculative fiction, digital media, and online fandom. She lives in the Washington, DC area and is a tenure track Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies at University of Maryland College Park, where she teaches in the LGBT Studies program and the undergraduate honors program in Design | Culture and Creativity. Lothian is presently developing a book manuscript based on her PhD dissertation, “Deviant Futures: Speculative Fiction and Queer Time,” while also working on what will become a second monograph on critical and social justice-oriented fan cultures and participating in collaborative work as part of the TransformDH collective. Read more on her research page. Lothian is also a participant in feminist science fiction and media fandom, with a specific interest in the ways fan communities engage in critical theorizing and activism (for example, through online discussion and fan video). She uses some of these forms in her own scholarly work, in addition to standard academic practices.

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        • Alex Wright Digital Dialogue: The Platonic Network

          58:40

          from MITH in MD / Added

          Alex Wright, Author, Designer and Researcher at Etsy MITH Conference Room Tuesday, November 11, 2014 at 12:30 pm In 1934, a little-known Belgian bibliographer named Paul Otlet described something very much like the World Wide Web, sketching out plans for a network of “electric telescopes” connecting people to a vast collection of documents, images, and audio-visual material. He dubbed the whole thing the Mundaneum, describing it as a “réseau mondial” – a worldwide web. Why should anyone still pay attention to the failed schemes of a long-dead Belgian bibliographer? Otlet’s work matters today not just as a kind of historical curio, but because he envisioned a radically different kind of network: one driven not by corporate profit and personal vanity, but by a utopian vision of intellectual progress, social egalitarianism, and even spiritual liberation. This presentation will delve deep into Otlet’s alternative vision of a global network, in search of useful lessons that could reshape our understanding of what the Web could yet become. Alex Wright is the Director of Research at Etsy and the former Director of User Experience and Product Research at The New York Times. He is also a professor of interaction design at The School of Visual Arts and the author of Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age (Oxford University Press, 2014). He has previously led interaction design and research projects for IBM, Yahoo!, The Long Now Foundation and the California Digital Library, among others. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Wilson Quarterly, The Believer, and Harvard Magazine, among others.

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          • Alison Booth Digital Dialogue: "Prosopography and Crowding Attention"

            01:04:02

            from MITH in MD / Added

            Alison Booth, Professor of English University of Virginia MITH Conference Room Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 12:30 pm Almost a century ago, Virginia Woolf lamented the absence of biographies of housemaids in the great national prosopography circa 1900, The Dictionary of National Biography. Recent feminist scholarship continues to overlook other widespread records of women’s lives in print well before 1900, in collective biographies. Booth’s book, How to Make It as a Woman, called attention to this genre of prosopography, a rich repository of networked nonfiction narratives with far more varied female roles than in novels or sermons of the same period. Collective Biographies of Women (CBW) (Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities) is a digital platform for research on more than 8600 persons and 13,400 narratives in 1200 books (most by men, published primarily 1830-1940) in the bibliography (Scholars’ Lab). CBW devised an XML stand-aside schema, Biographical Elements and Structure Schema (BESS), to develop a morphology of this genre, locating types of elements of biography at the level of the paragraph, within samples of collections. In planned collaboration with Social Networks and Archival Contexts and other prosopographies, we will contribute the only comprehensive study of printed biographies of women to the quest for global unique identifiers for all known persons. This talk addresses the implications of digital prosopography. CBW’s approach captures narrative forms and ideology in printed books that constructed anachronistic documentary social networks: representational cohorts with different degrees of separation rather than archival records indicating networks of correspondence, kinship, or other historical links. Examples from BESS analysis of networks of biographies in sample corpora (Frances Trollope, Sister Dora, and Lola Montez as nodal women in selected texts with hundreds of short biographies of women) will illustrate the project.  CBW bridges distant and close reading, in a mid-range reading to investigate how printed books reshaped representations of women for Anglophone readers.

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            • Allan Renear: An Eliminativist Ontology of the Digital World—and What It Means for Data Curation

              01:17:00

              from MITH in MD / Added

              Allen Renear, Interim Dean and Professor Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS), University of Illinois Tuesday, October 15, 2013

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              • Amanda French: "Sheesh, What's With All the THATCamps?"

                23:07

                from MITH in MD / Added

                Amanda French, THATCamp Coordindator Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media Oct 16, 2012

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                • ANCIENT MITH @ INTERNATIONAL Part1

                  00:42

                  from koliapov Production / Added

                  58 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  http://www.koliapov.com ANCIENT MITH Live @ INTERNATIONAL Paris 11 AVRIL 2011 /w QWEL&MAKER + SIGNAL2 LES SOIREES DU BARON KOLIAPOV

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                  • ANCIENT MITH - teaser 2011

                    01:15

                    from koliapov Production / Added

                    68 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    ANCIENT MITH Live @ INTERNATIONAL Paris 11 AVRIL 2011 /w QWEL&MAKER + SIGNAL2 LES SOIREES DU BARON KOLIAPOV

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                    • Andrew Johnston Digital Dialogue: Models of Code and the Digital Architecture of Time

                      01:06:23

                      from MITH in MD / Added

                      Andrew Johnston, Assistant Professor of English North Carolina State University MITH Conference Room Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 12:30pm Episodes from a History of Animation, which traces the emergence of real-time computer graphics and animation in the 1970s. Focusing especially on a programming language developed through funding from the National Science Foundation and that language’s use at the art and engineering collective called the Circle Graphics Habitat at the University of Illinois, Chicago, this presentation provides an archaeology of how time and models of perception are coded within early digital graphics systems. The talk will show how animation was fundamental to the creation of these real-time systems, not only because filmmakers worked on the code and platforms that were used, but also because these technologies were built around understandings of time and action taken from cinema. Through an analysis of this history, the presentation argues that real-time computer graphics mark an epistemological shift around the interdependencies of film and other media as well as a broader transformation in the mid-twentieth century of how technologies were modeling perception. Andrew Johnston is an Assistant Professor in the Film Studies Program, the Program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media, and the Department of English at North Carolina State University. His forthcoming book, Pulses of Abstraction: Episodes from a History of Animation (University of Minnesota Press), is a theoretical and historical investigation of abstract animation in cinema and computational media from the 1950s through the 1970s. His research on film history, aesthetic theory, media archaeology, and avant-garde film has appeared in books and journals such as Color and the Moving Image, Animating Film Theory, Animation: Behind the Silver Screen, Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture, and The Moving Image. He is currently completing a series of articles about the historical development of Computer-Generated Imagery from the 1960s through the 1980s and methods of archiving and transcoding these works on contemporary platforms.

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