1. Songs of India

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    Musical Bridges Around the World Presents Songs of India Presenting Five Genres of Indian Music GENRE I Carnatic Classical Music Sujata Venkateswar, Vocals Sita Jayant, Violin Ganesh Devarajan, Mridangam Srinivas Ponnappan, Kanjira Uthra Suresh, Madhuri Venkateswar, Anand Srinivas, Back Up Vocals GENRE II Hindustani Classical Music Indrajit Banerjee, Sitar Shantilal Shah, Tabla GENRE III Ghazal Hemant Kulkarni, Vocals and Harmonium Mohan Singh, Tabla GENRE IV Rabindra Sangeet Sujata Venkateswar, Female Vocal Indrajit Banerjee, Male Vocal Madhuri Venkateswar, Piano Evan Guz, Guitar GENRE V Thaaye Yasoda Sujata Venkateswar, Aamuktha Karla, Madhuri Venkateswar, Vocals Renuka Rege, Jahnavi Shriram, Mohini Dasari, Pooja Nagarkar Shachi Daru, Swetha Kotamraju, Maya Iyer, Kavita Venkateswar, Dancer Sujata Venkateswar, Artistic Director Greg Hinojosa, Show Director Billy Munoz, Lighting Designer Cherylann Williams, Sound Engineer Archana Singh, Stage Decorations 3:00 pm, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011 McAllister Auditorium, San Antonio, Texas India’s musical history dates back to the prehistoric times and is in fact regarded as one of the oldest in the world. One of oldest music forms known as Sama was developed during the Vedic period which stretched from 1500 to 500 BC. India’s music is a combination of vocal music, instrumental music, and dance called Sangeet. Prior to the 13th century, there was primarily one type of musical form. But with the invasion of the Mughals, the music of north and central India blended with the Mughal influences of Arabia and Persia, bringing into being Hindustani music. Today there are two major traditions of classical music. The North Indian classical music is known as Hindustani Sangeet, while the south Indian classical music is called Carnatic music. Indian classical music is based on the ragas, which are scales and melodies that provide the foundation for a performance. Unlike western classical music that is deterministic, Indian classical music allows for a much greater degree of “personalization” of the performance, almost to the level of jazz-like improvisation. When a raga is accompanied by percussion (such as a tabla), the rhythm is often rather intricate because it is constructed from a combination of fundamental rhythmic patterns (or talas). The most common instruments used in Hindustani Classical music are sitar, sarod, flute, and sarangi. Carnatic (Southern Indian) ragas constitute one of the oldest systems of music in the world. They are based on seven rhythmic cycles and 72 fundamental ragas. Carnatic music is mostly vocal and devotional in nature and played with instruments such as the mridangam drum, the ghatam clay pot, and the violin or veena. The fundamental format of Carnatic songs is the “kriti” or composition, which are usually set in the style of a raga (the raga serves as the melodic foundation). The golden age of Carnatic music was the 1700s-1800s when the Trinity of Carnatic music, namely Thyagaraja, Syama Sastri and Muthuswamy Dikshitar, contributed immensely in terms of compositions, new ragas and changes in concert pattern. Indian music is diverse because of India’s cultural diversity. The spectrum of Indian music includes folk music, ghazals, bhajans, qawalis, popular movie music and fusion music that blends the east with the west. While Indian music is constantly evolving to adapt to contemporary ideas and themes, the experimental and new continues to co-exist with the traditional and timeless, reflecting the depth and richness of the Indian culture. musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2011 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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    • MBAW-SF-042813-03 "Vocalise" Op.34 No.14 by Sergei Rachmaninoff ( 1873-1943)

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      MUSICAL BRIDGES AROUND THE WORLD SEASON 15 Judy and Jefferson Crabb Musical Evenings at San Fernando Cathedral presents Fantasia for Cello with Boris Andrianov, Cello and Michael Schneider, Piano "Vocalise" Op.34 No.14 by Sergei Rachmaninoff ( 1873-1943) BORIS ANDRIANOV is one of the most gifted Russian musicians of his generation. He won third prize in the 11th International Tchaikovsky Competition (Moscow, 1998) and first prize in the International Cello Antonio Janigro Competition (Zagreb, Croatia). In 1997, Boris was the first Russian cellist to become a laureate at the Sixth International Rostropovich competition in Paris. In 2002, DELOS Record Label released his CD with music for cello and guitar. This recording was at the preliminary list for a Grammy Award nomination. His recent appearances include concerts in Holland (Concertgebouw), Japan (Tokyo Opera City), Germany (Berliner Philharmonie), Austria (Wiener Konzerthaus), Switzerland, USA, Slovakia, Slovenia, Italy, France, South Africa and others. Since 2005, Boris has played a Montagnana cello from the Russian State Collection. Critics have hailed MICHAEL SCHNEIDER as “a pianist with exceptional insight,” at venues including Carnegie’s Weill Recital Hall, the International Chopin Festival at the château of George Sand in France, the Music Festival in the Hamptons, and the 8th Annual Paderewski Festival in California. Michael recently performed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., in Mexico and in the famed Liszt Museum in Budapest. Michael was a featured guest artist at the Bicentennial Chopin Festival in Nohant, France in July 2010. In the fall of 2010, Michael was a visiting adjunct professor of piano at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton, TX. He holds a doctorate degree from University of Texas in Austin. April 28, 2013 San Antonio, Texas

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      • Songs of India

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        Musical Bridges Around the World Presents Songs of India Presenting Five Genres of Indian Music GENRE I Carnatic Classical Music Sujata Venkateswar, Vocals Sita Jayant, Violin Ganesh Devarajan, Mridangam Srinivas Ponnappan, Kanjira Uthra Suresh, Madhuri Venkateswar, Anand Srinivas, Back Up Vocals GENRE II Hindustani Classical Music Indrajit Banerjee, Sitar Shantilal Shah, Tabla GENRE III Ghazal Hemant Kulkarni, Vocals and Harmonium Mohan Singh, Tabla GENRE IV Rabindra Sangeet Sujata Venkateswar, Female Vocal Indrajit Banerjee, Male Vocal Madhuri Venkateswar, Piano Evan Guz, Guitar GENRE V Thaaye Yasoda Sujata Venkateswar, Aamuktha Karla, Madhuri Venkateswar, Vocals Renuka Rege, Jahnavi Shriram, Mohini Dasari, Pooja Nagarkar Shachi Daru, Swetha Kotamraju, Maya Iyer, Kavita Venkateswar, Dancer Sujata Venkateswar, Artistic Director Greg Hinojosa, Show Director Billy Munoz, Lighting Designer Cherylann Williams, Sound Engineer Archana Singh, Stage Decorations 3:00 pm, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011 McAllister Auditorium, San Antonio, Texas India’s musical history dates back to the prehistoric times and is in fact regarded as one of the oldest in the world. One of oldest music forms known as Sama was developed during the Vedic period which stretched from 1500 to 500 BC. India’s music is a combination of vocal music, instrumental music, and dance called Sangeet. Prior to the 13th century, there was primarily one type of musical form. But with the invasion of the Mughals, the music of north and central India blended with the Mughal influences of Arabia and Persia, bringing into being Hindustani music. Today there are two major traditions of classical music. The North Indian classical music is known as Hindustani Sangeet, while the south Indian classical music is called Carnatic music. Indian classical music is based on the ragas, which are scales and melodies that provide the foundation for a performance. Unlike western classical music that is deterministic, Indian classical music allows for a much greater degree of “personalization” of the performance, almost to the level of jazz-like improvisation. When a raga is accompanied by percussion (such as a tabla), the rhythm is often rather intricate because it is constructed from a combination of fundamental rhythmic patterns (or talas). The most common instruments used in Hindustani Classical music are sitar, sarod, flute, and sarangi. Carnatic (Southern Indian) ragas constitute one of the oldest systems of music in the world. They are based on seven rhythmic cycles and 72 fundamental ragas. Carnatic music is mostly vocal and devotional in nature and played with instruments such as the mridangam drum, the ghatam clay pot, and the violin or veena. The fundamental format of Carnatic songs is the “kriti” or composition, which are usually set in the style of a raga (the raga serves as the melodic foundation). The golden age of Carnatic music was the 1700s-1800s when the Trinity of Carnatic music, namely Thyagaraja, Syama Sastri and Muthuswamy Dikshitar, contributed immensely in terms of compositions, new ragas and changes in concert pattern. Indian music is diverse because of India’s cultural diversity. The spectrum of Indian music includes folk music, ghazals, bhajans, qawalis, popular movie music and fusion music that blends the east with the west. While Indian music is constantly evolving to adapt to contemporary ideas and themes, the experimental and new continues to co-exist with the traditional and timeless, reflecting the depth and richness of the Indian culture. Musical Bridges Around the World was founded in 1998 by Artistic Director Dr. Anya Grokhovski (Concert Pianist) It is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization. "Please Become A Member" musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr Sterling Abrigo standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2011 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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        • "Flight of the Bumblebee" : Rimski Korsakov / Rachmaninoff

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          Bumblebee in My Living Room- It all started with the simple question to my husband – what shall I learn for the 2012 / HAPPY NEW YEAR video? It has to be something short, flashy and very, very happy. Bumblebee, Robert said, without thinking twice. “What a fresh idea!” I thought, and engaged on a YouTube journey. After listening to about 25 different Bumblebees, some in killer arrangements, I found one by Rachmaninov. And it was love at first site. "Flight of the Bumblebee" is an orchestral interlude written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera, The Tale of Tsar Saltan, composed in 1899–1900. The piece closes Act III, Tableau 1, during which the magic Swan-Bird changes Prince Gvidon into an insect so that he can fly away to visit his father (who does not know that he is alive). To make a long story short … There were three sisters (a good one and two ugly ones, just like in Cinderella), and the two ugly sisters made the lives of the good sister and her son, Prince Gvidon, miserable. So…Prince Gvidon turns into a bumblebee (temporarily) and flies to his father’s house (kingdom)…and stings his lovely aunts on the face. Rimski-Korsakov is a fantastic Symphonist, because the innovative instrumentation in his fairytales, operas and symphonies are very vivid. You can see the water, hear the storms…insects…bumblebees. Remember Scheherazade? This is his as well. There were three composers/virtuoso pianists in the history of western music and Rachmaninov is one of them. He knew the craft of playing piano so well, that no matter what piece of music he touched, he turned it into pianistic gold. There is no inconvenient and unnecessary wrist turns, and as we pianists say, “everything is under the fingers”. He turned Bumblebee, a complicated and confusing piece of music that gets played on all possible instruments into a piece of cake – a virtuoso kind of cake. I have bean married for almost 5 years now to Robert, who spent most of his adult life being a physician in the Air Force. When we got married, he knew I was a pianist but he had no idea what it meant. I do not think he would have ever anticipated listening to Flight of the Bumblebee in a high register and in the process of memorization (when every phrase gets repeated more than a few times) with the average daily practice time fluctuating between two and four hours. I am glad he did not know it, or I am sure he would have thought twice before marrying me! But on the other hand, he gets the privilege of pointing out wrong notes to me – THE Artistic Director, and concert pianist! Who else in life gets such a treat? He has truly made it… A.

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          • MBAW-2011-01-NewsCast

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            My friend Lilya Post DateIcon Tuesday, 08 June 2010 "… An’ I am in Texas until the 13th, call me…what’s up?" It was a message from Lilya Zilberstein, who is currently teaching and performing at Texas Christian University International Piano Academy and Festival in Fort Worth. In 1984, I became a student of piano performance and pedagogy at the prestigious Gnessin’s State Musical College in Moscow, It was an exciting time to be there because we were among the best pianists in the country. All of us were trying to break into the larger performing arts world. We practiced 4-6 hours a day and, of course, partied like you would expect kids in our early twenties to do. A few years later, I ran into Lilya Zilberstein in the cafeteria. She was a freshmen, a modest girl with a long dark braid and a friendly smile. She was 22 at the time, and the best of the best at the school. She was practicing for the Ferruccio Busoni International Piano Competition, one of the most prestigious competitions for pianists from all over the world. Its program lasts 3 hours, playing the most difficult pieces, all memorized, as well as a piano concerto with the orchestra. After a preliminary audition process, competitors play 3 rounds. After each round, a big group of players will go home, and a few will advance. In 1987, Russia was still part of the Soviet Union, so it was difficult to attend such a competition in the West. The country was closed for Russians to go abroad on any sort of business unless the government granted an exit visa. To secure this exit visa, participants from Russia had to be selected through an audition process at their own Universities and Conservatories, then they competed again for a special jury at the National level. Only after winning that national competition were they allowed to attend and compete with other pianists from all over the world. Russia would send no more than 2-4 people to play at the largest competitions (out 30-40 the best players from all over the country). I believe this system is similar to competition for Olympics sports. The Soviet government took pride in Soviet athletes, ballet dancers and musicians. They wanted to show to the world that the Soviet system surpassed others, and it worked. The best part was that the Soviet government paid all travel expenses for the fortunate winners. Lilya made it through all of these seemingly endless barriers. Her beautiful warm sound, impeccable taste, and brilliant technique earned her first prize and made her an audience favorite at the International Ferruccio Busoni Competition in Italy Bolzano in 1987. What a VICTORY! And it was just the beginning! She and her husband Sasha–a talented trumpet player from our university–emigrated to Germany. With their first baby on the way, Lilya was offered a fantastic recording contract by Deutche Grammophone in 1990. In 1989, my family and I emigrated to the U.S., life got busy, and Lilya and I lost touch with each other. Occasionally, I would hear bits and pieces about her performing life … at a festival in Switzerland, a four-hand performance with Martha Argerich … Lilya plays with Abbado … London Symphony ... La Scala Orchestra in Milan ... NHK Tokyo … and many more. In the fall of 2007, I suddenly got a phone call from Lilya. She was coming to San Antonio to play with our symphony. She played Rachmaninov, Paganini Variations and it was FABULOUS! Mike Greensburg wrote "Lilya is one of the finest pianists of our time." And he is right! Her interpretations are iconic, her emotions are never overstated or understated, but always perfect. She plays classical music like the timeless work it is. I enjoyed Lilya's visit, learned that her baby-to-be became a talented pianist, and got a younger brother. Now both children are playing together with their famous mother, who is very supportive and encouraging. And the funny thing was that it felt like we were 23 again and had never parted. I am truly honored to bring Lilya to perform for Musical Bridges in January 2011. San Antonio Symphony and Musical Bridges are sharing Lilya for two weekends. She will stay with me, we will share the latest family news, and create fantastic musical fantasies for future seasons. Her program with Musical Bridges will include a lot of my favorites: Appasionata, Chopin Variations Brilliante and Consolations by Liszt. I am also very grateful to Carol Lee Klose and Carolyn A. Seale for sponsoring Lilya's appearance at Musical Bridges. Born in Moscow in 1965, Lilya Zilberstein began to play the piano when she was five. From 1971 she studied under Ada Traub at the Gnessin Music School in Moscow, graduating there with the highest distinction in 1983. She continued her studies with Alexander Satz at the Gnessin Pedagogical Institute, where she took her final examination in 1988. Winner of a series of Soviet competitions Lilya's international success came in 1987 when she one First Prize - and the Audience Prize - in the Ferruccio Busoni International Piano Competition in Bolzano. In May 1988 Lilya Zilberstein began her first extended tour of the West, starting in Italy where she made triumphant débuts at the Maggio Musicale Festival in Florence and at the Festival of Pianists at Bergamo and Brescia. Further concerts followed in the USA, including a recital at the First New York International Festival of the Arts, in Germany (Dresden Staatskapelle), Austria and France. She returned to Japan in January 1994 and made her UK début with the London Symphony Orchestra the same year. Since then she has place at the Concertgebouw Amsterdam, with the Chicago Symphony and James Levine at the Ravinia Festival, and regularly with the Berlin Philharmonic under Claudio Abbado since her début with them in 1991. Lilya Zilberstein has made many recordings for Deutsche Grammophon, including solo piano works by Rachmaninov, Shostakovich, Brahms, Liszt, Schubert, Mussorgsky, Taneyev and Medtner. Her concerto recordings include the Grieg concerto with the Gothenburg Symphony and Järvi, as well as Rachmaninov's Second and Third Piano Concertos with Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic. Musical Bridges Around the World was founded in 1998 by Artistic Director Dr. Anya Grokhovski (Concert Pianist) It is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization. "Please Become A Member" musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2011 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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            • Musical Evenings at San Fernando Cathedral / Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 3

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              Musical Bridges Around The World presents Judy and Jefferson Crabb
Musical Evenings at San Fernando Cathedral history, spirit, & music meet January 29/2012 As part of the City-wide Beethoven Festival we present Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 3 E-flat major Opus 12 Allegro con spirito Adagio con molta espressione Rondo: Allegro molto Performed by Emanuel Borok / violin Elena Portnaya / pianist Sunday evening at 6:30pm FREE and Open to the Public! 115 Main Plaza in the oldest cathedral in the nation Emanuel Borok, former Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra since 1985, has had a distinguished career as a soloist, chamber musician, and orchestral leader. Before coming to Dallas, Mr. Borok served for 11 seasons as Associate Concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Concertmaster of the Boston Pops Orchestra. Born and trained in the Soviet Union, Mr. Borok received his master degree from Gnessin Music Academy in Moscow. Among his chamber music partners are Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Shlomo Mintz, Emanuel Ax, Yefim Bronfman, Joshua Bell, Sarah Chang and Paul Neubauer. Emanuel Borok was also featured in the Distinguished Artists Recital Series at the 92nd Street Y, in New York. Conservatory, and laureate of numerous international piano competitions. Elena has performed solo and in chamber ensembles in Russia, Poland, England, Portugal, Argentina, Italy, Switzerland and the United States. She became a Doctor of Musical Arts in 2009, when she completed her doctorate at the University of Texas at Austin. She loves to work with singers and has therefore worked as a rehearsal pianist for four seasons at the Butler Opera Center at UT Austin. During 2010 and 2011, she was one of the Houston Grand Opera Studio artists, working on the preparation of Madame Butterfly, Dead Man Walking and Ariadne auf Naxos, under the baton of the maestro Patrick Summers. Elena is a permanent collaborator with her husband, violinist Mark Cheikhet, and they are raising two little daughters together Right in the heart of downtown San Antonio This series was designed after the European model of free concerts in historic destinations like Venice, Florence, and Amsterdam. Our Sunday evening concerts entice listeners to explore the location of several buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places. San Fernando, the oldest cathedral in the U.S., abuts the Bexar County Courthouse and between them, a revitalized Main Plaza leads to the Riverwalk, a top Texas tourist destination. Concerts are produced at San Fernando Cathedral on select Sundays, featuring world-class classical musicians. All listeners are invited to meet the artists at the catered dessert reception following every concert. "Please Become A Member" http://www.musicalbridges.org http://www.facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 http://www.musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr Sterling Abrigo standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2010 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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              • Musical Evenings at San Fernando Cathedral / Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 2

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                Musical Bridges Around The World presents Judy and Jefferson Crabb
Musical Evenings at San Fernando Cathedral history, spirit, & music meet January 29/2012 As part of the City-wide Beethoven Festival we present Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 2 A major Opus 12 Allegro vivace Andante, più tosto allegretto Allegro piacevole Performed by Emanuel Borok / violin Elena Portnaya / pianist Sunday evening at 6:30pm FREE and Open to the Public! 115 Main Plaza in the oldest cathedral in the nation Emanuel Borok, former Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra since 1985, has had a distinguished career as a soloist, chamber musician, and orchestral leader. Before coming to Dallas, Mr. Borok served for 11 seasons as Associate Concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Concertmaster of the Boston Pops Orchestra. Born and trained in the Soviet Union, Mr. Borok received his master degree from Gnessin Music Academy in Moscow. Among his chamber music partners are Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Shlomo Mintz, Emanuel Ax, Yefim Bronfman, Joshua Bell, Sarah Chang and Paul Neubauer. Emanuel Borok was also featured in the Distinguished Artists Recital Series at the 92nd Street Y, in New York. Conservatory, and laureate of numerous international piano competitions. Elena has performed solo and in chamber ensembles in Russia, Poland, England, Portugal, Argentina, Italy, Switzerland and the United States. She became a Doctor of Musical Arts in 2009, when she completed her doctorate at the University of Texas at Austin. She loves to work with singers and has therefore worked as a rehearsal pianist for four seasons at the Butler Opera Center at UT Austin. During 2010 and 2011, she was one of the Houston Grand Opera Studio artists, working on the preparation of Madame Butterfly, Dead Man Walking and Ariadne auf Naxos, under the baton of the maestro Patrick Summers. Elena is a permanent collaborator with her husband, violinist Mark Cheikhet, and they are raising two little daughters together Right in the heart of downtown San Antonio This series was designed after the European model of free concerts in historic destinations like Venice, Florence, and Amsterdam. Our Sunday evening concerts entice listeners to explore the location of several buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places. San Fernando, the oldest cathedral in the U.S., abuts the Bexar County Courthouse and between them, a revitalized Main Plaza leads to the Riverwalk, a top Texas tourist destination. Concerts are produced at San Fernando Cathedral on select Sundays, featuring world-class classical musicians. All listeners are invited to meet the artists at the catered dessert reception following every concert. "Please Become A Member" musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr Sterling Abrigo standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2010 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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                • Musica Viva: Anya’s Musical Birthday Bash

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                  Musica Viva! Presents Anya’s Musical Birthday Bash Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 7 p.m. At the Home of Fernando and Norma Reyes Traditional / Zatin: Jarabe Tapatio (Mexican Hat Dance)    Sviridov: “Romance” from Pushkin's Snow Storm, arranged for two pianos Anatoly Zatin and Vlada Vassilieva Liszt: Grand Gallop Chromatique arranged for piano, six hands by Wolff G. Leidel Anatoly Zatin, Baya Kakouberi, VladaVassilieva Schubert -Liszt: Soirees de Vienne: Valse-Caprice Baya Kakouberi Brahms: Scherzo in C minor Manuel Ponce - Estrellita - "My little Star" Mark Cheikhet and Elena Portnaya Sergei Rachmaninoff - Polka de V.R. Elena Portnaya Lutoslawski: Variations on a Theme by Paganini Elena Portnaya and Alena Gorina Chopin: Impromptu op. 29 in A-flat major Alena Gorina Rossini, arranged by Gottschalk: Rossini’s William Tell Overture Alena Gorina and Michael Schneider Gottschalk: The Last Hope Michael Schneider S.Saens: Rondo Cappriccioso Claus-Dieter Ludwig: Happy Birthday Emanuel Borok and Elena Amirbekyan Finale for Six Pianists: Alena Gorina, Baya Kakouberi, Elena Portnaya, Michael Schneider, Vlada Vassilieva, Anatoly Zatin. SPONSORED BY: Dr. Robert Michaelson Musical Bridges Around the World was founded in 1998 by Artistic Director Dr. Anya Grokhovski (Concert Pianist) It is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization. "Please Become A Member" musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2011 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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                  • Musica Viva -12/11/10 ~ Nikolai Myaskovsky ~ Cello Sonata No. 2, Mov. 1 ~ WarnerNuzova: Warner, cello & Nuzova, piano

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                    Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950) Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 81 Mov. 1 WarnerNuzova: Wendy Warner, cello & Irina Nuzova, piano Accomplished musicians in their own right, cellist Wendy Warner and pianist Irina Nuzova achieve a rare artistic synergy by melding their contrasting cultures and traditions. As homage to their respective backgrounds, the women favor Russian and American repertoire, exploring the commonalities and ‘dissonances’ between the two cultural heritages. Wendy Warner, has become one of the world’s leading cellists. Since she first garnered international attention by winning first-prize at the Fourth International Rostropovich Competition in Paris in 1990, audiences have watched Warner perform on prestigious stages. Her performances have received high acclaim from critics, including the Chicago Tribune who described her playing as “truly prodigious... persuasive of tone, beautifully shaped and graced with an altogether professional sheen.” Moscow-born pianist Irina Nuzova studied at Juilliard following rigorous education in Russia. Nuzova has appeared in Europe, the United States and South America, and has won top prizes in several international competitions. Well known for her captivating solo and chamber music performances, Nuzova has been hailed by critics as a musician who “...rises above mere virtuosity” (Washington Post) in her thoughtful rendition of the classical repertoire. As soloist and chamber music partner she distinguishes herself for her “intensity of feeling” (La Nazione, Florence, Italy) and “profound interpretation” (Strad, London). After performing together for several years, Nuzova and Warner formally came together as the WarnerNuzova cello and piano duo in 2008. Their mission is to perform and record the canonical works for cello and piano from the past and present, as well as commissioning unique arrangements and new music. Equal prominence of the instruments is a key consideration in the musicians’ choice of repertoire. Musical Bridges Around The World: Musica Viva chamber music as it should be heard occasional Saturday evenings Among the 4 unique types of musical experiences MBAW produces, our Musica Viva series showcases musicians from our Main Stage series in intimate, salon-style performances. One of MBAW’s founding members, Dr. Gustavo Medellin, underwrites these evenings because he appreciates the way close proximity of small audiences to exceptional artistic voices playing period instruments can create transcendent musical experiences for everyone involved. Musica Viva evenings, now offered to donors by invitation, were MBAW’s first productions when the group was founded in 1998. Focused on music by small ensembles, these concerts are designed to be performed “in chambers” in private residences, just as the classical composers of the chosen pieces had originally intended. Initially, a small but avid group of local music lovers supported these events. Since then, these evenings have evolved into meetings where performers and participants mingle over meals of specially-paired wines and foods following each intimate musical presentation. "Please Become A Member" http://www.musicalbridges.org http://www.facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 http://www.musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2010 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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                    • Aram Khachaturian (1903 - 1978) “Song-Poem” Mark Cheiket, violin & Irina Nuzova, piano

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                      Aram Khachaturian (1903 - 1978) “Song-Poem” Mark Cheiket, violin & Irina Nuzova, piano. Mark Cheikhet, Violinist, was born in 1973 into a family of two professional violinists. Mark began his music education at the age of 5 in a school for gifted children in Moscow, Russia. By the end of his schooling, he had become the concertmaster of its orchestra. In 1991, Mark was offered a full scholarship to attend Southern Methodist University in Dallas TX, where he became the concertmaster of the University’s Orchestra and studied with Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony, Emanuel Borok. He was invited, with a full scholarship, to study at the University of Southern California with Ellis Shoenfeld. While in Los Angeles, Mark founded and was first violinist in the “International String Quartet,” which became well known for imaginative interpretations of new works by modern composers in the Los Angeles area. In 1995, Mark chose to study in the Moscow Conservatory where he became the orchestra concertmaster. His teachers were Professors Maya Glezarova, Eward Grach and Sergei Girshenko. At the same time, Mark took classes from Spivakov, Oistrakh and Dihterev. Mark graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 2000. Mark has performed as a soloist and chamber musician throughout Russia, Germany, France, Mexico and the USA. Among his recent performances are: Festival in Bressia Italy, Festival of the Russian Art in Marseille, and Festival “Oldenburg Promenade” in Germany. In 2008 he performed for the Russian National Musical Project “Generation of the Stars.” Recently Mark has performed more often in Russia with symphony orchestras such as the Vladimir County Orchestra, Orchestra of Kavkas Philharmonick, and others. His remarkable sensitivity has earned him such prestigious collaborators as Denis Mazuev, Valery Grohovski, Boris Andrianov, Oleg Ogrinchuk, Methew Hinsley, Daniel Alberty, Michelle Burdoncle and Elena Nogaeva. In addition to his classical career, Mark has performed many jazz concerts of his own compositions. Mark plays frequently with his wife, Elena Portnaya, Russian pianist and winner of numerous international competitions. Irina Nuzova "rises above mere virtuosity" (Washington Post) in her thoughtful rendition of the classical repertoire both as a soloist and as chamber music partner. Ms. Nuzova has performed in the U.S. among others at the Phillips Collection in Washington DC, for Boston’s WBGH, the Kosciuszko Foundation in New York, the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert Series in Chicago, and at various venues overseas in Europe and South America. Her chamber ensemble appearances include the WarnerNuzoa duo, the acclaimed piano-cello duo with Wendy Warner; collaborations with Calefax, a reed quintet from the Netherlands; and regular performances in string ensembles. A CD will be released with works by Rachmaninov and other Russian romantics on the Cedille label in early 2010. Ms. Nuzova won top prizes as piano soloist and as chamber ensemble pianist in international competitions such as the Vincenzo Bellini and Citta di Senigallia International Competitions in Italy, the Bruce Hungerford Award at the Young Concert Artist Auditions in New York, the Beethoven Piano Sonata International Competition in Memphis, Tennessee., and at the Vittorio Gui and the Premio Trio di Trieste International Chamber Music Competitions in Italy. A native of Moscow, Ms. Nuzova made her debut with the Omsk Philharmonic at the age of 14 while attending the famous Gnessin School of Music. She received her education at Manhattan School of Music and the Juilliard School of Music, and has earned her Doctorate degree from the Hartt School of Music (University of Hartford) in Connecticut. December 12 2010 Sunday, 3:00 PM McAllister Auditorium, on the campus of San Antonio College, 1300 San Pedro San Antonio, Texas Musical Bridges Around the World was founded in 1998 by Artistic Director Dr. Anya Grokhovski (Concert Pianist) It is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization. "Please Become A Member" musicalbridges.org facebook.com/pages/Musical-Bridges-Around-the-World/150773101614415 musicalbridges.org/index.php/anyas-musings 210-464-1534 Mailing Address: 24165 IH-10 West, Suite 217-PMB 129, San Antonio, TX 78257 audio/video production James E. Sanders Jr standarddefinition.net Copyright © 2011 Musical Bridges Around the World. All Rights Reserved.

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