1. Observation of the thermal Casimir effect and new limits on non-Newtonian forces in the micrometer range

    01:09:08

    from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

    40 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Quantum theory predicts the existence of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies, a force arising from the zero-point energy of electromagnetic field modes around them. I will report the experimental observation of the thermal Casimir force between two gold plates, due to thermal rather than quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field at room-temperature. The thermal Casimir force dominates over the quantum force for separations greater than a micrometer. We use our measurements to place new upper bounds on short-range exotic forces, arising, for example, in quantum gravity theories with extra dimensions.

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    • Unveiling the Mystery of Mass

      01:32:01

      from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

      39 Plays / / 0 Comments

      One of the prime reasons the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built is to resolve the question of how particles acquire their mass. While it is very simple to measure particle masses and we have a model -- the Standard Model of Particle Physics -- which explains quite accurately all presently available measurements the seemingly trivial mechanism of how particle acquire their mass remains a mystery. The Standard Model invokes a new scalar gauge field to resolve this mystery but we have until recently not been able to find experimental evidence for its existence. On July 4, 2012, the CMS and ATLAS experiments have announced the discovery of a new Higgs-like particle at a mass of about 125 GeV. I will review our knowledge about the Higgs boson before the LHC started, discuss the discovery and the most recent updates from the LHC experiments.

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      • Spinors, Strings and Superconductors: Challenges of a new era in Condensed Matter Physics

        01:00:35

        from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

        39 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Dr. Piers Coleman Rutgers University Physics thrives on the strong convection of ideas between the lab and the cosmos, yet each new generation of physicist is surprised as it rediscovers the forgotten fact that discovery cuts across the boundaries of our specialities. Here, I shall argue that recent discoveries in particle, condensed matter and astronomy place us again at extraordinary juncture for a new convection of ideas. I shall try to sketch this pragmatic outlook from a condensed matter physics perspective, using examples drawn from my work and others. How some elegant equations from string theory and gravity led us to discover a novel phase transition in two dimensional Heisenberg magnets; how a discussion with a particle physicist suggested a new way of understanding heavy electron superconductors, and how the discovery of Ising electrons in the "hidden order" material, URu2Si2 suggests a form of order long thought to be forbidden - called "hastatic order".

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        • Colloquium: The Future of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

          01:07:01

          from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

          37 Plays / / 0 Comments

          I describe plans for the next-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey, to begin in July 2014, and which consists of three programs, APOGEE-2, MaNGA and eBOSS. APOGEE-2 will use both the Sloan Foundation Telescope at Apache Point and the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas to study Galactic archaeology with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy. MaNGA will develop fiber bundle technology for the BOSS spectrograph to perform multiplexed spatially resolved spectroscopy with an unprecedented combination of wavelength coverage and resolution for 10,000 nearby galaxies. eBOSS will study the Universe�s expansion using a massive survey of galaxies and quasars. eBOSS will also perform follow-up spectroscopy on X-ray and variable sources, making it both the largest and most broadly selected quasar survey. I will show how this innovative set of programs will lead to a better understanding of cosmology and galaxy formation, as well as stellar and exoplanetary astronomy. Speaker / Presenter: Michael Blanton, Dept of Physics, New York University

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          • Particle-wave duality with and without quantum spookiness.

            01:32:00

            from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

            37 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Quantum interference explains the stability of matter, guided the construction of the laser, and its application led to medical imaging techniques. So what is this quantum interference about? The double-slit experiments for electrons is considered to be “the only mystery”, insofar as it concerns quantum interference. Feynman's account of these experiments is one of the most popular. To get as close to Feynman's description of double-slit diffraction we did some experiments. This includes closing individual slits on demand, and taking a movie of the build-up of the diffraction pattern one particle at a time. In recent work done in Paris, macroscopic particle-wave duality with bouncing oil droplets was demonstrated for the first time ever. This was supposed not to be possible. What does that mean for microscopic or quantum-mechanical particle-wave duality for electrons? This means a lot to an international group of physicists labeled to be a “band of rebels” according to Morgan Freeman’s show “Through the Wormhole”. However this is not what we have taught in the past three years to more than 100,000 high school students through our movie “The Challenge of Quantum Reality.” What is going on?

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            • From Voids to Clusters: Gas and Galaxy Evolution in the Local Universe - 12 Oct. 2012

              01:32:01

              from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

              36 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies and their large scale structure has advanced enormously over the last decade, thanks to an impressive synergy between theoretical and observational efforts. While the growth of the dark matter component seems well understood, the physics of the gas, during its accretion, removal and/or depletion is less well understood. Increasingly large scale optical surveys are tracing out the cosmic web of filaments and voids. Mathematical tools have been developed to describe these structures and to identify galaxies located in specific environments. HI imaging surveys begin to answer the question: how do galaxies get and lose their gas? The best evidence for ongoing gas accretion is found in the lowest density environments, while removal of gas in the highest density environments stops star formation and reddens the galaxies. Speaker: Jacquiline van Gorkom, Columbia University

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              • From Voids to Clusters: Gas and Galaxy Evolution in the Local Universe

                01:32:01

                from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                35 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies and their large scale structure has advanced enormously over the last decade, thanks to an impressive synergy between theoretical and observational efforts. While the growth of the dark matter component seems well understood, the physics of the gas, during its accretion, removal and/or depletion is less well understood. Increasingly large scale optical surveys are tracing out the cosmic web of filaments and voids. Mathematical tools have been developed to describe these structures and to identify galaxies located in specific environments. HI imaging surveys begin to answer the question: how do galaxies get and lose their gas? The best evidence for ongoing gas accretion is found in the lowest density environments, while removal of gas in the highest density environments stops star formation and reddens the galaxies. Speaker: Jacquiline van Gorkom, Columbia University

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                • Peter Ouyang

                  26:26

                  from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                  35 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Peter Ouyang presenting at Great Lakes String 2013

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                  • LRSM 50th Anniversary Celebration: Andrea Liu

                    15:34

                    from Felice Macera / Added

                    34 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    On May 4, 2012, the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) celebrated its 50th Birthday with a memorable event that attracted over 220 attendees from around the world. The celebratory symposium and dinner combined historical recollections with the current research at the LRSM. In this video is: Andrea Liu, Physics and Astronomy

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                    • Joshua Lapan

                      32:23

                      from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                      33 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Joshua Lapan presenting at Great Lakes String 2013

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