1. Particle Fever #3

    02:57

    from Claudia Raschke / Added

    50 Plays / / 0 Comments

    For the first time, a film gives audiences a front row seat to a significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens. Particle Fever follows six brilliant scientists during the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, marking the start-up of the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet, pushing the edge of human innovation. Cosmological Constant - A parameter in Einstein’s theory of relativity which, when added, amounts to “vacuum energy”, or energy stored in space itself. It can cause the universe to expand at an accelerated rate — something which appears to be occurring today. The size of the cosmological constant is one of the biggest mysteries in theoretical physics. LHC - The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. It first started up on 10 September 2008, and is the largest ring (27 km) in CERN’s accelerator complex. It consists of superconducting magnets to guide the particles and accelerating structures to boost the energy of the particles along the way. The machine is being upgraded currently and will operate at even higher energies in early 2015. Higgs Boson - The Higgs boson or Higgs particle is an elementary particle initially theorized in 1964, and confirmed to exist on 14 March 2013. Its discovery completes the Standard Model, represents the first elementary particle seen without spin, and confirms the existence of the Higgs field. Higgs Field - The Higgs field fills all of space and, according to the Standard Model theory, was ‘switched on’ moments after the Big Bang, which caused most elementary particles (quarks, the electron, weak force carriers) to acquire mass. The electron mass allows atoms to form and thus the Higgs field is responsible for all normal matter as we know it.

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    • Particle Fever #2

      02:59

      from Claudia Raschke / Added

      35 Plays / / 0 Comments

      For the first time, a film gives audiences a front row seat to a significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens. Particle Fever follows six brilliant scientists during the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, marking the start-up of the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet, pushing the edge of human innovation. LHC - The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. It first started up on 10 September 2008, and is the largest ring (27 km) in CERN’s accelerator complex. It consists of superconducting magnets to guide the particles and accelerating structures to boost the energy of the particles along the way. The machine is being upgraded currently and will operate at even higher energies in early 2015. Proton - Protons are positively charged subatomic particles that, along with neutrons, make up the nucleus of an atom. Protons are the particles that are accelerated and collided at the LHC. Higgs Field - The Higgs field fills all of space and, according to the Standard Model theory, was ‘switched on’ moments after the Big Bang, which caused most elementary particles (quarks, the electron, weak force carriers) to acquire mass. The electron mass allows atoms to form and thus the Higgs field is responsible for all normal matter as we know it.

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      • Particle Fever #1

        02:42

        from Claudia Raschke / Added

        35 Plays / / 0 Comments

        For the first time, a film gives audiences a front row seat to a significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens. Particle Fever follows six brilliant scientists during the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, marking the start-up of the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet, pushing the edge of human innovation. Multiverse - The multiverse is a theoretical description of spacetime in which our known universe is a small part of something much more vast in which the laws of nature might vary from place to place. The multiverse, while potentially a natural consequence of string theory and cosmic inflation, is not yet well-defined and by some is considered controversial. Supersymmetry - Supersymmetry is a special type of symmetry in physics which implies that there is a correspondence, at a fundamental level, between fermions and bosons (roughly particles which make up matter and particles responsible for forces). If supersymmetry were true, each Standard Model particle would have a corresponding ‘superpartner’, potentially discoverable at the LHC. Standard Model - The Standard Model is the current theory of elementary particles. It is literally a list of particles and their interactions which abide by the laws of quantum mechanics and relativity and describe nearly all known physical phenomena in our Universe at the microscopic level. Dark Matter - In astronomy and cosmology, dark matter is a type of matter hypothesized to account for a large part of the total mass in the universe. Evidence strongly suggests it isn’t ordinary matter – i.e., it is not made of atoms. A great hope for the LHC is that it will discover a new particle that could explain dark matter.

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        • The QM and Cosmology Landscape 1992 to 1997

          48:18

          from Walter D. Falk / Added

          Eleventh documentary in the series of Psychic Landscape series.

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          • The Standard Model - HD 1080p

            01:21

            from Conor Hearn / Added

            41 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Introduction to my series and the Standard Model of Physics.

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            • All of Physics, Part 1: Introduction

              50:15

              from Nick Bailey / Added

              435 Plays / / 0 Comments

              First part of the series "All of Physics" delivered by John Williamson at The University of Glasgow. Covers Scientific Method and The Standard Model, and a bit of quantum mechanics.

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              • Update from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

                01:00:03

                from Science for the Public / Added

                59 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Science for the Public, September 11, 2012. Steven Nahn, Associate Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Finding the Higgs —or Higgs-ish— is one of the greatest triumphs in the history of science. This particle is the source of mass that makes possible the existence of our familiar form of matter. Professor Steven Nahn explains what the Higgs boson is and why it is so important for a model of the structure of matter. He also describes the enormous challenge of finding the Higgs —even with the power of the Large Hadron Collider— and the extreme requirements of scientific verification for this elusive particle. Dr. Nahn is involved in one of the major projects at the LHC, the Compact Muon Solenoid.

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                • Higgs Boson or "The God Particle" The last piece of the Standard Model "Discussed - Part 1 HD

                  13:01

                  from Salar Golestanian / Added

                  141 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  In episode 03 we are discussing the possible sighting at the famous Higgs Boson that is also sometimes called the God Particle. In this part 1 we analyse the recent annoucement at CERN that, at least, a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson had been found. I want to highlight that the physicists at CERN weren't using microscopes or similar tools to view the Higgs boson directly; they were looking at the energy signatures of other particles created. CERN researchers used those signatures, along with particle physics Standard theory, to claim the discovery of the Higgs boson. In Physics we mostly rely on two approaches in describing the world we live in We either build bigger and better space telescopes here on earth or in space like Hubble so we can look at the distant galaxies and check out the stars and quasars in in various stage of their life or perhaps to look really far to study the edge of the universe that is visible to our tools here on earth. We also go on and build bigger and more energetic particle accelerators to study the sub atomic - the elementary particles and the forces that hold them together in the hope to work out what is holding the universe together. In all this we have to make some basic fundamental assumptions to allow us to build the physics we need to describe our world. Here is just couple of those basic assumptions: Firstly Our ruler that measures distance in space or the clock that measures time- does so from our reference frame here on earth - so it is the same measuring tool today here now today - as well as billions of years in the past - and therefore we assume that for example the speed of light is a constant and it is the same now as it was near the big bang some 13 billion years ago. We also apply the same measuring tools in the sub atomic world -- to explain it better, let us imagine that we are microscopic & small enough to stand on the surface of the nucleus of the atom or one of the sub atomic particles -- then the proposition is that we would be still measuring the space and time using the same ruler and clock here on earth and not the smaller microscopic one on the surface of the subatomic world. So for example IMHO time may be running a lot faster close to the nucleus of atom than here on surface of earth - but since we cannot measure or even comprehend the scale - we stick with the SI standards set here on earth The Last Week Announcement at CERN is by no means the end of this chapter - the physicist Stephen Hawking once made a $100 bet claiming that the Higgs boson was fiction. A lot of physicists still think so mainly because a lot more data is needed to back up this discovery - for example we need to prove that this Higgs boson is not spinning otherwise it is just like any other particle with mass - this is not going to be easy - Furthermore even if we do find more data to prove all this, so that all the jigsaw parts of the Standard Model Theory is elegantly put together, it still is not explain gravity. To finish this episode we will have look at a great animation that explains The Standard Model and Higgs Boson a lot better than I can ever do and in the second part of this series I will go how we got here with a finer tooth comb - Also watch animation explaining "Higgs" easy way as well as Dr P Higgs himself appearance about the discovery. Credits, videos and Images used in the video: zeitgistminds - www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4TO1iLZmcw Atom Visualization by Chaîne de orishimak - www.youtube.com/user/orishimak Hubble Space-Shattering Discoveries by SpaceRip - http://hubblesite.org/gallery/ Search for the Higgs The Atlase Experiment - http://public.web.cern.ch/public/ Standard Model- Quarks - www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxQwkdu9WbE What Caused the Big Bang? by tdarnell - www.youtube.com/watch?v=uabNtlLfYyU 3D Artist - www.youtube.com/user/AlienScientistFan/videos Good Old Daze - www.youtube.com/user/goodolddaze/videos Minute Physics animation - The Higgs Boson Part 1 / Part 2 Higgs Boson explained the easy way! by jplorre Web: http://salaro.com Product: http://dotnetnuke.co.uk Blog: http://salargolestanian.com SciFi: http://scifiwood.com About Salar: Salar's main business is at salaro.com & with team of 12, builds maintains software solutions based on Microsoft .net for both CMS and Ecommerce Platforms, DotnetNuke and nopCommerce. Forthe latest news you can visit the respective sites above. Salar's early academic years was doing Physics so he has a good understanding of the Science & Technology in particular Physics & Mathematics. The web world today, moves and progresses swiftly, so I hope to keep a continuous flow of work related information and ideas in my subsequent blogs or Salaro TV

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                  • What is a Higgs boson?

                    01:53

                    from Flikli / Added

                    287 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    The Higgs boson was all over the news in early July 2012 when physicists announced that it had been found. But what is a Higgs boson? Here’s a basic overview!

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                    • The Standard Model

                      02:53

                      from Wouter Deconinck / Added

                      4 Plays / / 0 Comments

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