1. Anamorphic Projection 1 (take2)

    00:17

    from Nikita Troufanov / Added

    Anamorphic Projection 1 deals with robots as image machines. A 2-d figure was designed as a composition of 4 planes that could only be viewed from one specific vantage point, much like the sidewalk chalk drawings. The 4 planes were ‘drawn’ in physical space by 4 robot arms with LED rod attachments and long exposure photography. A camera was attached to a 5th robot arm and programmed on a motion path that moved off the vantage point, deconstructing the figure and revealing it’s real geometry in 3-d space.

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    • Anisotropic Formations

      01:45

      from Salvador Cortez / Added

      139 Plays / / 0 Comments

      SCI-Arc 13FA_Testa ESTm Vertical Studio Team: Salvador Cortez / Cheng Lu / Avra Tomara / Nikita Troufanov Instructor: Peter Testa
 Robot Lab Coordinator: Jake Newsum an· i· so· tro· py : the property of being directionally dependent, as opposed to isotropy, which implies identical properties in all directions. Anisotropic Formations is a proto-architectural exploration of anisotropic aesthetics and structures through vector based 3d printing. Taking inspiration from 3d printed fashion, composite sail manufacturing and experimental application of 6-axis robotics, the project takes the anisotropic approach as both an aesthetic and a fabrication logic. Anisotropic geometry is vector-based and is directionally dependent. Combinations of these vectors result in rich surface and 3d qualities of varied densities, hierarchies and multi-directional layering. There was an imperative to pursue this design research in a post-digital platform, stepping out from the Euclidean flatness of the computer screen onto the non-Euclidean platform of the physical. Plastic extrusion provided direct access to vector geometry in physical space, enriching it with material agency. Flexibility of the scaffold allowed for multiple configurations and other possibilities. The project was realized through a series of iterations that subjected the design agenda to a series of different machining workspaces and digital-to-physical workflows. From Cartesian workspace of a conventional 3d printer to spherical workspace of multi-axis collaborative robotics and from vector based workflows of 3d modeling to motion based work flows of animation.

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      • Anisotropic Formations

        02:05

        from Nikita Troufanov / Added

        an· i· so· tro· py : the property of being directionally dependent, as opposed to isotropy, which implies identical properties in all directions. Anisotropic Formations project is a proto-architectural project that mixes robotics with vector-based 3-D printing. Taking inspiration from 3-D printed fashion, composite sail manufacturing and experimental application of industrial robotics, the project takes the anisotropic approach as both an aesthetic and a fabrication logic. There was also an interest in precise processes and imprecise results that would be allowed to occur due to material behaviors. Plastic extrusion was done in 3d space, forming fibrous geometries with extruded lines of plastic—as opposed to 2-dimensional layers. A flexible scaffold/mandrel was developed to serve as support structure for plastic extrusion paths. A custom extruder tool was built for depositing Polycaprolactone plastic (a low temperature reformable polymer). The first layer of extruded pattern would become a meta-scaffold that would be further transformed by the robot arms and extruded over with another pattern. Vector patterns were not 3-D modeled in a conventional sense but were generated from numeric programming of robot joint coordinates and rotation sequences. The goal was not to faithfully fabricate a predetermined digital geometry but rather to “prototype” geometry in physical space using machine procedures and material properties as generative agents. Starting from a point of total control (precise extrusion of a diagrid) we proceeded to tweak speeds, rotation sequences and temperatures to tease out new and unexpected results from the material. The result was a series of objects that demonstrated levels of control and also material agency. Anisotropic Formations_SCI-Arc 13FA_Testa ESTm Vertical Studio Team: Salvador Cortez / Cheng Lu / Avra Tomara / Nikita Troufanov Instructor: Peter Testa
 Robot Lab Coordinator: Jake Newsum

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        • AnIsotropic Formations Extended

          01:57

          from Salvador Cortez / Added

          97 Plays / / 0 Comments

          SCI-Arc 13FA_Testa ESTm Vertical Studio Team: Salvador Cortez / Cheng Lu / Avra Tomara / Nikita Troufanov Instructor: Peter Testa
 Robot Lab Coordinator: Jake Newsum an· i· so· tro· py : the property of being directionally dependent, as opposed to isotropy, which implies identical properties in all directions. Anisotropic Formations is a proto-architectural exploration of anisotropic aesthetics and structures through vector based 3d printing. Taking inspiration from 3d printed fashion, composite sail manufacturing and experimental application of 6-axis robotics, the project takes the anisotropic approach as both an aesthetic and a fabrication logic. Anisotropic geometry is vector-based and is directionally dependent. Combinations of these vectors result in rich surface and 3d qualities of varied densities, hierarchies and multi-directional layering. There was an imperative to pursue this design research in a post-digital platform, stepping out from the Euclidean flatness of the computer screen onto the non-Euclidean platform of the physical. Plastic extrusion provided direct access to vector geometry in physical space, enriching it with material agency. Flexibility of the scaffold allowed for multiple configurations and other possibilities. The project was realized through a series of iterations that subjected the design agenda to a series of different machining workspaces and digital-to-physical workflows. From Cartesian workspace of a conventional 3d printer to spherical workspace of multi-axis collaborative robotics and from vector based workflows of 3d modeling to motion based work flows of animation.

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          • AUTO demo

            01:04

            from Uriel Alexander Lopez / Added

            41 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Uriel Alexander Lopez Thesis Research 2014 SCIARC http://www.playspacegrnd.com/ A short video teaser. A couple of tests in the lab produced some funny stuff worth sharing.

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            • Automorphic Translations

              02:56

              from Kyle Branchesi / Added

              128 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Fall 2013, Staubli Robotics Lab, Southern California Institute of Architecture Students: Kyle_Branchesi Daniel_Caven David_Kim Uriel_Lopez

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              • A Video

                02:23

                from Erin Besler / Added

                188 Plays / / 1 Comment

                Team: Erin Besler, Siim Tuksam, Peter A Vikar, Euguene Kosgoron www.erinbesler.com www.petervikar.com Professor: Peter Testa with Brandon Kruysman Jonathan Proto http://www.kruysman-proto.com/ and Jonathon Stahl http://www.compmatter-ta.com/ Testa XLab Real Time Fall 2011 SCI-Arc SRSL Los Angeles, CA Music - Tron: Legacy "Outlands"

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                • A Video

                  03:00

                  from Erin Besler / Added

                  435 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  www.erinbesler.com in collaboration with Siim Tuksam, Peter Vikar and Eugene Kosgoron Video Edited and Compiled by Siim Tuksam Professor: Peter Testa with Jonathan Proto and Brandon Kruysman www.kruysman-proto.com Music - Tinman "Ice Blue Eyes" This video was produced as part of studio work at The Southern California Institute of Architecture www.sciarc.edu

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                  • Buoyant Depositions

                    01:53

                    from BrianHarms / Added

                    3,601 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    This project aims to explore the repeatability of the creation of inexact forms through exact machinic operations, with the intention of achieving a certain degree of control over entropic processes. These processes involve the articulated deposition of liquid wax into cool water, taking advantage of the wax’s buoyancy, rapid phase change, and ability to fuse and bond to itself and other materials. Buoyancy plays a key role in the generation of these complex wax forms. Wax can be deposited such that it rises and pools, creating column structures and datums, or floor plates. By raising or lowering water levels while pools of hot wax float on the water’s surface, organic caves and coves are created within the structural network. This project also aims to project these processes onto an architectural scale whereby autonomous machines may be deployed on site and organically shape buoyant, hardening liquids through their flotation. Instructions would be encoded and sent to robots, and the operation would be overseen by humans, who could make adjustments and corrections in real time. This idea poses the following questions: What happens when architects, who rely heavily on their ability to reify an anticipated form, embraces inexact processes of construction? What is the role of the drawing when the form cannot be fully anticipated? What new form would construction documents take? Or would they become antiquated? Brian Harms, Nicholas Barger instructor: Marcelyn Gow Sci-arc Spring 2013

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