When: Monday, April 28, 2008 – 2:00 PM
Where: Evelyn Smith Music Theatre, Arizona State University, Tempe Campus

Five Principles for Making Conscientious Food Choices

Transparency: We have the right to know how our food is produced.
Fairness: Producing food should not impose costs on others.
Humanity: Inflicting unnecessary suffering on animals is wrong.
Social Responsibility: Workers are entitled to decent wages and working conditions.
Needs: Preserving life and health justifies more than other desires.

Peter Singer

IRA W. DECAMP PROFESSOR OF BIOETHICS, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
LAUREATE PROFESSOR, AT THE CENTRE FOR APPLIED PHILOSOPHY AND PUBLIC ETHICS UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

About the Dr. Singer:

Peter Albert David Singer was born in Melbourne, Australia on July 6, 1946. He received his B.A. (Hons) from the University of Melbourne, 1967; M.A. also from the University of Melbourne, 1969 and B. Phil., University of Oxford, 1971. Singer specializes in practical ethics, approaching ethical issues mostly from a preference utilitarian perspective. Dr. Singer supports and is actively involved in several humanitarian organizations worldwide, including Oxfam, an organization that works directly with local grass roots organizations in developing countries, and supervises the way its money is used to prevent corruption and waste. He is also the President of Animals Rights International and Chair in the Board of Directors of The Great Ape Project. has published over twenty books, including: Practical Ethics (1979), Animal Liberation (1975), One World: Ethics and Globalization (2002), The President of Good and Evil: The Ethics of George W. Bush (2004), How Ethical is Australia? An Examination of Australia’s Record as a Global Citizen (2004) and The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter (2006).

Singer has been called “the world’s most influential living philosopher,” by The New Yorker and Time Magazine listed him in “The Time 100,” their annual listing of the world’s 100 most influential people. Five Principles for Making Conscientious Food Choices Transparency: We have the right to know how our food is produced. Fairness: Producing food should not impose costs on others. Humanity: Inflicting unnecessary suffering on animals is wrong. Social Responsibility: Workers are entitled to decent wages and working conditions. Needs: Preserving life and health justifies more than other desires.

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