While there are various representations of women in labour, these tend to focus attention on the event of the child’s birth, not the woman’s birthing process, often objectifying her in favour of the subjectivity of the newborn. "Lilla’s Birthing" seeks to redress this, re-establishing the birthing woman as empowered within her own labouring, not victim of it. Through a normalised woman centred portrayal of birthing, the widespread misrepresentation of labouring women and their bodies is undermined. The camera remains as closely as possible with the woman, the edit favours the process over the event (the birth itself occupies seconds out of the 60 minutes of the film’s length), the humour, mundanity, excitement, joy, boredom and the pain intermingle, the cyclical rhythm of the contractions set the pace. "Lilla's Birthing" is usually exhibited with "Portrait of a Labour", a book work which works with and against the film. The intimacy of the book format allows the viewer to examine that which the film denies, the expression, the identity, the representations of her which the film references (you see these shots being taken) but refuses.

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