The light was first exhibited on 4th June 1815 and in foggy weather a bell was tolled every half minute. The tower was and still is painted white.

Two serious mishaps occurred during the construction of the tower, one on the night of 18th October 1812 when 10 out of 24 workmen were swept off the rock and drowned during a violent storm. The second was on 22nd August 1814 when a stone cutter fell 72 feet (22m) to his death.
During wartime small rocks like Tuskar were very vulnerable to drifting mines which had parted from their moorings. One of these mines exploded when it struck the rock on 2nd December 1941 injuring two assistant keepers, W. J. Cahill and P. Scanlan. Both were brought ashore by the Rosslare lifeboat but unfortunately Patrick Scalan died in hospital the next day.

Reliefs of rocks and islands by helicopter started in October 1969, at that time Tuskar was not on the list but by 1972 a 10m diameter concrete pad had been built on the rock in readiness for the reliefs which commenced on 30th January 1975 and are carried out from Ballygillane near Rosslare Harbour.

On 31st March 1993 the lighthouse was converted to automatic operation and the keepers were withdrawn from the station. The station is in the care of an Attendant and Assistant Attendant and the aids to navigation are also monitored via a telemetry link from Irish Lights Dun Laoghaire.

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