This piece is the opening tune from the CD called "Some Sort of Angel" (also the band name) a recording of eight pieces each with its own distinct character. My music in most genres I am drawn to compose with today, is best described as "pancultural" a term coined by composer, pianist and guitarist Tom Manoff of NPR's "All Songs Considered." Originally used for a new movement in classical composition starting in the 1970's with influence from jazz composers as far back as Duke Ellington, European composers like Debussy and Bartok, and composers today like Arvo Part, Jan Garbarek, Maria Schneider, Joni Mitchell, Anouar Brahem, Phillip Glass, and others worldwide, it signifies a return to strong melody and a widening of a composer's musical palette to include the use of colors from any culture past and present without necessarily imitating those cultures. In this sense all cultures are considered equal, without bias, prejudicial judgement, or some false idea of hierarchical development. With this open view of the planet, any and all kinds of material which can be used in making a musical statement can be drawn into a composer's art. When done successfully a listener may experience a sense of some particular culture or even more than one in a single piece of music, but without being really any of them, and in practice it is not the composer's intent to purposely imitate any particular music but instead draw on other musics for their unique character because a composer's home turf and musical background may not have the tonal colors needed to make a more complete artistic and emotional expression. Reaching out and into other ways of making music becomes a natural way to find the sounds that feel right and work musically. This is very different from today's commercial labeling of much music called 'world music' or 'multi-cultura"l. In pancultural writing, the making of music is felt to be much like a painter who may present us with something that may seem familiar but is not that at all, but more. The music is not overly representative or literal, nor is it a forcing together of disparate sounds like a collage. It is something else, and allows the listener a more open experience of pure music without being purposely led into a particular style. The composer can be as literal as they need or want to be in a piece of music, then in the next not be defined at all by any particular sounds. This concept allows for the making of a true world music, a world art, because the way in which the music is created will be very different for a composer in Tunisia than it would be for another in Japan, or Brazil, North America, Spain, or India. Yet they all draw from the same world palette. Pancultural music allows true freedom of expression but requires study, research, and serious listening, so an honest music can be created. It is challenging, but the artistic and spiritual rewards for the artist and listener are deeply fulfilling. I hope this helps, and if you are interested, it is worth researching a bit...then listening. With this awareness, I present my music here and the other music on this CD. The title of the piece is in Hindi and translates ("loosely' as Asian and Western languages have many translation problems) into English as "It is Never Too Late." The melody is written from a hybrid scale both Persian and North Indian, but is also found in other Middle Eastern, North African, and Flamenco cultures. The band are a group of highly skilled and creative musicians, and good friends: Gary Gordon - soprano & alto sax/flute; Mark Van Gulden - vibraphone & percussion; Jamie Masefield - mandolin & tenor banjo; Clyde Stats - acoustic bass; Myself - nylon & steel string acoustic guitars/composer. I hope you enjoy my offering.

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