By talking with Pamela Anderson today, one would never guess she beat the odds and overcame a debilitating disease at the age of four. "It was a struggle," the former patient from The Children's Center said. "Just getting up everyday was a struggle. I truly believe that without this Center I wouldn't have survived," Pamela described as she strolled down the halls of the Donald W. Reynolds Complex. Pamela was diagnosed with polio in 1966. Her mother, along with her caregivers, taught Pamela how to survive and thrive with her disability. "They didn't let you sit back on your rear end and say 'I can't do that,'" Anderson said. "You can at least put forth an effort to do it. They showed me how to walk, whether it was freely or with the aid of crutches."

Pamela also recalled fond memories during her time at The Children's Center. The staff kept her and the other patients busy with arts and crafts, swimming, and holiday celebrations. "On the Fourth of July, they would have the fireworks outside. The kids who were able to go outside could go and enjoy the fireworks, so that was really neat," she said. Pamela's stay lasted two years, and then she returned home to her family in Chandler, Oklahoma. Today, Pamela has a successful career at the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, and has a daughter of her own. "By coming here today, I wanted to give back. I'm hoping that this is just the first step of giving back to The Children's Center."

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