A young woman, living alone in Manhattan, tries to find a way out of her solitude through connections in the strange new world of the online network. Through this simple departure point complex issues emerge: What is it to be alone? What is it being one’s self? What is it to be a woman today? What is it to be real, to be naked, with another — who is only on screen? Raimonda Skeryte in a beautiful and understated performance explores these questions by becoming a mirror for seeing our own sexuality, our boredom, and global interconnected loneliness. From encounters with Yakuza gangsters to international sex workers and through Skeryte’s own sexual awakening the work gives visibility to how images of our selves are created in our digital society. It is simultaneously an exploration of what it means to make — and watch — film today; what it means to inhabit a system that is always recording, where identity is always and already enmeshed in the web of becoming.

REVIEWS / ESSAYS
'If net living were a movie, this would be it. Lafia knows what you do and what you want to do, as well as how you feel about it. Crazy good. And restrained, even!'
Douglas Rushkoff, author, media theorist, Program or Be Programmed

'The concept is completely relevant, our global interconnected loneliness.'
Jean Christian Bourcart, artist

'Poignant and beautiful. A profound loneliness permeates the film. Raimonda Skeryte has a radiant presence, dare I say as deep and captivating as Renée Jeanne Falconetti in The Passion of Joan of Arc.'
Lizzie Gottlieb film director, Today's Man

'A new way to think film and cinema as a kind of networked publics. Great and innovative project that lets us see the very wired forms of social relationships that are hard to describe. A great movie. That females will often get social feedback and get hooked in these new services, as this women in your movie is precise and accurate. The movie describes this feeling of loneliness, and hope of social acceptance extraordinarily well.'
Petter.B.Brandtzag, social media theorist

'Powerful and intimate. This is a network life. In her solitude, she remains connected — however ethereally, however precariously — to the world around her. Only the world around her is more often than not a telepresence. As users of Chatroulette discover, once the meta-narrative of identity disappears — once we stop naming ourselves, stop declaring our social status, our taste, our social tethers such as work and education — we discover something else. Within the presumed mediation of the screen, we discover the immediacy of the encounter.'
Daniel Coffeen, social philosopher

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