Filmmaker Caio Simbula's short experimental documentary, Twaneeya Ware: The Last of the Zayantes, is a meditative study about an obscure and problematic piece of Santa Cruz local history. Through the use of reenactment and repetition, a local tale purported of being an accurate history is called into question, resulting in many more questions than answers. In addition to questioning historical accuracy, the film also touches on the subject of representation and race relations between the California Indians, Missionaries, and White settlers of Northern California from the Mission era to the present. Filmed in the lush forests of the Henry Cowell State Park and the stark structures of Mission Santa Cruz, the mix of 16mm black and white film, archival footage from the National Archives, and high definition footage shot with a 35mm adapter, along with a soundtrack that combines D.W. Griffith's The Mended Lute with the unnerving sounds of the infamous industrial music band, Throbbing Gristle, the film immerses the viewer in a dreamlike experience that derails the memory and history proposed by the original legend of the Zayantes.

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