Here's a virtual movie of the great Rupert brooke reading his sonnet to the dead of World War One "The Dead" This sonnet is a tribute to those British soldiers who died serving their country in the First World War. Brooke declares that the dead men have made the deepest sacrifice possible; but in return they have ennobled themselves and brought honour back to Britain.

STRUCTURE: A sonnet. This is a Plutarchan sonnet: note the ABBA CDDC pattern in the octet. Also note the difference in the sextet to Peace (p.162).

'The Dead': this poem expresses a sense of deep reverence for the sacrifice of those who have died in the war.

"Blow out, you bugles": a bugle is a simple trumpet used in military funerals— in the British Empire, 'The Last Post' was played over the bodies of the dead. Note the assonance, here, that runs throughout the poem-- perhaps here reminiscent of the bugles themselves.

"rich Dead!": the highly valued dead are repeatedly referred to through metaphors of earned wealth. The opening line is a passionate call to memorialize the dead soldiers.

"None of these so lonely and poor... made us rarer gifts than gold": Even the poorest man has, by dying for his country, given a gift more precious than gold. This paradox continues the metaphorical equation of death at war to the passing on of wealth— freely given to the people of Britain (note Brooke writes of "us"; he speaks for the nation). The line also recalls Shakespeare's Henry V: "For he to-day that sheds his blood with me / Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, / This day shall gentle his condition" (Act IV, scene iii). The sacrifice of death gives nobility to the poorest.

"These laid the world away": the world is willingly laid aside.

"poured out the red / Sweet wine of youth": in death, youth is used up, like wine decanted from a glass.

"gave up the years to be...": the dead men's sacrifice is vividly drawn out by Brooke as he speculatively imagines their years of "work and joy" lost; as is their "serene" time, or peaceful time, of old age. He even conjectures that the men have given up their "immortality" by not having "sons", whom also "they gave".

"Blow, bugles, blow!": the repetition at the beginning of the sextet emphasises the message of remembrance that the poem insists upon.

"They brought us...Holiness...Love and Pain...": Brooke again insists that, to a place of "dearth"— 'lack' or famine— the soldiers bring back the personified characters of Holiness, Love and Pain. The soldiers in fact redeem the fallen world, like Christ.

"Honour has come back, as king, to earth": the personification continues, here with Christ-like connotations: also a suggestion of the medieval myth of 'the return of the king'— which brings restoration and new life to the land.

"...paid his subjects with a royal wage": the metaphor of wealth given or paid to others continues. The soldier's personal sacrifice and 'gift' has now become a greater gift to a nation, personified in the figure of the king, Honour, ruling over the land.

"Nobleness walks in our ways again": The sextet, with its evocation of knightly chivalry, develops the Shakespearian notion of new-found nobility and a 'gentled condition' ruling over the land, after the willing sacrifice of men's lives. If the Octet is concerned with the soldier's loss, the sextet is concerned with what others have gained by their death.

"we have come into our heritage": the people of Britain have inherited a different and ennobled country, full of virtue— thanks to the soldier's sacrifice. This closing image collapses together the two metaphorical strands in the poem— of wealth and nobility— in the suggestion of children receiving their inheritance or land from their dead father.

Kind Regards

Jim Clark
All rights are reserved on this video recording copyright Jim Clark 2013

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