CLARIN - Geleerdenbrieven

The scientific revolution of the 17th century was driven by countless discoveries in the observatory, at sea, in the library, in the workshop and in society at large. The Netherlands, in those days an assembly of European thinkers and intellectuals, were also a hub of ideas and scientific transfer. But how were new elements of knowledge picked up, processed, disseminated and – ultimately – accepted in broad circles of the educated community?

To meet this research question researchers are building a multidisciplinary collaboratory to analyze a machine-readable and growing corpus of letters of scholars who lived in the 17th-century Dutch Republic. Until the publication of the first scientific journals in the 1660s, letters were by far the most direct and important means of communication between intellectuals.

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