Who knew Russia and Belarus, despite being different countries, shared domestic airspace? (This was one of the first cocky comments Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport workers came out with...'Heard of google?'). So in September 2012 my colleague and I spent a night in the transit zone under the cloud of being deported back to Paris in the morning. We were looking for three things: a cash machine (to pay the 'bribe', hey did you know, Russian for ATM is 'bankomat'? ' Izvinite, gde zdes' bankomat?'), a photo booth (for a new passport picture for a new visa), and a working laptop and internet connection (to buy a new flight to Minsk in the morning). It was a long night. Especially since the elderly, skinny fellow who was helping us, who told us he had spent the past 14 years working at this airport, couldn't be found with our passports under his ransom in the early hours of the next morning. How we scoured Terminals D, E and F.

June 2013. Sheremetyevo is packed with journalists and Russian agents in plain clothes. They're looking for American whistleblower Edward Snowden, who has been at the airport since 23 June 2013 - he has no travel documents since he played a major role in revealing NSA (US national security agency) secrets about surveillance and security breaches. Edward Snowden is less than two months younger than I am and is a former CIA employee. This could be Snowden's out of sight room at the airport, says Spanish newspaper El Mundo: elmundo.es/elmundo/2013/06/26/internacional/1372256401.html

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