In this excerpt of Michael Wolf's talk at Aperture, he describes his aesthetic of photographing architecture in both Hong Kong and Chicago. By not including the sky in his images of buildings, the scale becomes much more ambiguous and the images have a more awe-inspiring feel to them. Wolf talks further about how the images work both as a graphic abstract depiction of the buildings and an incredibly detailed portrait of them depending on the distance you view them from. Taking these ideas of scale, he also speaks about his decision to digitally enlarge the minute details of the buildings, creating pixelated portraits of the inhabitants inside these buildings.

Coinciding with the exhibition at Aperture Gallery and the release of its accompanying monograph, The Transparent City, Michael Wolf gave a talk on November 10, 2009. His large-scale color photographs of downtown Chicago’s buildings and their inhabitants examine public versus private space in the context of 21st-century urban life.

You can watch the entire panel discussion divided in three different clips on our multimedia page and vimeo account.

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