A non-scientific test of the video features on the new Canon 70D, part of which was compared to the older Nikon D 7000.

First I tested the touch screen. I went to OTEC and set up the tripod with foreground and background subjects. I used the 55-250 at 250. Although the picture-in-picture part is not of the actual test (both videos were shot during the same several minute test, but they are not synchronized) they do represent what actually happened (I did not manually focus the camera at all during all of today's testing), which was very accurate video focus just by touching the area on the screen that I wanted the lens to focus on. This opens up a lot of creative possibilities for topside videography. So, 0-20 seconds represents just touching the screen to focus. :24-:29 second shows what dragging your finger across the touch screen will do. :30-:54 is a hand-held image stabilizer test (at 250mm)[it passed the test :)]. Starting at :55 seconds I am at the farmers market comparing video capabilities between the Nikon D7000 and the Canon 70D. I expected a bigger difference but they were not too different. Now for some explanation. The Nikon ONLY shoots 24 fps. This sucks (Canon shoots 30 fps at 1080p and 60fps at 720p). At 24 fps the video is jittery if there is any panning involved. Shooting video on a dslr has been problematic in the past because if you have it set on an auto mode (program, aperture or shutter preferred) when you migrate to a different set of lighting conditions (bright to dim) the camera changes the exposure in noticeable steps (f:8>f:11>f:16 or 60th/sec, 125th/sec, 250th/sec) this causes flicker in the video. It ramps down or up in steps. So. from 55 to 1:21 you see the Nikon performance. The flicker is subtle but noticeable (1:09-1:15). To solve this it is recommended to set the camera on 'Manual'. The problem with this is that when the lighting conditions change, the camera records it accurately: when you go from light to dark, things get darker. If you attempt to compensate using the shutter speed or ISO, it will change in very obvious step values, instead of a smooth transition from light to dark. 1:22 TO 1:29 show an example of this. 1:30 to 2:07 show how the Canon deals with it. Although I put the camera closer than the lens was able to focus (on the mango) for a few seconds, the exposure (on Av) and the autofocus seemed to work smoothly and acceptably. The last clip from 2:08 to 2:46 has me walking through the farmers market tapping the touch screen to change focal points. I have added text showing approximately where I tapped the screen to see the results. ISO was 800. I am pretty happy overall but the Canon sometimes did take a long time to adjust its metering going from light to dark.

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