1. CLAi were brought in to make an event film recording of the 2nd staging of the Resilience Event, a one to two hour live performance held in the heart of the Stanford Campus, at the natural amphitheater at Meyer Green. A staging company were brought in to provide staging, video projection, lighting and sound, while we were to shoot the storytelling, song and dance event with six cameras - ranging from GoPros to our 4k Sony RAW F5 and FS7 cameras.

    Unfortunately, the evening chosen for the uncovered event also turned out to be one of the worst days and nights of weather damage in Stanford's history, as a powerful storm rolled into the area and stopped directly over the campus for several hours. The 60 to 75 mile an hour winds pulled down trees and shredded the tent supports we had for the equipment, while the stage area was flooded by the torrential rain.

    It became obvious that the event could not go on as planned, and 45 minutes before the planned 8am start of the show we received a request from our Resilience Project/Vice Provost for Student Affairs clients to pull down all of the cameras and rigging and move as much of it as possible to the CoHo coffee house - some way around the sealed Stanford Campus area where Meyer Green is, in the pouring rain with a very small crew and one vehicle.

    In the true spirit of Resilience, we made it over to the intimate little coffee house, with it's fifteen foot stage raised a foot, to find it packed to bursting point with students and faculty waiting for the show. The first wave of Chris Layhe and Lynton Vandersteen, carrying one Sony F5 camera, a set of sticks, one mic that had to be taped to the single mic stand and fed direct into the camera arrived, found a shooting position, sorted out the staging and players - and started shooting as the show began on time at 8pm.

    Over the next half an hour John Tulin, Stephen Van Der Ropp and Stephanie Layhe arrived with two more camera systems and an audio recorder, which were started up as each of them came into the building - positioned wherever they could fit between people. So, as the film progresses you see it changing from a single camera shoot to a restricted three camera shoot. Other than the audio issues caused by some of the players standing in front of the microphone we managed to record the entire event, without having to stop or disrupt the performance - and condense a well designed six camera four hour setup and rehearse into forty minutes of frenetic, and very wet energy!

    The end piece shows just what can be done by production company and performers when faced with considerable challenges and adversity - to make an event, and an event film, that most of the audience felt was far more "real" than a big staged presentation. What could be a better example of "Stanford Resilience"...

    "THE RESILIENCE PROJECT combines personal storytelling, events, programs, and academic skills coaching to motivate and support students as they experience the setbacks that are a normal part of a rigorous education. We help students learn from failure and hope to instill a sense of belonging and bravery. Our goal is to help change the perception of failure from something to be avoided at all costs, to something that has meaning, purpose, and value."

    Shoot Crew:
    Chris Layhe, 2nd Camera and Director (Sony FS7 4k RAW)
    Lynton Vandersteen, 1st Camera (Sony F5 4k RAW)
    John Tulin, 3rd Camera (Sony A7Sii 4k RAW)
    Stephen Van Der Ropp, Audio Recordist (Should have been GoPro Cameras 4k)
    Stephanie Layhe, PA & Transport

    Production:
    Chris Layhe, Producer, Editor & Colorist

    # vimeo.com/225708892 Uploaded
  2. At the end of 2016 CLAi were approached by the Monterey Regional Waste Management District to create a short five minute documentary program about the 60 years history of the MRWMD turning waste into resources for the communities they serve.

    Of course, our immediate reaction was to ask what a landfill facility in Monterey Bay could have done that was interesting and had value to viewers. Well, it turns out that the District may be a mid-sized, regional facility, but nobody seems to have told them that - and they consistently win national and international awards and recognition for their creative solutions to turning household and industrial waste into valuable resources for their community while helping to cut costs. I was shocked when the guys there started to go through all of the firsts they have, and the impact they have made.

    So we took a closer look at the District and suggested making the history documentary, along with a number of 60 second video documentary teasers on many of the District's operations that together would be used as an interactive journey around the MRWMD. As we got further into what was being done the history video was put to one side for the time being, and we extended the running time of each of the nine individual stories to between three and six minutes to give enough time to both explain the physical aspects of their work and the impact that they have individually and as a group.

    These nine documentary pieces are still brought together as an interactive experience on their web site, but are also available to view individually. They have also been added to with short versions and teaser videos on different aspects of the MRWMD experience, and other documentary pieces are in the pipeline. Thinking and living green, and enacting reduce, reuse, recycle strategies are just where the MRWMD began... what they are doing today is astounding!

    "The Community Franchise Collection Facility at the Monterey Regional Waste Management District was opened in 2017 to provide a new, eco-friendly home for the Green Waste Recovery fleet of refuse and food waste collection vehicles. One of the highlights of the new facility is that all 100 vehicles can not only park here overnight, but also fuel up on CNG methane fuel at slow fill pumps on each parking stall, or at two high speed CNG pumps. There is also a video short of this program available at vimeo.com/220992590/ for you to see, and please do visit our web site at mrwmd.org for more information and links to other videos."

    Talent:
    Dakota Ordonio
    Jonathan Ordonio

    Shoot Crew:
    Chris Layhe, Director and DP / Cinematographer
    Meghan Collins, Producer
    Leif Crook, Drone Pilot and AC
    Dylan Pele, 1st AC and 2nd Cameraman
    Stephen Pacey, Gaffer
    Paul Cordukes, Gaffer

    Production:
    Chris Layhe, Director, Video Editor and Colorist
    Meghan Collins, Producer

    # vimeo.com/225708318 Uploaded
  3. At the end of 2016 CLAi were approached by the Monterey Regional Waste Management District to create a short five minute documentary program about the 60 years history of the MRWMD turning waste into resources for the communities they serve.

    Of course, our immediate reaction was to ask what a landfill facility in Monterey Bay could have done that was interesting and had value to viewers. Well, it turns out that the District may be a mid-sized, regional facility, but nobody seems to have told them that - and they consistently win national and international awards and recognition for their creative solutions to turning household and industrial waste into valuable resources for their community while helping to cut costs. I was shocked when the guys there started to go through all of the firsts they have, and the impact they have made.

    So we took a closer look at the District and suggested making the history documentary, along with a number of 60 second video documentary teasers on many of the District's operations that together would be used as an interactive journey around the MRWMD. As we got further into what was being done the history video was put to one side for the time being, and we extended the running time of each of the nine individual stories to between three and six minutes to give enough time to both explain the physical aspects of their work and the impact that they have individually and as a group.

    These nine documentary pieces are still brought together as an interactive experience on their web site, but are also available to view individually. They have also been added to with short versions and teaser videos on different aspects of the MRWMD experience, and other documentary pieces are in the pipeline. Thinking and living green, and enacting reduce, reuse, recycle strategies are just where the MRWMD began... what they are doing today is astounding!

    "The MRWMD Material Recovery Facility is, in many ways, the heart of the District as it is where most of the materials that we recover, reuse and recycle are collected.

    For more details about the MRF and the entire Monterey Regional Waste Management District go to MRWMD.org

    The Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) opened in April 1996 in response to state law AB939, which required cities and counties to reduce their waste 50% by the year 2000. The $9.6 million facility was designed to process construction and demolition debris, as well as to complement the recycling collected from homes and businesses. Over the last 20 years, the MRF has diverted more than 1.6 million tons of recyclable and reusable materials from landfill disposal.

    The MRF diverts 50% of the incoming mixed waste through reuse and recycling. Unlike residential and commercial recycling programs that collect source separated materials only, the MRF annually processes more than 100,000 tons of mixed waste that arrives in debris boxes, dumpsters, pick-up trucks, and trailers. The MRF also receives source separated green waste and wood scraps, which are the raw materials for making compost and wood chips.

    To keep up with new regulatory mandates and to continue to ensure compliance for member agencies, work will commence in 2017 on an $18 million MRF Improvement Project. Construction of the facility began in February with completion by October 2017.

    MRF improvements will help ensure that the District member agencies achieve the state's 75 percent diversion goal by 2020 and the ban on landfill disposal of commercial food scraps. The facility will also support local construction industry compliance with the 65% recycling requirement defined in the CalGreen building code that is effective January 1, 2017.

    We also remove items from the MRF that can be sold through our Last Chance Mercantile store, create organic compost for the community and the area's farms from lawn and landscaping waste and timber, and sell mattresses and appliances to specialty recyclers. Even the soil that is collected is reused - to cover the landfill each evening."

    Talent:
    Jose Garcia
    Joseph Cooper

    Shoot Crew:
    Chris Layhe, Director and DP / Cinematographer
    Meghan Collins, Producer
    Leif Crook, Drone Pilot and 2nd AC
    Dylan Pele, 1st AC and 2nd Cameraman
    Stephen Pacey, Gaffer
    Paul Cordukes, Gaffer

    Production:
    Chris Layhe, Director, Video Editor and Colorist
    Meghan Collins, Producer

    # vimeo.com/225702997 Uploaded
  4. At the end of 2016 CLAi were approached by the Monterey Regional Waste Management District to create a short five minute documentary program about the 60 years history of the MRWMD turning waste into resources for the communities they serve.

    Of course, our immediate reaction was to ask what a landfill facility in Monterey Bay could have done that was interesting and had value to viewers. Well, it turns out that the District may be a mid-sized, regional facility, but nobody seems to have told them that - and they consistently win national and international awards and recognition for their creative solutions to turning household and industrial waste into valuable resources for their community while helping to cut costs. I was shocked when the guys there started to go through all of the firsts they have, and the impact they have made.

    So we took a closer look at the District and suggested making the history documentary, along with a number of 60 second video documentary teasers on many of the District's operations that together would be used as an interactive journey around the MRWMD. As we got further into what was being done the history video was put to one side for the time being, and we extended the running time of each of the nine individual stories to between three and six minutes to give enough time to both explain the physical aspects of their work and the impact that they have individually and as a group.

    These nine documentary pieces are still brought together as an interactive experience on their web site, but are also available to view individually. They have also been added to with short versions and teaser videos on different aspects of the MRWMD experience, and other documentary pieces are in the pipeline. Thinking and living green, and enacting reduce, reuse, recycle strategies are just where the MRWMD began... what they are doing today is astounding!

    "The Monterey Regional Waste Management District's Last Chance Mercantile is based on a simple but still unique concept - take the goods which have been thrown into the waste stream, along with ones donated by the public and businesses, and sell them at a reasonable cost if they have the potential to be reused and recycled...

    For more details about the MRF and the entire Monterey Regional Waste Management District go to MRWMD.org

    The Last Chance Mercantile (LCM) took root in 1991 by re-purposing an old building once used by a flower grower. Staff considered calling the program the Second Chance Mercantile but ultimately chose the Last Chance because anything that didn't sell was destined for the landfill. The Last Chance Mercantile name stuck and the first sales event was an auction held in 1991. This was followed by monthly flea markets which evolved into a part-time store, and eventually the five day-per-week operation it is today.

    Now 25 years later, the LCM has grown to include a staff of 12 that host a busy resale store with an eclectic and ever changing inventory, a convenient reusable goods drop-off area, a beverage container redemption center, electronic waste drop-off, and a bag-your-own landscape product area. In 2016, reuse was elevated to an art form with the establishment of the Artist in Residence program in partnership with the Visual & Public Art Department at CSUMB.

    Reusable good donations are always welcome at the LCM. Local residents that wish to donate items but don't have the ability to deliver them to the store now have the option of contacting their hauler to utilize the Bulky Item Collection Program that is now available throughout the Monterey Peninsula and Monterey County areas. Contact your recycling and solid waste service collection provider for more information on a curbside pick-up.

    Today, a trip out to the District isn't complete without a stop at the LCM. Over the years, the store has earned a reputation in the solid waste industry for its innovative approach to reuse while locally it is legendary as the place where one person's trash becomes another's treasure."

    Talent:
    Philomena Block
    Bascomb Arnette
    Stephen Pacey

    Shoot Crew:
    Chris Layhe, Director and DP / Cinematographer
    Meghan Collins, Producer
    Leif Crook, Drone Pilot and AC
    Dylan Pele, 1st AC and 2nd Cameraman
    Stephen Pacey, Gaffer
    Paul Cordukes, Gaffer

    Production:
    Chris Layhe, Director, Video Editor and Colorist
    Meghan Collins, Producer

    # vimeo.com/225702267 Uploaded
  5. At the end of 2016 CLAi were approached by the Monterey Regional Waste Management District to create a short five minute documentary program about the 60 years history of the MRWMD turning waste into resources for the communities they serve.

    Of course, our immediate reaction was to ask what a landfill facility in Monterey Bay could have done that was interesting and had value to viewers. Well, it turns out that the District may be a mid-sized, regional facility, but nobody seems to have told them that - and they consistently win national and international awards and recognition for their creative solutions to turning household and industrial waste into valuable resources for their community while helping to cut costs. I was shocked when the guys there started to go through all of the firsts they have, and the impact they have made.

    So we took a closer look at the District and suggested making the history documentary, along with a number of 60 second video documentary teasers on many of the District's operations that together would be used as an interactive journey around the MRWMD. As we got further into what was being done the history video was put to one side for the time being, and we extended the running time of each of the nine individual stories to between three and six minutes to give enough time to both explain the physical aspects of their work and the impact that they have individually and as a group.

    These nine documentary pieces are still brought together as an interactive experience on their web site, but are also available to view individually. They have also been added to with short versions and teaser videos on different aspects of the MRWMD experience, and other documentary pieces are in the pipeline. Thinking and living green, and enacting reduce, reuse, recycle strategies are just where the MRWMD began... what they are doing today is astounding!

    "The MRWMD Landfill Gas Facility is where we collect and convert the methane gas that is created in the Monterey Peninsula Landfill as organic materials decompose and turn it into enough electricity to not only make the District fully self-sufficient, but then to have power left over to sell to PG&E.

    For more details about the Landfill Gas and the entire Monterey Regional Waste Management District go to MRWMD.org

    In 1983, long before the benefits of renewable energy and the negative effects of greenhouse gas missions were realized, the District developed one of the first landfill gas-to-electricity energy plants in the nation. Methane and carbon dioxide gases are byproducts of the anaerobic decomposition of organic waste in the landfill. The District's landfill gas collection system of horizontal and vertical wells now extract more than 610 million cubic feet of gas per year (about 50% methane and 50% carbon dioxide) from refuse buried since the Monterey Peninsula Landfill opened in 1966.

    The system that collects the landfill gas covers an area slightly under 85 acres. Currently, there are a total of 29 vertical wells and 23 horizontal collectors providing landfill gas to four engine generators. The average depth of the vertical wells is 100 feet and the average length of the horizontal collectors is 525 feet. The gas field is monitored weekly for dynamic changes due to seasonal and weather impacts. One design change that has been implemented is the use of chipped tires instead of drain rock along the horizontal collectors. This is done in part to demonstrate the District's ongoing commitment to find a beneficial reuse for materials, in this case, tires.

    Today, the Landfill Gas Renewable Energy Project's four engine generators provide approximately 5
    megawatts of electricity, meeting all of the District's own power needs and supplying enough
    surplus electricity to power about 4,000 homes. State and federal authorities classify the electricity generated by the project as renewable or "green" energy."

    Talent:
    Gabriel Mercado

    Shoot Crew:
    Chris Layhe, Director and DP / Cinematographer
    Meghan Collins, Producer
    Leif Crook, Drone Pilot and AC
    Dylan Pele, 1st AC and 2nd Cameraman
    Stephen Pacey, Gaffer
    Paul Cordukes, Gaffer

    Production:
    Chris Layhe, Director, Video Editor and Colorist
    Meghan Collins, Producer

    # vimeo.com/225701628 Uploaded

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