1. Ann Morris, Partner at Finn Partners, is here with some advice on developing a communications plan before a crisis.

    Visit EmploymentLawThisWeek.com.

    These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® is a registered trademark of Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

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  2. Welcome to Employment Law This Week® ! Subscribe to our channel for new episodes every Monday!

    This week's stories include . . .

    (1) EEOC Loses Transgender Case in Michigan

    Our top story: An employer wins a landmark case after firing a transgender employee. A funeral home in Michigan decided to terminate its director after he notified the business that he would be transitioning from male to female. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed suit. On a motion to dismiss, a U.S. district court held that Title VII does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of transgender status or gender identity but allowed the EEOC to pursue a claim for sex stereotyping. The funeral home argued that it was protected under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), and the district court agreed, granting the employer’s motion for summary judgment. Kate Rhodes, from Epstein Becker Green, has more.

    “Once the employer is able to prove that they are entitled to a defense under the RFRA, the EEOC has a burden of not just establishing that the purpose of Title VII is a compelling government interest, but it also has to show that the means and application of Title VII was done in the least burdensome way possible. The EEOC failed to address this point in their briefing, and also failed to examine whether this was the least restrictive, or whether there was an alternative, way to enforce Title VII against this employer. . . . In order to be eligible to invoke the RFRA, an employer has to be a private, closely held corporation and cannot be a publicly traded corporation. Secondly, the RFRA can only be invoked if the party suing the employer is the government or a government agency. And third, if the employer is a government itself, they can’t invoke that they have a religion, and therefore the RFRA is not applicable.”

    (2) New York City Mandates “Labor Peace” Agreements

    New York City is trying to force certain employers to sign "labor peace" agreements with unions. Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed an executive order mandating that a property developer receiving at least $1 million in “Financial Assistance” require its large retail and food service tenants to accept “Labor Peace Agreements.” These agreements would prohibit the companies from opposing union organization and provide what some consider to be affirmative support and assistance to unions. City Development Projects that were authorized or received “Financial Assistance” before July 14, 2016, are exempt from this order.

    For more on this story, click here: http://bit.ly/2bjZycV

    (3) Lawmakers Urge Rejection of EEOC’s Pay Data Proposal

    Senators ask for a halt to the EEOC’s pay data proposal. Three Republican senators have sent a letter to the Office of Management and Budget asking them to shut down a recent proposal from the EEOC. The proposal would expand pay data collection and require employers to categorize hours worked by sex, ethnicity, and race. The lawmakers argue that this kind of data collection would waste time and put significant new burdens on employers.

    (4) Parental Leave Requests Increase as School Year Starts

    Parental leave requests are on the rise as kids head back to school. An increasing number of states now require that businesses grant unpaid leave to employees for school-related events and activities that happen during the workday. These laws apply to private employers in Washington, D.C., and in such states as California and Massachusetts. As the school year begins, employers will likely see more requests for parental leave and should consider checking the laws in their states to make sure they’re in compliance.

    (5) Tip of the Week

    Finally, it’s time for our Tip of the Week. Ann Morris, Partner at Finn Partners, is here with some advice on developing a communications plan before a crisis.

    Visit EmploymentLawThisWeek.com.

    These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® is a registered trademark of Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

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  3. Beginning in 2018, pay history will be off limits for Massachusetts job applications and interviews. In a unique attempt to close the gender wage gap, the state has passed a pay equity law that will bar employers from asking applicants about their previous salaries. Employers will also be prohibited from seeking that information from an applicant’s prior employers. While this provision is the first of its kind in the country, the new law also contains more common equal pay protections, broadens the definition of “equal work,” and prevents employers from banning the discussion of salary among employees. Mickey Neuhauser, from Epstein Becker Green, has more.

    Visit EmploymentLawThisWeek.com.

    These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® is a registered trademark of Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

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  4. A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) does not cover sexual orientation bias. A teacher at a community college filed suit after being passed over six times for a full-time position, alleging that the rejections were based on her being a lesbian. The Seventh Circuit panel, in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College, upheld a lower court's dismissal of the case, noting that sexual orientation is not included in the workplace protections covered under Title VII. The three-judge panel criticized this lack of protection but said that any change must come from the U.S. Supreme Court or a new federal law from Congress. Jeremy Brown, from Epstein Becker Green, has more.

    Visit EmploymentLawThisWeek.com.

    These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® is a registered trademark of Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

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  5. Chamber: Executive Incentive Pay Rule Could Stunt Growth - http://bit.ly/2ai4vjL

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce claims that the new executive incentive pay rule could stunt economic growth. The proposed rule lays out a tiering system for regulating bonus pay for bank executives and other employees in the financial sector. The Chamber’s 26-page letter argues that the rule could deter the best minds from entering the financial sector and discourage economic growth and job creation. The FDIC has said that the letter will be taken into account during the review process. Gretchen Harders, from Epstein Becker Green, has more. http://bit.ly/2afFNRY

    Visit EmploymentLawThisWeek.com.

    These materials have been provided for informational purposes only and are not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. The content of these materials is copyrighted to Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. EMPLOYMENT LAW THIS WEEK® is a registered trademark of Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

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Employment Law This Week®

Epstein Becker Green PRO

Welcome to Employment Law This Week®, presented by Epstein Becker Green. This online video program – among the first of its kind in the legal industry – will deliver the most significant stories and developments in employment, labor, and workforce management…


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Welcome to Employment Law This Week®, presented by Epstein Becker Green. This online video program – among the first of its kind in the legal industry – will deliver the most significant stories and developments in employment, labor, and workforce management issues in about five minutes, each week.

Tune in each week for developments that may affect your business. Learn more at ebglaw.com/employment-law-this-week/

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