1. We created a new and animated interpretation of 'The Garden Of Earthly Delights' by Hieronymus Bosch. We were chosen to go crazy on the middle panel. So we did... in 4K! It is also an infinite loop in 4K. 4K 4K 4K!!!

    See our press release below for a short explanation.

    Unfortunately the exhibition at MOTI Museum has ended. Hope you got to see it. It was HUGE and AWESOME! But don't worry, it will pop up again somewhere. Until then, enjoy the online version.

    motimuseum.nl

    facebook: facebook.com/STUDIO-SMACK-287330375863 | twitter: twitter.com/STUDIOSMACK | website: studiosmack.nl

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    Official Press Release:

    PARADISE, a contemporary interpretation of The Garden of Earthly Delights

    Studio Smack, best known for their music video Witch Doctor by De Staat, have released a new animation: a contemporary interpretation of one of the most famous paintings by the Early Dutch master Hieronymus Bosch, The Garden of Earthly Delights.

    In their latest work, the group cleared the original landscape of the middle panel of Bosch’s painting and reconstructed it into a hallucinatory 4K animation. The creatures that populate this indoor playground embody the excesses and desires of 21st century Western civilization. Consumerism, selfishness, escapism, the lure of eroticism, vanity and decadence. All characters are metaphors for our society where loners swarm their digital dream world. They are symbolic reflections of egos and an imagination of people as they see themselves - unlike Bosch's version, where all individuals more or less look the same. From a horny Hello Kitty to a coke hunting penis snake. From an incarnate spybot to headless fried chickens.

    These characters, once precisely painted dream figures, are now digitally created 3D models. All of them have been given their own animation loop to wander through the landscape. By placing them altogether in this synthetic fresco, the picture is never the same. What the animation and Bosch’s triptych have in common is that you’ll hardly be able to take it all in, you can watch it for hours.

    ‘Paradise’ was commissioned by the MOTI Museum in The Netherlands for the exhibition New Delights, which is part of the Hieronymus Bosch 500-year anniversary. A gigantic video installation of this work was exhibited in the Museum until the 31st of December 2016.

    # vimeo.com/191632804 Uploaded 687K Plays 99 Comments
  2. Arctic Paper – Visions of a transforming world.
    Inspired by nature.

    Exploring the interface of tactile and virtual worlds for Arctic paper as part of the communication for two new design paper collections.

    Client: Arctic Paper
    Agency: JUNO
    Concept, Art and Creative Direction : JUNO & ZEITGUISED
    Design and Animation: ZEITGUISED
    Sound: Michael Fakesch

    arcticpaper.com
    juno-hamburg.com
    zeitguised.com

    # vimeo.com/190532958 Uploaded 27.5K Plays 4 Comments
  3. When working on this project, I was deeply inspired by the dynamics of motion and philosophy of Kung Fu. Masters: Lee Shek Lin, Wong Yiu Kau.

    Visualizing the invisible is always fascinating, and motion visualizations have been created even in pre-digital times with light, photography, costumes or paintings. I have described some of the methods that I applied in this work in my book "Grids for the Dynamic Images", published 2003.

    # vimeo.com/163153865 Uploaded 1.4M Plays 105 Comments
  4. “The studio is the sponge and the outside world is the water … The sponge is dipped into reality and then squeezed out.” Daniel Richter, one of the most important painters of his generation, talks about the transformative power of painting.

    “The studio is like a teenage room; you close the door from the inside and your mother isn’t allowed to come in. You don’t necessarily do anything forbidden or taboo, but it’s something you don’t want others to see,” says Richter jokingly of the work that goes on in the artist’s engine room. Multi-layered and crammed with historic and cultural references, his large-scale paintings come to life in the studio. “It’s like the brain,” he explains. “It inherits history and has different layers; language, music, memories, moods. It’s a place where you can analyse very precisely but you can also just drift.”

    Richter came of age on the Hamburg punk scene where he produced record covers, band posters and political flyers, but he didn’t start painting until he was in his late twenties. “I wanted to bring as much information into a painting as possible, which was, on a very simple level, a way of coping with reality,” he says of his early work made in post-World War II Germany and marked by the 1990’s: the end of the Cold War, changing global relationships and the birth of the internet. Richter’s more recent work has transformed into more recognizable narratives, a kind of contemporary history painting: “When I changed to narration it was also an urge that had to do, on a very simple level, with reality … I felt the desire to paint things that related to what I saw in the world.” Not as a means of lecturing, explains Richter of his very political work, but as a way of working through the insecurity, fear and paranoia of being in the world. The key, he says, is to avoid distance and to make painting human: “The moment you take something that has a human effect on you, something you can’t describe, the whole thing transforms from a topic to something that is about yourself.”

    Daniel Richter (b. 1962) is a German painter whose strongly coloured, often slightly surreal paintings convey current events and art historical issues with an irreverent and energetic approach. A professor at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna, Austria, his work is widely exhibited, among others at Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, The Netherlands, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany and Victoria Miro Gallery in London. Richter’s paintings can be found in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Centre Pompidou, Paris and elsewhere.

    Daniel Richter was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner in his studio in Berlin, Germany, and at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, in July 2016, in connection with the exhibition Lonely Old Slogans.

    Camera: Klaus Elmer & Rasmus Quistgaard Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner
    Edited by: Klaus Elmer
    Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016

    Supported by Nordea-fonden

    # vimeo.com/181768313 Uploaded

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Denis Val'kov

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