1. Robotic Mass Customization

    Author:
    J. Braumann, P. Hornung, R. Krobath, S. Brell-Cokcan, G. Glaeser

    Company/University:
    Robots in Architecture and University for Applied Arts Vienna with Becker LG

    Description:
    "Robotic Woodcraft" is a transdisciplinary research project that brings together roboticists, architects, master carpenters with decades of experience with wood, mathematicians with elaborate knowledge of geometry, and practicing designers, with the goal of investigating interfaces and robots as instruments for artists, designers and architects to play with the geometry of motion and to couple multifunctional robots with the similarly diverse material wood.
    In this 2-day workshop, Robotic Woodcraft collaborated with the high-end manufacturer of moulded plywood, Becker KG. Using parametric definitions, we transformed standardized, "raw" wooden shells into highly customized products, using a heavy-payload KUKA Quantec robot and the robot-programming/simulation environment KUKA|prc.

    Link:
    roboticwoodcraft.com
    robotsinarchitecture.org
    dieangewandte.at

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  2. Robotic Softness: Behavioural Fabrication Process of a Woven Space

    This video has been accepted to be presented at Rob|Arch 2016 (robarch2016.org) through the Rob|Arch 2016 Call for Videos.

    Authors:
    G. Brugnaro; Supervisor / First Examiner: Prof. A. Menges; Second Examiner: Prof. J. Knippers; Tutors: E. Baharlou, L. Vasey.

    Company/University:
    ITECH Master Programme, University of Stuttgart.

    Description:
    Aim of the project was exploring the potential of behavioural fabrication strategies in comparison with construction processes based on pure notation, where only what can be drawn and measured, can be built. The term “Robotic Softness” refers to the idea of conceiving robotic fabrication methods as “soft systems”, intended as flexible, adaptable and evolving frameworks where the moment of design unfolds together with the fabrication one, constantly being informed by real-time sensor data.
    In order to challenge this theoretical framework, the research focused on the design and robotic production of three-dimensional woven structures inspired by the behavioural fabrication logic used by the weaverbird during the construction of its nest. These structures are not successful for specific properties of the material they are made of, but rather for the procedural logic that the bird follows to put them together. Therefore, the biomimetic research focused on the analysis of these set of behaviours and strategies and their abstraction in a robotic fabrication context.
    The research development led to the design of an integrative computational tool, composed by different components such as an online agent-based control system, a custom weaving end-effector and a coordinated sensing strategy based on 3D scanning procedures. The final outcome of the behavioural fabrication process could not be predetermined in a blueprint drawing or digital model but it rather emerges out of the negotiation between different fabrication constraints, defined performance criteria, material behaviours and specific site conditions.

    Link: icd.uni-stuttgart.de/?p=15521

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  3. ROBOTRACK

    This video has been accepted to be presented at Rob|Arch 2016 (robarch2016.org) through the Rob|Arch 2016 Call for Videos.

    Authors:
    Instructor: R. Weissenböck
    Student Assistants: P. Frick, L. Grimm
    Participating students: J. Aigner, L. Albrecht, P. Flachhuber, I. Fuchs, E. Huta, E. M. Kern, E. Kertusha, M. Klaus, P. Knoll, J. Lebitsch, V. Moser, G. Pavic, B. Raskaj, T. S. Roser, M. Sar, P. Schitter, B. Sipka, A. Sorger, P. Vinicki, K. Wagner, L. Wokatsch.

    Company/University:
    Graz University of Technology, Institute of Architecture and Media

    Description:
    ROBOTRACK: capturing manual processes and translating them to the robot
    This video is based on a seminar taught by Renate Weissenböck at Graz University of Technology, Institute of Architecture and Media, in winter term 2015/16. In this course, students work in the dynamic field between craft, material and machine. By manual forming of panels, they are introduced to the material and forming behaviour of plastics. Engaging these hands-on approach - overlaid with intuition and experience - students are able to explore different shapes and design outcomes. They build up a design intent, which further informs a digital fabrication process.
    The goal of this seminar is to understand the relation between manual and robotic forming. This is accomplished by capturing the hand-forming process with a motion tracking system. The movements that produced the most successful hand-forming prototypes are repeated, captured by 6 infrared cameras, and fed into a digital 3D-modell. Subsequently the captured data is translated to robotic operations using different strategies: direct translation, picking one pattern and replicating it, or altering and optimizing the manual process. The students use different software packages and plugins, including Rhinoceros, Grasshopper and HAL, a Grasshopper plugin for industrial robots programming.

    Links:
    iam.tugraz.at/
    iam.tugraz.at/workshop15w/

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  4. The ERNE Gantry Robot

    This video has been accepted to be presented at Rob|Arch 2016 (robarch2016.org) through the Rob|Arch 2016 Call for Videos.

    Authors:
    ERNE AG Holzbau; production: makanart

    Company/University:
    ERNE AG Holzbau, Laufenburg, Switzerland

    Description: The start-up of the gantry robot at ERNE AG Holzbau rings in the future of timber construction. The opportunities that are now opening up in terms of modern timber construction for architects, clients and planners are individual, multi-faceted, highly precise and come in many different shapes.
    Architects and designers can contribute their creativity and design expertise by applying digital models and engineering know-how. New forms, new shapes of yet unknown quality can be developed within short deadlines.
    While former processing machines were limited to subtraction procedures, i.e. to removing something from an existing body, this new system is using additive processes; the robot assembles bodies. The assembly includes supporting structure, walls and roofs, facades and even concrete formwork up to 50 m long, 1.4 m high and 5.6 m wide. This is possible thanks to the wide choice of tools the modern tool-head taken on from the automotive industry is able to handle.

    Link:
    erne.net

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  5. The ERNE System for Robotically Fabricated Facades

    This video has been accepted to be presented at Rob|Arch 2016 (robarch2016.org) through the Rob|Arch 2016 Call for Videos.

    Authors:
    ERNE AG Holzbau; production: unitedeverything

    Company/University:
    ERNE AG Holzbau, Laufenburg, Switzerland

    Description:
    With the ERNE Robot is is possible to assemble supporting structures, walls and roofs, facades and even concrete formwork up to 50 m long, 1.4 m high and 5.6 m wide. This is possible thanks to the wide choice of tools the modern tool-head taken on from the automotive industry is able to handle.
    The video shows the production of large scale façade elements using robotics.

    Link:
    erne.net

    # vimeo.com/158804696 Uploaded 997 Plays 0 Comments

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