1. In this clip Javier Gualinga, an ornithologist and guide at Sani Lodge, tell us how the oil companies threatened to forcefully take over the land his of his indigenous Kichwa community deep in the Ecuadorian Amazon.
    It seems the oil companies will go to any lenghts, even enlisteng the help or armed paramilitaries and the police to gain a foothold in these precious unspoiled regions...

    This documentary is completely self-funded.
    Please like/share and support:
    facebook.com/WDYDTL
    twitter.com/WordSmithProd
    wordsmithproductions.co.uk

    Why is the Ecuadorian government proposing to extract oil in an area frequently classified by ecologists as one of the most biodiverse rainforest regions left intact on earth?
    Filmed in Sani Isla and Ecuador’s capital city, Quito, this feature-length self-funded documentary film tells the story of the indigenous Kichwa community living in Sani Isla along the Napo River, bordering the Yasuni national park. Narrated by Daddy G of Massive Attack, the film features music especially composed for the project by Daddy G and Stew Jackson.
    It features:
    Academics who explain the governments push for oil in order to fund development;
    Leading researchers who demonstrate the unique species and rich biodiversity existing within the region;
    Community members explaining their long history in the area, and their plans for a sustainable future based on eco-tourism for future generations;
    And a government minister who was part of a now cancelled initiative which could have saved the region entirely.
    Repeatedly threatened with enforced oil extraction by both the government and military on their ancestral land, the people of Sani Isla have thus-far remained strong in the face of Petro-dollar$, resolving instead to maintain their traditional way of life.
    Breaking their bond with a forest that has sustained their people for generations would be the death of their culture and community.
    Community leader and shaman Patricio Jipa explains that their fight to conserve the forest – the lungs of the universe – is a cause we should all lend our voices to and support.
    Where do you draw the line?

    # vimeo.com/192358152 Uploaded
  2. In this clip Patricio Jipa, shaman and community leader, Kevin Keonig of Amazon Watch and Severino Sharupi of CONAIE explain what lengths the oil companies and their representatives wil go to in order to infiltrate and trick their way into indigenous communites. It seems the oil companies know no boundaries, even enlisting the help or armed paramilitaries and the police to gain a foothold in these precious unspoiled regions...

    This documentary is completely self-funded.
    Please like/share and support:
    facebook.com/WDYDTL
    twitter.com/WordSmithProd
    wordsmithproductions.co.uk

    Why is the Ecuadorian government proposing to extract oil in an area frequently classified by ecologists as one of the most biodiverse rainforest regions left intact on earth?
    Filmed in Sani Isla and Ecuador’s capital city, Quito, this feature-length self-funded documentary film tells the story of the indigenous Kichwa community living in Sani Isla along the Napo River, bordering the Yasuni national park. Narrated by Daddy G of Massive Attack, the film features music especially composed for the project by Daddy G and Stew Jackson.
    It features:
    Academics who explain the governments push for oil in order to fund development;
    Leading researchers who demonstrate the unique species and rich biodiversity existing within the region;
    Community members explaining their long history in the area, and their plans for a sustainable future based on eco-tourism for future generations;
    And a government minister who was part of a now cancelled initiative which could have saved the region entirely.
    Repeatedly threatened with enforced oil extraction by both the government and military on their ancestral land, the people of Sani Isla have thus-far remained strong in the face of Petro-dollar$, resolving instead to maintain their traditional way of life.
    Breaking their bond with a forest that has sustained their people for generations would be the death of their culture and community.
    Community leader and shaman Patricio Jipa explains that their fight to conserve the forest – the lungs of the universe – is a cause we should all lend our voices to and support.
    Where do you draw the line?

    # vimeo.com/192829326 Uploaded
  3. In this clip Dr Kelly Swing, professor of Biology at Universidad San Fransisco de Quito and Director of the Tiputini Biodiversity Station reveals how mankind is heading down a dangerous path if we continue to prioritise profits over preservation. At some point, we will cause an environmental disatster- that affects all of us.

    This documentary is completely self-funded.
    Please like/share and support:
    facebook.com/WDYDTL
    twitter.com/WordSmithProd
    wordsmithproductions.co.uk

    Why is the Ecuadorian government proposing to extract oil in an area frequently classified by ecologists as one of the most biodiverse rainforest regions left intact on earth?
    Filmed in Sani Isla and Ecuador’s capital city, Quito, this feature-length self-funded documentary film tells the story of the indigenous Kichwa community living in Sani Isla along the Napo River, bordering the Yasuni national park. Narrated by Daddy G of Massive Attack, the film features music especially composed for the project by Daddy G and Stew Jackson.
    It features:
    Academics who explain the governments push for oil in order to fund development;
    Leading researchers who demonstrate the unique species and rich biodiversity existing within the region;
    Community members explaining their long history in the area, and their plans for a sustainable future based on eco-tourism for future generations;
    And a government minister who was part of a now cancelled initiative which could have saved the region entirely.
    Repeatedly threatened with enforced oil extraction by both the government and military on their ancestral land, the people of Sani Isla have thus-far remained strong in the face of Petro-dollar$, resolving instead to maintain their traditional way of life.
    Breaking their bond with a forest that has sustained their people for generations would be the death of their culture and community.
    Community leader and shaman Patricio Jipa explains that their fight to conserve the forest – the lungs of the universe – is a cause we should all lend our voices to and support.
    Where do you draw the line?

    # vimeo.com/192833052 Uploaded
  4. In this clip, Kurikidi Jipa, shaman and community leader of Communidad Sani Isla, Kevon Koenig of Amazon Watch, and Bianca Tapuiy, healer and organisor of the Sani Isla womens project, explain the dangers and impacts oil extraction can have on communities in terms of pollution, destruction and environmental degradation.

    This documentary is completely self-funded.
    Please like/share and support:
    facebook.com/WDYDTL
    twitter.com/WordSmithProd
    wordsmithproductions.co.uk

    Why is the Ecuadorian government proposing to extract oil in an area frequently classified by ecologists as one of the most biodiverse rainforest regions left intact on earth?
    Filmed in Sani Isla and Ecuador’s capital city, Quito, this feature-length self-funded documentary film tells the story of the indigenous Kichwa community living in Sani Isla along the Napo River, bordering the Yasuni national park. Narrated by Daddy G of Massive Attack, the film features music especially composed for the project by Daddy G and Stew Jackson.
    It features:
    Academics who explain the governments push for oil in order to fund development;
    Leading researchers who demonstrate the unique species and rich biodiversity existing within the region;
    Community members explaining their long history in the area, and their plans for a sustainable future based on eco-tourism for future generations;
    And a government minister who was part of a now cancelled initiative which could have saved the region entirely.
    Repeatedly threatened with enforced oil extraction by both the government and military on their ancestral land, the people of Sani Isla have thus-far remained strong in the face of Petro-dollar$, resolving instead to maintain their traditional way of life.
    Breaking their bond with a forest that has sustained their people for generations would be the death of their culture and community.
    Community leader and shaman Patricio Jipa explains that their fight to conserve the forest – the lungs of the universe – is a cause we should all lend our voices to and support.
    Where do you draw the line?

    # vimeo.com/192969528 Uploaded
  5. Raw unedited footage of Carlos Grefa and his son showing our production crew around his 'finka' (small piece of land on which he grows produce to sell at the local market) his father's house and the rainforest surrounding his property.
    Filmed on location in Sani Isla, Yasuni national Park, The Amazon, Ecuador.

    In return for putting this film online for FREE we ask viewers to support our work.
    Please share our film with 5 like-minded friends, and like/share our official pages:
    facebook.com/WDYDTL
    twitter.com/WordSmithProd
    wordsmithproductions.co.uk

    Why is the Ecuadorian government proposing to extract oil in an area frequently classified by ecologists as one of the most biodiverse rainforest regions left intact on earth?
    Filmed in Sani Isla and Ecuador’s capital city, Quito, this feature-length self-funded documentary film tells the story of the indigenous Kichwa community living in Sani Isla along the Napo River, bordering the Yasuni national park. Narrated by Daddy G of Massive Attack, the film features music especially composed for the project by Daddy G and Stew Jackson.
    It features:
    Academics who explain the governments push for oil in order to fund development;
    Leading researchers who demonstrate the unique species and rich biodiversity existing within the region;
    Community members explaining their long history in the area, and their plans for a sustainable future based on eco-tourism for future generations;
    And a government minister who was part of a now cancelled initiative which could have saved the region entirely.
    Repeatedly threatened with enforced oil extraction by both the government and military on their ancestral land, the people of Sani Isla have thus-far remained strong in the face of Petro-dollar$, resolving instead to maintain their traditional way of life.
    Breaking their bond with a forest that has sustained their people for generations would be the death of their culture and community.
    Community leader and shaman Patricio Jipa explains that their fight to conserve the forest – the lungs of the universe – is a cause we should all lend our voices to and support.
    Where do you draw the line?

    # vimeo.com/192978918 Uploaded

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