1. This piece is constructed of two location recordings made on January 20th, 2009 in New York - one audio, one video. The audio recording was made whilst queueing alongside an old woman. The video recording was made whilst walking the streets of Manhattan afterwards. The piece aims to present a general impression of this historic day, and the specific sentiments of one individual. It explores how an historical event can be both timeless and momentary; colored by the participation of the masses and experienced through a single perspective.

    The video is processed to reflect the nature of the audio content. It is unmistakably digital and thereby contemporary, yet it is timeworn in its palette and visual degradation. It is a snapshot of the present stylized as a blurred memory; a counterpoint to the monologue of recollections from a woman who was born in a different age and still speaks now.

    Directed by PJ Norman. Taken from the album 'Reflection' by Iamprimate. Released 2010 on 100m Records. © 2010 PJ Norman. All rights reserved.

    # vimeo.com/13534268 Uploaded 15 Plays 0 Comments
  2. tKatKa (pronounced 'Te-Kat-Ker') is a Swedish / English electronic music duo based in London, England. The project is a collaboration between artists PJ Norman and Carlsson. The group formed officially in 2004. Their first release was on a compilation for the Glass Shrimp show on Resonance FM in early 2005. In late 2005 a white label of their track "Lazerslab" was broadcast by the influential BBC Radio 1 DJ Annie Nightingale. This led to a record deal with the independent London label Junkbait Music through which they released two singles. Soon after, they created their own imprint, 100m Records, to release their well received debut album ʻtKatKaʼ.

    With these releases, tKatKa garnered radio-play from John Kennedy and Nick Luscombe (XFM); and from Mary Anne Hobbs (BBC Radio 1). They have received international support from James Zabielaʼs ʻ4 seriesʼ mix compilation for Proton Radio, which featured on various European radio stations, including Kiss FM.

    In 2008 tKatKa released their second full-length album, "TerrorKnowledgeAction", the opening track of which is "Global Fascist State". The album also included the single "Grief Hijackers" which was an extensive remix of the original song by Tom Hickox.

    The duo perform live with Dan Foord of acclaimed math-metal group SikTh on drums and Will Alderwick (Far Cries, Clay Machine Gun) on bass. The show includes bespoke visuals, filmed and remixed live by Triggerset. Notable appearances include Bestival on the Isle of Wight curated by BBC Radio 1 DJ Rob Da Bank; the Big Chill House in association with Exceptional Records; and 93 Feet East as part of the Shortwave independent film festival.

    # vimeo.com/13301740 Uploaded 114 Plays 0 Comments
  3. tKatKa (Te-Kat-Ker) are an electronic music duo based in Shoreditch, East London. Comprising of PJ Norman and the Swedish Carlsson, tKatKa were born on 2004, and have since released several well-received singles that have earned them airplay on Xfm and Radio 1 as well as a europewide audience in Croatia, Russia and over Scandinavia.

    If there were to be a soundtrack to the film 'God Is In The TV: In Space', this would probably be it. Intergalactic mutterings can be heard – this music comes from the deepest corners of the galaxy, aliens of all kind have been entranced by it and now it has finally reached planet earth.

    First single and opening track 'Lazerslab' had widespread press attention, and rightly so. Its mix of haunting keys and Aphex-Twin-esque processed drum beat is drawn against a big booming bass that combine to make the archetypal ambient dance cum techno record. This flows into the menacingly understated E.L.D.A.C., with its looping delayed keyboard which is joined by rasping drums that keep a steady and not too hectic rhythm.

    Introduced by waves and seagulls, 'Storm Proof Weather' threatens to explode, but reassuringly doesn't, staying at the same pace and volume level throughout; a lesson in the art of audible relaxtion. '(It's Just a) Molecule' is the most entrancing track on the CD, with a slightly negative but soothing feel, it seeps deep into the soul and is one of the most affecting songs put to digitally controlled tape in recent times. The most exploratory tune on the record is 'Let It Float', it could be pushing it's way through wild undergrowth in a distant undiscovered land with a gentle sliding melody that gives way to cold Antarctic drums.

    'Sundae Haze' is the closest the pair come to sounding like they're about to build up into a Royksopp frenzy and with 'Sound Of Sound' almost achieve it, with flowing sounds, reminiscent of an afternoon on the beach in blistering sunshine. The final track is 'Globyl', an ominous sounding song that drives itself along with a gentle pulsating hum with echoed speech somewhere far in the distance.

    The collection of songs tKatKa have produced are stunning and if ambience and not too hyper techno is your thing, it is a must have addition to the CD collection. If it is not the sort of thing that would usually find its way onto your stereo, it is definitely worth checking out because of the dazzling array of auditory goodness that will stand before you.

    4/5*s

    GOD IS IN THE TV MAGAZINE

    # vimeo.com/13298396 Uploaded 151 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Having already gained notable attention for his collaboration with electronic improvisation group Fates, composer Django Voris releases this stunning soundtrack album. Born and raised in the deserts of Arizona, Voris found himself adept at learning new instruments from a young age. After acquiring skills in a handful of wind and brass (trumpet, trombone, flute, saxophone), and adding the guitar to his repertoire, he finally settled on piano as his instrument of choice.

    To create his distinct sound, Voris combined his multi-instrumental abilities with a longtime passion for computing (he learned CBASIC as a child on his grandfather’s old portable Osborne 1). By utilizing samples and field recordings through his own computed processes he achieves a very modern multiple-format approach to music, where any sound source is an instrument.

    It is only with such a diversified background as a musician that a soundtrack like The Strange Particle could be realized. The sequential growth of lines, and their development through the registers portrays a gifted knowledge for the methods of presenting a full range of frequencies and timbres. The songs are assembled using multiple sound sources, samples and field recordings; and integrated alongside improvised and composed piano and guitar parts. The results are at times fuzzying, dense and unsettling; and at other times belie vulnerability in their clarity. In equal measures polarizing and reassuring.

    The album was written by Voris to accompany the anime film of the same name, which was directed by the late Neil Chamberlain. In the same way that the soundtrack was built from fragments of sound recordings, the anime was created using a collage of footage from the pair: some filmed, some animated by hand, and some computer animated. The entire project was initially conceived around what Voris describes as “an epic, Wagnerian kinda drama”. When pressed, he explains:

    “We were viewing each piece in the soundtrack, and each episode of the anime, as parts of an incomplete story that we were uncovering. We would take a pseudo-historical viewpoint to create a mythology that we could then present in fragmented impressions.”

    It sounds lofty, yet with this approach the pair succeeded in creating a mesmerizing otherworldly audio-visual experience.

    Tragically the anime was left incomplete with the sudden death of Neil Chamberlain in May 2010. In support of the soundtrack album, and in support of our own belief that Chamberlain’s remarkable work should be seen by all, 100m Records put out three excerpts from the film, one per month, from the release date of the album.

    # vimeo.com/13286384 Uploaded 21 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Having already gained notable attention for his collaboration with electronic improvisation group Fates, composer Django Voris releases this stunning soundtrack album. Born and raised in the deserts of Arizona, Voris found himself adept at learning new instruments from a young age. After acquiring skills in a handful of wind and brass (trumpet, trombone, flute, saxophone), and adding the guitar to his repertoire, he finally settled on piano as his instrument of choice.

    To create his distinct sound, Voris combined his multi-instrumental abilities with a longtime passion for computing (he learned CBASIC as a child on his grandfather’s old portable Osborne 1). By utilizing samples and field recordings through his own computed processes he achieves a very modern multiple-format approach to music, where any sound source is an instrument.

    It is only with such a diversified background as a musician that a soundtrack like The Strange Particle could be realized. The sequential growth of lines, and their development through the registers portrays a gifted knowledge for the methods of presenting a full range of frequencies and timbres. The songs are assembled using multiple sound sources, samples and field recordings; and integrated alongside improvised and composed piano and guitar parts. The results are at times fuzzying, dense and unsettling; and at other times belie vulnerability in their clarity. In equal measures polarizing and reassuring.

    The album was written by Voris to accompany the anime film of the same name, which was directed by the late Neil Chamberlain. In the same way that the soundtrack was built from fragments of sound recordings, the anime was created using a collage of footage from the pair: some filmed, some animated by hand, and some computer animated. The entire project was initially conceived around what Voris describes as “an epic, Wagnerian kinda drama”. When pressed, he explains:

    “We were viewing each piece in the soundtrack, and each episode of the anime, as parts of an incomplete story that we were uncovering. We would take a pseudo-historical viewpoint to create a mythology that we could then present in fragmented impressions.”

    It sounds lofty, yet with this approach the pair succeeded in creating a mesmerizing otherworldly audio-visual experience.

    Tragically the anime was left incomplete with the sudden death of Neil Chamberlain in May 2010. In support of the soundtrack album, and in support of our own belief that Chamberlain’s remarkable work should be seen by all, 100m Records put out three excerpts from the film, one per month, from the release date of the album.

    # vimeo.com/13285294 Uploaded 10 Plays 0 Comments

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