1. Title: Sensable Heatscapes: Introduction to the SHADE Research Lab

    Abstract:

    Heat is the leading cause of weather-related mortality in the U.S. and poses a significant threat to public health. Future population exposure to extreme heat is expected to increase as rapid urbanization continues. Heat waves are projected to last longer and become more intense and more frequent, challenging the resilience of urban systems. This presentation will provide an overview of past, current and future research at ASU’s new SHADE research lab that addresses the nature of heat and the challenges it creates for existing and future cities. SHADE explores this “hot” topic in three dimensions: heat as it can be sensed by biometeorological instrumentation, heat as it is experienced by humans and heat as it can be modeled using microclimate simulations. Using Phoenix as a sandbox, SHADE research highlights the importance of microclimate-responsive urban design for creating pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces and building heat-resilient “climate smart” cities.

    Bio:

    Ariane Middel is an assistant professor in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering with a joint appointment in the School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering. Previously, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Geography and Urban Studies at Temple University. She received her doctorate in computer science from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, and holds a Master of Science in engineering from the University of Bonn, Germany. Middel’s research interests lie in the interdisciplinary field of urban climate with a focus on climate-sensitive urban form, design, landscapes and infrastructure in the face of extreme heat and climatic uncertainty. Her ongoing work is focused on developing better models and metrics to quantify urban “heatscapes” as they are experienced by pedestrians. She currently develops a thermal comfort model based on an innovative big data approach using Street View data, deep learning and novel environmental sensing techniques such as her biometeorological “MaRTy” cart. Middel is an active member of the Urban Climate Research Center at ASU and currently serves a four-year term (2016–20) on the Board of the International Association of Urban Climate.

    # vimeo.com/314836144 Uploaded 8 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Title: Artificial Intelligence for 2D and 3D Compositing

    Abstract:

    Editing programs are now part of the creative flow of multimedia artists. Thanks to the recent advances in artificial intelligence, this field evolves rapidly, leading to enhancements and new features in editing software every year. In this talk, we will cover the technology behind some of the advanced features in Adobe's new 2D/3D compositing software, Dimension. More specifically, the automated camera positioning and outdoor lighting estimation features will be discussed.

    Bio:

    Yannick Hold-Geoffroy has recently obtained his doctorate from the Computer Vision and Systems Laboratory under the supervision of Professor Jean-François Lalonde at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. He recently joined Adobe Research, where he continues his work on outdoor illumination, camera calibration estimation and 3D scanning. When he’s not thinking about computer vision, Yannick keeps himself busy playing music.

    # vimeo.com/299520269 Uploaded 63 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Title: Ways of Walking, Ways of Hearing

    Abstract:

    “Walking is a way of knowing,” writes Timothy Ingold, who reciprocally asks if knowing might be a way of walking. What is the relationship between embodied movement, spatial awareness and epistemology, or the culturally agreed upon ways in which we understand knowledge to emerge and be legitimated or contested? What role do media and the senses play in these interactions? How are the senses reconceived within the milieux of mobile media and sound reproduction technologies in particular? Sound has become the primary spatial medium I am engaged with as an artist. I am recently rethinking the sonic dimension as I move from a mostly headphone-based practice to a new inquiry that embraces the reproduction of sound through loud speakers in both public outdoor and more rarefied indoor settings. This talk will address critical questions that lie at the core of media aesthetics through a series of works staged as responsive sound environments delivered via mobile media and/or custom loud speaker installations.

    Bio:

    Teri Rueb is an artist and professor of critical media practices at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her practice unfolds in the extended fields of sound, mobile media art and land-based critical spatial practices. She has created GPS-based interactive sound installations since 1996 and has received awards including a Prix Ars Electronica Award and nominations for the CalArts Alpert Award, the Rockefeller New Media Award and the Boston ICA Foster Prize. Her work has been supported by the Ucross Foundation, the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Santa Fe Art Institute, La Panacée, Edith Rüss Site for New Media, The Banff Center for the Arts, the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art, Artslink, Turbulence.org, and various state arts councils. She lectures and presents widely at venues including Ars Electronica, ISEA, SIGGRAPH, Transmediale and IRCAM.

    Her scholarly writings have been published by MIT Press, Routledge and University of Minnesota. Writings about her work have appeared widely and most notably in anthologies and survey texts such as “Digital Art” (Thames and Hudson, World of Art Series), “Walking and Mapping” (MIT Press), “Information Arts” (MIT Press), “Ubiquitous Computing: Complexity and Culture” (Routledge) and “Mobile Audience” (Springer).

    She has played key roles in developing new programs, curricula and doctoral degrees at the Rhode Island School of Design and the University at Buffalo, among others. She holds a doctorate from Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a master’s degree from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts interactive telecommunications program and a bachelor’s degree in art and literary and cultural studies with honors from Carnegie Mellon University.

    # vimeo.com/299029266 Uploaded 38 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Title: Distributed Networks of Listening and Sounding: From Tuning Presents to Turing Presence

    Abstract:

    Drawing on recent projects, in this talk I will discuss my approach to creating performative contexts using computational media that engender intersubjectivity and distributed creativity. Building upon my life as an electroacoustic composer and improviser, this work emphasizes collective emergence and immersion of the nonvisual senses as a means to amplify (rather than mute or mask) a sense of presence-in-the-world for individual and group. Machine agents, interactive media and telematic connections are integrated as material conditions and interactors that serve to enhance, complexify and challenge this larger network of activity.

    Bio:

    Doug Van Nort is an artist and researcher whose work integrates electroacoustic music and collective improvisation with machine agents, immersive sound, embodied listening and networked performance practices. Van Nort regularly presents this work internationally, and recent projects have included compositions for his Electro-Acoustic Orchestra, a soundscape piece for ancient Chinese bells commissioned by the Smithsonian's Freer-Sackler Gallery, a 21-dancer interactive dance and music piece for the National Ballet School of Canada's Asembleé Internationale 2017, and an evolving, solar-powered environmental sound installation commissioned by the Fieldwork land art site. His work is informed by his background and experiences in deep listening, free improvisation, electroacoustic and computer music, mathematics and media arts. Van Nort is the founder of the DisPerSion Lab at York University in Toronto, where he is Canada research chair in digital performance and an assistant professor cross-appointed between the departments of computational arts and music.

    # vimeo.com/298225124 Uploaded 55 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Title: Ordering Volatile Openings: Instrumentation and the Rationalization of
    Body Odors

    Abstract:

    Odors define many things: plants, foods, people. But how does technology define odors? In this talk, we will take a close look at how the combination of computing, human noses and a novel analytical chemistry instrument, the gas chromatograph, were used in the 1960s in an effort to solve the "problem" of vaginal malodors, often described as — or attributed to consumption of — strongly flavored foods such as garlic. We will look at how medical researchers mimicked patterns from the food industry for ordering the world of taste and smell, using those patterns to characterize and then medically reign in the excess smells of the body and its microbial and microbial companions. That promise reverberated out into society in ways that continue to haunt larger efforts to order people, even as the technology itself has shifted.

    Bio:

    Trained in chemistry, the culinary arts and food studies, Christy Spackman critically examines how science and technology have come to shape sensory experiences of smelling and tasting. She is an assistant professor, jointly appointed between the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and the Art, Media and Engineering Department at ASU.

    # vimeo.com/294470114 Uploaded 31 Plays 0 Comments

Fall 2018 Digital Culture Speaker Series

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Fall 2018 Digital Culture Speaker Series

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