1. Founded by Allan Edmunds in Philadelphia in 1972, the Brandywine Workshop and Archives provides a fertile environment for artists from diverse backgrounds to create cutting-edge prints. Reflecting on 50 years of artist residencies, educational outreach, and community building, Edmunds will discuss highlights from Brandywine’s history and share goals for new projects ahead.

    On view through July 2022, the special exhibition "Prints from the Brandywine Workshop and Archives: Creative Communities" marks the first presentation of a group of innovative prints acquired by the Harvard Art Museums from the Brandywine Workshop in 2018.

    TAKE A CLOSER LOOK:
    + Exhibition "Prints from the Brandywine Workshop and Archives: Creative Communities": hvrd.art/brandywine
    + Article "Brandywine: Inspiring Collaboration and Community": harvardartmuseums.org/article/brandywine-inspiring-collaboration-and-community
    + Learn more about Brandywine archives and database 'Artura.org:' brandywineworkshopandarchives.org/brandywine-archives/

    Speakers:
    + Allan Edmunds, artist, educator, and founder, Brandywine Workshop and Archives;
    + Elizabeth Rudy, Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Curator of Prints, Division of European and American Art, Harvard Art Museums.

    This talk is part of a series inspired by ReFrame, a museum-wide initiative to reimagine the function, role, and future of the university art museum. These talks examine difficult histories, foreground untold stories, and experiment with new approaches to the collections of the Harvard Art Museums, reflecting the concerns of our world today.

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    All images and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and this channel does not claim any right over them. Copyright Disclaimer: Any use of copyrighted content on this channel constitutes “fair use” pursuant to 17 U.S. Code § 107 as it is utilized for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

    Video Thumbnail Image: Allan Edmunds in the Brandywine Workshop and Archives studio. Screencapture of archival video, coursey of Brandywine Workshop & Archives. © Brandywine Workshop & Archives.

    Special thanks to Allan Edmunds and Brandywine Workshop & Archives. Recorded Tuesday, March 8, 2022. © President and Fellows of Harvard College. For questions related to permission for commercial use of this video, please contact the Department of Digital Imaging and Visual Resources at [email protected]

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  2. Krzysztof Wodiczko and filmmaker Maria Niro offer comments prior to the screening of the documentary film "The Art of Un-War."

    The Art of Un-War is an in-depth exploration of Wodiczko’s life and the art interventions he creates as powerful responses to the inequities and horrors of war and injustice. The film delves into timely works such as Abraham Lincoln War Veteran Projection in Union Square, NYC, where Wodiczko projects the voices and images of soldiers from 20th and 21st-century wars onto the statue of Lincoln.

    Throughout the film, the artist’s powerful interventions become examples of how art can be used to disrupt public complacency.

    The evolution of Wodiczko’s political art unfolds throughout the film from his first intervention created in Warsaw in 1968, to one of his most ambitious projects and a focal point of the film - a radical proposal to transform Paris’ Arc De Triomphe war monument into a site for peace-building research and activism. Wodiczko counters the monument’s glorification of war and portrayal of distorted histories by constructing scaffolding around the Arc De Triomphe and transforming it into its complete antithesis.

    SPEAKERS:
    + Maria Niro, filmmaker;
    + Krzysztof Wodiczko, contemporary artist and Professor in Residence of Art, Design and the Public Domain at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University;
    + Introductions by Mary Schneider Enriquez, the Houghton Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Harvard Art Museums.

    TAKE A CLOSER LOOK:
    + Exhibition "Krzysztof Wodiczko: Portrait": harvardartmuseums.org/exhibitions/6171/krzysztof-wodiczko-portrait
    + Film "Krzysztof Wodiczko:The Art of Un-War:" un-war.com/

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    All images and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and this channel does not claim any right over them. Copyright Disclaimer: Any use of copyrighted content on this channel constitutes “fair use” pursuant to 17 U.S. Code § 107 as it is utilized for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

    Works by Krzysztof Wodiczko © Krzysztof Wodiczko. Video Thumbnail: Still from "Krzysztof Wodiczko:The Art of Un-War," courtsey of the filmmaker.

    Video: Recorded April 5, 2022. © President and Fellows of Harvard College. This video is restricted for internal, research and archival use only. For questions related to permission for commercial use of this video, please contact the Department of Digital Imaging and Visual Resources at [email protected]

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  3. On this tour celebrating Black History Month, Harvard undergraduate students Phillip Michalak ’23 and Cecilia Zhou ’22 discuss two new works of art by renowned Black artists now on view at the Harvard Art Museums: Kehinde Wiley’s "Portrait of Asia-Imani, Gabriella-Esnae, and Kaya Palmer" (2020) and Rashid Johnson’s "Untitled Broken Crowd" (2021). Looking closely at how these paintings treat the body, materials, and space, the Student Guides explore the common ground between the artists and the differences in the paths they have taken.

    TAKE A CLOSER LOOK:

    + Kehinde Wiley, "Portrait of Asia-Imani, Gabriella-Esnae, and Kaya Palmer," 2020. Oil on linen. Loan by The Tim & Danny Art Foundation, TL42289. © Kehinde Wiley. hvrd.art/o/372815
    + Rashid Johnson, American, "Untitled Broken Crowd," 2021. Ceramic tile, mirror tile, oyster shells, branded red oak, bronze, spray enamel, oil stick, black soap, wax. Anonymous Loan, Harvard Art Museums, TL42317. © Rashid Johnson. hvrd.art/o/372970
    + Explore more virtual tours and chats with our student guides: Ho Family Student Guides

    TIMESTAMPS:
    00:05 Introductions
    02:15 Kehinde Wiley’s "Portrait of Asia-Imani, Gabriella-Esnae, and Kaya Palmer" (2020)
    16:34 Why focus on these two artists?
    17:13 Rashid Johnson’s "Untitled Broken Crowd" (2021)
    28:48 Q&A

    SPEAKERS:
    + Phillip Michalak, Ho Family Student Guide at the Harvard Art Museums, Harvard Class of 2023, Concentration in Mathematics;
    + Cecilia Zho, Ho Family Student Guide at the Harvard Art Museums, Harvard Class of 2022, Concentration in Art History and English Literature.

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    The Ho Family Student Guide Program at the Harvard Art Museums prepares students to create original, research-based tours and interpretive materials about the collections. Rooted in the Student Guides' individual perspectives, each tour offers a unique, thematic viewpoint and opportunity for conversation.

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    All images and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and this channel does not claim any right over them. Copyright Disclaimer: Any use of copyrighted content on this channel constitutes “fair use” pursuant to 17 U.S. Code § 107 as it is utilized for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

    Video Thumbnail: Visitor viewing Rashid Johnson’s "Untitled Broken Crowd" (2021) in the Harvard Art Museums gallery. Photo: 2021 Caitlin Cunningham Photography © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

    © President and Fellows of Harvard College. Video: Division of Academic & Public Programming. For questions related to permission for commercial use of this video, please contact the Department of Digital Imaging and Visual Resources at [email protected]

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  4. Learn how Byzantine and Coptic weaving traditions in Egypt influenced Tiraz textiles in the Islamic period. Historical textiles are one of the most ancient and intimate art forms, and touch nearly all aspects of human existence. They are also a medium of exchange and form of wealth. Visit the exhibition, on view January 22, 2022–May 8, 2022.

    TAKE A CLOSER LOOK:
    + Exhibition—"Social Fabrics: Inscribed Textiles from Medieval Egyptian Tombs": hvrd.art/socialfabrics
    + Order your copy of the exhibition catalogue today: hvrd.art/buythebook
    + Read article “Unraveling the (Production) Secrets of an Egyptian Textile” by Julie Wertz: harvardartmuseums.org/article/unraveling-the-production-secrets-of-an-egyptian-textile
    + Watch more videos related to the exhibition “Social Fabrics:” Social Fabrics: Inscribed Textiles from Medieval Egyptian Tombs

    SPEAKER:
    + Katherine Taronas, Visiting Fellow, Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art, Harvard Art Museums; Ph.D Candidate in the Dept. of History of Art & Architecture, Harvard University.

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    All images and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and this channel does not claim any right over them. Copyright Disclaimer: Any use of copyrighted content on this channel constitutes “fair use” pursuant to 17 U.S. Code § 107 as it is utilized for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

    Video Thumbnail Image: Cuff band with animals in interlocking scrolls, Late 4th-early 5th century, textile, Harvard Art Museums, 2004.204. hvrd.art/o/54963

    © President and Fellows of Harvard College. Video: John Neely. For questions related to permission for commercial use of this video, please contact the Department of Digital Imaging and Visual Resources at [email protected]

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  5. Join curator Mary Schneider Enriquez for a close look at the pioneering work of artist Gego and her place within the burgeoning Venezuelan art scene in the mid-20th century. Focusing on a new acquisition from the artist’s Drawings without Paper series, this talk will explore Gego’s practice of marrying a language of structure with an evocative sense of experimentation, in sculptures that combine materials typically pieced together by hand.

    TAKE A CLOSER LOOK:

    + Gego (Gertrude Goldschmidt), Venezuelan, "Drawing without Paper 85/1" (Dibujo sin Papel 85/1), 1985. Wire, string, wood and aluminum tubes. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of John Cowles, by exchange; Francis H. Burr Memorial Fund; purchase through the generosity of Charlotte Wagner, and Estrellita Brodsky, 2020.3. © Fundación Gego. hvrd.art/o/367314

    SPEAKERS:
    + Mary Schneider Enriquez, Houghton Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

    This talk is part of a series inspired by ReFrame, a museum-wide initiative to reimagine the function, role, and future of the university art museum. These talks examine difficult histories, foreground untold stories, and experiment with new approaches to the collections of the Harvard Art Museums, reflecting the concerns of our world today.

    ---

    All images and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and this channel does not claim any right over them. Copyright Disclaimer: Any use of copyrighted content on this channel constitutes “fair use” pursuant to 17 U.S. Code § 107 as it is utilized for the purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.

    Video Thumbnail Image: Gego in her studio, 1984, Photo: Isidro, Núñezm. © Fundación Gego, Courtesy Dominique Lévy Gallery, New York / London.

    Video: Recorded December 14, 2021. © President and Fellows of Harvard College. This video is restricted for internal, research and archival use only. For questions related to permission for commercial use of this video, please contact the Department of Digital Imaging and Visual Resources at [email protected]

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Art Talks at the Harvard Art Museums

Harvard Art Museums

In our Art Talks series, curators, conservators, fellows, and graduate students share short, informal videos that offer an up-close look at works from our collections.

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